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Stickseler ain't the only one that loves wood...

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by newyorkin, Sep 5, 2005.

  1. newyorkin

    newyorkin 1 ton status

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    I love cutting up trees and splitting them for winter... I just took down a little Black Walnut (I think) yesterday, and a Black Cherry over the past few weekends. Anyone who can see the wood, please correct me if I'm wrong, I'm not too knowledgable in forestry... But man, that Black Walnut has a gorgeous grain and smells great when split. I wish I knew what it was before I cut it up, or I'd have left a couple long pieces and tried to mill them to make a plaque or stool or something...

    Hey Thunder, how long do you let a tree "season" before burning it, after you cut it down and split it?

    IMG_4743.jpg

    IMG_4749.jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2005
  2. darkshadow

    darkshadow 1 ton status

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    *looks* like black walnut but not so much in the close up.

    the heartwood should look slightly purpule, and when sealed is a dark brown with a silghtly purpule overtone.

    i might not be the sap wood isnot usualy so dominate in black walnut, but more towards the outer edge only.
     
  3. jarheadk5

    jarheadk5 1/2 ton status

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    Whatever it is, I bet it'll smell real nice as it surrenders it's heat energy for you come winter.
    Re: seasoning - I've always been told a year of being kept dry (overhead cover, like a tarp or a porch) and loosely stacked is good for seasoning of firewood. I've found that the smaller the split pieces are, the faster they dry.
    Oh, don't wrap your woodpile in a tarp, it'll never dry that way. It'll grow moldy and rot, too. Ask me how I know...
     
  4. newyorkin

    newyorkin 1 ton status

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    OK. I really have no idea, I was just going by a tree ID web site, by the fruit, not even the grain. Whatever it is, I really like the grain and think I'm going to throw a coat of Poly on a piece just to see how it looks under polish...
     
  5. newyorkin

    newyorkin 1 ton status

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    Ah yes, I learned that lesson also... I was thinking of running to Home Depot (sorry, with the price of gas, Lowe's is too far!), getting a pile of 2x4's, and building a multiple "shelf" setup so I only stack the logs 2 or so high before the next shelf starts, so there's a lot of airflow through them. I'm not sure about how to keep them dry, though, I'd have to frame a tarp over them...

    I can see by the end of today I'm going to have a framed shed with 50 year shingles, heat coils, insulated walls... :doah:
     
  6. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    looks like cherry to me..

    I'm no forest ranger either,but your logs look just like the cherry trees I'm about to cut down soon!.(mine have the same shaggy coarse bark,and dark inner circle when cut!)--.they smell good while being cut,and while your burning them too..I wont miss the thousands of berry sized "cherries" they drop all over my truck and driveway,and anything else in their path! :mad: --I have at least 6 large (50' high,6-10' diameter) ones to cut down..many are going to be quite a chore,they are tangled up in other trees..

    I used to get a lot of free pallets from factories--I burned most of them,but I used several to stack the wood on to keep it off the wet soggy ground--I even built a woodshed out of them!..its been there 10+ years--pretty soon I'll have to dismantle it and use it for heat--the floor boards are starting to dry rot--foot went right thru one spot! :doah: :crazy:
     
  7. Corey 78K5

    Corey 78K5 1 ton status

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    Well if You love it so much come on out and I can put ou to work at My Folks place. They burn 12 cords a year. Yeah I really loved that year after year :rolleyes:
     
  8. newyorkin

    newyorkin 1 ton status

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    Uh yeah, so I think I'm a gonna hang out with my little barely-a-cord-if-even-close pile...
     
  9. hi pinion

    hi pinion 3/4 ton status

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    MMMmm, nothing like the smell of burning wood in the fireplace, feels like home. I dont know about you, but i like winter far better than the summer time :thumb: :thumb:
     
  10. Stickseler

    Stickseler 3/4 ton status

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    Thats my job next weekend....Splitting the Poplar and Birch we dropped 3 months ago
     
  11. PhoenixZorn

    PhoenixZorn 1/2 ton status

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    Now, I'm by no means a tree hugger, and when worse comes to worse, you'll see me with an axe in my hand faster than anyone else, but I don't approve of cutting down young hardwood trees for firewood, especially when they are getting more rare every day. Like I said, I'm not a tree hugger, but my neighbor has enlightenned me on the subject recently, when I asked if we could cut down the lightning struck tree at the corner of our lot lines. He said no, that only half the tree was dead, and that the tree is more than 150 years old. He figured if it lived 150 years, and lived through 2 lightning strikes, it could stand to live a few more years on its own. He would however help me remove some of the dead branches.

    Now, I have recently planted 5 hardwood saplings around my yard. When I moved in, I had a few birch trees in the front yard that are about 5-10 years old (3 inch trunk diameter) and the row of very large trees along the back line of my yard. I also have about 30 twenty foot tall pine trees. When we moved in, there was a newly planted pine tree at the end of the existing row, which was about 1 foot high. That tree is now 3 times it's size from last year, and the 5 saplings that I planted, have barely grown more than a couple of inches.

    The trees that you guys are so quick to chop down (unless they are in the way of building your house or something) are probably older than you. If left alone, they would take your entire lifetime, and the lifetime of your kids, to reach 3 feet in diameter. That's about 80-100 years before it is truly a mature tree. I believe in harvesting trees like black walnut and cherry for the beauty of their wood, and when they are much older than the ones you guys are cutting, but to use black walnut for firewood is like having sex with your grandma... you just shouldn't do it. Really, if you had left that tree grow for another 10-15 years, you likely would have had a $10,000 tree. For a knot free hardwood tree more than 2 feet in diameter, you'd be amazed what woodworkers will pay for them. I want to build a new stock for my SKS out of Black walnut. The blanks for that stock will cost me more than $500.00 and it is only 3 feet long and 10 inches wide.

    Think about that next time you chop down a walnut, cherry, oak, or maple tree for firewood. Please, if you are going to use hardwood for firewood, make sure it is already scrap (if your uncle owns a cabinet shop) or dead.
     
  12. Corey 78K5

    Corey 78K5 1 ton status

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    With comments like that around here You would be a full fledged green party member. Theres stumps on My parents property with over 2000 growth rings that gramps cut down with the old crosscut saw. For all you city folk types (Ratch) thats one year per ring.
     
  13. PhoenixZorn

    PhoenixZorn 1/2 ton status

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    Not at all... that one year per ring stuff is a myth... some trees grow up to 3 rings per summer in Wisconsin where it's cold, and I'm sure down south, the trees can grow as many as 20 rings in a single year due to the ideal climate. No... I'm not a full fledged member of the green party, and I take offense to that comment. As I said, I have no problem cutting down really old trees, it's cutting down the young ones for no reason that gets me. Trees are worth a lot of money when they are big, and not so much when they are small. The tree that Ratch cut down looks to be about enough for one or maybe two fires at my house. For all the work he did, I would have rather seen him say, "check out this 20 year old Douglas Fir that I cut down", rather than "look at this 50 year old Black Walnut that I just cut for firewood...."
     
  14. Corey 78K5

    Corey 78K5 1 ton status

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    Well around here our old growth redwood has one ring per year. It also makes great kindling :D
     
  15. big pappa b

    big pappa b 3/4 ton status

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    I've been doing the same thing this week. My co worker had about 12 trees cut down in his yard and I cut up and hauled off the maple and oak for him :D I left him the pine :haha:
    And then I've been cutting on this hickory tree that got taken out last year from the 3 tropical storms. It's about 24" diameter and 200ft tall...and all mine :D
    Picking up some professional grade chains tomorrow. Should make the cutting soooooo much better
     
  16. jarheadk5

    jarheadk5 1/2 ton status

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    And how do YOU know what the situation was at Ratch's house?
    I have an oak and a maple in my backyard that are coming down this winter; both have trunks in the 2-3ft diameter range. The oak is lifting a corner of my garage slab up (enough to make my garage door close crooked), and the maple is right next to my septic tank. Both hang over power and phone lines, and both sway way too much for comfort in high winds. I can't afford the risk of them dropping uncontrolled on my house or garage, or my neighbors' homes. They will also yield enough good wood to keep my family warm for quite a few winters to come.
    I have NO intentions of risking damage to my home, or my neighbors' homes, just to allow these trees to grow bigger.
     
  17. newyorkin

    newyorkin 1 ton status

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    As Ken pointed out, these trees were far from ideal for growing past maturity. I take trees down for reasons, not for burning. Making them fuel is just a fringe benefit of taking them down.

    The alleged Black Walnut has horribly pervasive roots, and it was too close to the driveway for me. I'd have guessed it had another 2 years before it destroyed that section of belgium blocks and pavement. I took another one down next to my house 2 years ago, after it had run it's roots up under my basement floor and destroyed 3/4 of it. Not to mention that it constantly dropped fruit all over the street and driveway. We have another one growing in the back yard, it's roots are tearing up an old concrete foundation slab. That one's coming down next summer... Both the tree I just took down and the tree I will take down next year are probably around 20 years old.
    The Cherry was growing at an angle over my neighbors driveway, and would soon either drop on his driveway or a vehicle in a decent storm, or it's roots would be ripping up his driveway in a other few years. Another Cherry in the back yard will be taken down next year, it's diseased and kind of dangerously extended pretty far horizontally.

    I also had no idea what kind of tree it was when I took it down. Had I known it was a nice hardwood, I would have still taken it down, but I would have bucked it much longer to use the wood for something other than firewood. The only reason I looked it up was because the core was so nice looking, it was coming down no matter what kind of tree it was.

    I dunno how big your fireplace is, but we probably only used about 5 or 6 hardwood logs per 4/5 hour fire last year using the same Cherry. Once split, that pile of logs in the picture will last a lot more than two fires for us.

    You should be glad I'm using it for firewood! Before I knew what it was (or thought I knew), I had it stacked at the curb for the town to pick up...

    BTW, I've read properly seasoned pine and fir are actually better for low creosite deposits (I have a fireplace) and high BTU output, but unlike hardwoods the embers usually don't last until morning.
     
  18. beater_k20

    beater_k20 Banned

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    i'm not so sure i'd be bragging about that... :rolleyes:
     
  19. Resurrection_Joe

    Resurrection_Joe 1 ton status

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    I don't have wood right now, so I'll just be in love with Ratch's wood
     
  20. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    I only cut dead wood..

    All the Cherry trees I'm gonna cut down are dead as a doornail,cracked,and ready to fall by themselves and possibly injure or kill someone,or crush any vehicles parked nearby..and they are as "crooked as the grinch's dick", :haha: as one poster so elequently put it,so they are useless for any woodworking projects like furniture,and a few had thousands of carpenter ants inside,and are all hollowed out in the center!...so I wont be indiscriminantly chopping down every tree just for heat..they NEED to go! --but I dont go looking for live trees to cut and season for a year--I want wood I can toss right into the stove,and there is plenty of dead and broken trees thanks to all the blizzards we had last winter..:crazy:

    I'd much rather just turn up the thermostst,than to have to labor for hours using the chainsaw,risking life and limb cutting theese trees!..but unless I hit the lottery,I dont see how I'm going to be able to heat the house,AND fill my gas tanks in my vehicles..dont really have a choice this winter..its already gotten down to 47 degrees the other night here! :eek1: :doah:

    Oh,and I burn EVERYTHING that will burn!--Pine,Maple,Ash,and any other wood I can get my hands on!--I'm hoping I can find another source for free pallets--NOTHING burns hotter than the hardwood pallets are made from--its like neuclear fission when you put them in the stove! :D they suck to cut up though.. :doah: :crazy:
     

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