Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

Suggestions on arc welder

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by kwcdawgfan, Feb 27, 2001.

  1. kwcdawgfan

    kwcdawgfan Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2001
    Posts:
    91
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Georgia
    Good news today is I am getting dough back from uncle sam and was thinking of getting an arc welder to make a few bumpers and grille guard but was wondering if there were any advantages to having a acetelyn (sp)gas... Also what do I need to look for when buying an arc welder??? Thanks for the help...
     
  2. fastzilla

    fastzilla Registered Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2001
    Posts:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    Gas bottles are good for cutting and thats about it when it comes to bumpers and stuff. The stick welders are great for rusty dirty thick steel, like fences and stuff. They are real hart to get a clean looking weld but the penetrate excellently and don't care about the cleanliness or preparation. They will weld through any thing. A TIG (Tungston Inert Gas) are great for precision welding as they use stainless steel rod they are very strong. They are, however, very slow, time consuming and require a great deal of practice to get a decent weld, even more practice to make look respectible. MIG/wire feed welders are the best all around welder you can get. Spend the extra money and get the CO2/argon mix bottle/regulator set up instead of the flux core wire. Your welds will thank you. MIGs are idiot proof. Most come with a chart, choose the metal thickness and wire diameter/gas combo and it'll tell you the amperage and speed settings you need. hook up the ground, put the stinger to the joint squeez the trigger a voila, you will have professional looking, and penetrating, welds with about 30 seconds of practice...There will be no need to grind unless your weld looks like a Chia Pet. But if you do have too many hairs, turn the speed down and try again... Worth the money...
    Eddie
     
  3. wayne

    wayne 3/4 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2001
    Posts:
    6,178
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Carlisle, Pa
    I would also recommend a mig. They are alot easier to opperate and more versatile. If you buy a good one you can weld just about anything.

    <A target="_blank" HREF=http://jamonline.homestead.com/fromthegroundupK54x4/89Jimmy.html>http://jamonline.homestead.com/fromthegroundupK54x4/89Jimmy.html</A>
    <font color=blue>Happy Trails[​IMG]</font color=blue>
    <font color=blue>Wayne</font color=blue>
     
  4. Sparky

    Sparky 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2000
    Posts:
    423
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    San Antonio(summer) Texas A and M (school year)
    migs are good and stick welders are good. If you get a stick welder that gos in a 220 socket you can weld over half inch thick metal if ya want. The stick welder although it is bigger will be cheaper than the mig. You can get pretty clean welds out of a stick welder if you have alot of pactice. Also, you can clean them up with a angle grinder if ya dont like em. Oxy Accetelyne are great for cutting, but are a pain in the ass to weld with. I would strongly recomend getting a small oxy accetelyne set to cut with and a good arc welder. If ya dont want to spring for both, I would get the arc welder and then buy alot of metal blades for your circular saw and or miter saw. You can buy those at just about any hard ware store. A good bench grinder is another added bonus for cleaning stuff up.

    Once you have your bumpers done you should think about a Lincon Locker. (weld the diff shut). HEHEHE.

    Sparky

    When all else fails... Check the blinker fluid.
    78 K-5
     
  5. Pugsley

    Pugsley 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2001
    Posts:
    3,556
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Tucson, Arizona
    I've got a 225 amp Miller, and a little 90 dollar Harbor Freight buzzbox. MIG machines are pretty much idiot proof, as long as you use the gas with it - the flux core takes a little more getting used to. If you plan on doing any heavy duty fab work, I'd either go with a stick or TIG. Most garage grade MIG's are limited to 3/16" or smaller steel.
     
  6. Burt4x4

    Burt4x4 3/4 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    6,854
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    California (Modesto area)
  7. 1990SilveradoK5

    1990SilveradoK5 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2001
    Posts:
    185
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Napoleon, OH
    I bought a Lincon Weld Pack 100, 120V MIG welder last fall, it is my first welder and I am by no means experienced. And like the others say, pull the trigger and go. If you want to weld plate thicker than 1/4" you will need to purchase somthing that pushes more Amps, however for the thinner stuff I couldn't ask for more.



    Gone Large and Loving It.
    Keith
     

Share This Page