Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

Suspension principals? Books? Articles?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by sled_dog, Mar 31, 2003.

  1. sled_dog

    sled_dog 1 ton status

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2002
    Posts:
    16,870
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Anyone know where I can find books and/or articles on suspension stuff? Like 4 links, 3 links, coilover setups, coil sprung, semi elipticals, plain on leaf, and any other thing around. Want to expand my knowledge to the utmost.
     
  2. K5MONSTERCHEV

    K5MONSTERCHEV 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2003
    Posts:
    3,254
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Castro Valley, CA
    Four Wheeler mag. Not exactly sure which issue though.
     
  3. willyswanter

    willyswanter 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2000
    Posts:
    2,690
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Bakersfield, CA
    Go to amazon.com and there are quite a few good books.

    Chassis Engineering by Herb Adams is pretty good.
     
  4. sled_dog

    sled_dog 1 ton status

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2002
    Posts:
    16,870
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    I read Fourwheeler front to back each month and learned most I know in it but I haven't read anything about 4 links and 3 links principals yet.
     
  5. ntsqd

    ntsqd 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2002
    Posts:
    3,381
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    So. CA
    Engineering textbook on the topic:
    Race Car Vehicle Dynamics, Milliken & Milliken
    Likely the best:
    Chassis Engineering, Herb Adams
    Good background, covers some unusual designs:
    Compitition Car Suspension, Allan Staniforth
    Aged, but has some good info:
    How to Make Your Car Handle, Fred Puhn
    Have not read:
    Race Car Chassis: Design & Constrution, Forbes Aird
    GM Suspension Designer during Donohue's dominance of CAN-AM, nearly rivals the Adams book:
    Race Car Engineering & Mechanics, Paul Van Valkenburgh


    And the SOURCE for design details:
    Engineer to Win, Carroll Smith
     
  6. heavy4x4

    heavy4x4 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2002
    Posts:
    3,270
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Delafield, Wisconsin
    3-link and 4-link:

    Here's the basic principle: the means of suspension dampening (coil shocks or whatever) does not in any way locate the axle. For this you need bars that locate the axle from moving sideways and forwards and backwards. 3 link means 3 attachments to the axle keeping it from moving front and back. 4 link means there are 4 bars - two on top of the axle and 2 on the bottom of the axle that then attach rearward to the frame locating the axle.

    Here's some reading I pulled up on a Google search, not great - but kinda good.
    Here's some really good reading about 4-link...with diagrams too


    Quarter Eliptical suspensions:
    Basic principle: cut your leafspring in half. /forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif
    Decent reading about 1/4 eliptical

    There ya go...enjoy. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  7. zakk

    zakk 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2001
    Posts:
    4,762
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    San Jose CA
    a search in the PBB General 4x4 forum will get you a few nights worth of reading
     
  8. K5MONSTERCHEV

    K5MONSTERCHEV 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2003
    Posts:
    3,254
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Castro Valley, CA
    There was an article in '01 Four Wheeler about suspension theory. One in march '00.
     
  9. sled_dog

    sled_dog 1 ton status

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2002
    Posts:
    16,870
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    thanks but I know the general stuff about 3 and 4 links I want to learn the advanced stuff. Thanskf or the help guys. Got some reading to do.
     

Share This Page