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SUV license

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by arq, Jun 24, 2003.

  1. arq

    arq 1/2 ton status

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    that would be cool, it would teach a lot of those idots how to drive on the road /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
    SUV license

    ARQ.
     
  2. landsmasher

    landsmasher 1/2 ton status

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    I agree wholeheartedly with everything he said... Of course, then again, I think that people should have to be licensed to procreate and in some cases they should require certain people to have a license just to be seen on the street. /forums/images/graemlins/deal.gif
     
  3. Z3PR

    Z3PR Banned

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    [​IMG]


    SUV Drivers' Licenses


    Riding a motorcycle safely requires specific skills and knowledge, above and beyond the basics needed to safely operate a car. And because of the higher order of difficulty and unique safety issues involved in riding a bike, most states require the would-be motorcyclist to successfully pass separate written and road tests before the "M" endorsement is added to the basic driver's license. No "Class M" endorsement, and you're not allowed to ride bikes.

    Similarly, many states require a "Class C" endorsement for those wishing to operate tractor-trailers and other commercial vehicles. The reasoning is the same: It's a matter of public safety that people wishing to operate highly specialized vehicles on public roads demonstrate at least basic proficiency and awareness of their vehicles' unique characteristics before being permitted to drive them.

    So why don't the same rules and logic apply to SUVs?

    This one's red-hot and sure to generate screams of outrage, because SUVs are hugely popular, as well as huge profit centers for the automakers. But the fact remains that, like motorcycles and commercial vehicles, SUVs are specialty vehicles very different from ordinary cars; they have unique driving characteristics and require a higher order of skill to operate safely.

    This is especially true of the large, truck-based SUVs--several of which are nearly 20 feet long and weigh more than 6,000 pounds. Among other things, they are harder to maneuver than cars, especially in close quarters; stopping distances are also much longer than an ordinary car's. And if driven stupidly--as they so often are--an SUV can be made to roll over much more easily than a car, too.

    Yet there are no special SUV licensing requirements in any state.

    Perhaps--and this is just a suggestion--there ought to be. Most of the nattering about SUV safety is not so much a problem with the SUVs, but rather with how they're driven--often by people who have no clue that their 4,500-pound 4x4 is not a sport sedan and shouldn't be expected to take a corner like one. The Ford/Firestone debacle was the result, to a great extent, of people in hot Southern and Western states driving their Explorers at high speed (80 mph or more) for extended periods of time. They apparently didn't realize (or weren't hipped to the fact) that the M&S-rated specialty tires (for "mud and snow") used on many SUVs, including the Explorer, were never designed for sustained high-speed driving. Add in the widespread problem of Explorer drivers not routinely checking their tire pressure (critical, since underinflated tires will heat up and fail even faster when subjected to continuous high-speed driving), salted just a touch by the fact that when an SUV becomes unbalanced at speed--such as when a tire suddenly fails--it is much, much harder to recover than a car. Under such conditions, the resulting carnage was foreordained.

    Maybe the Firestone tires were bad, too. But no matter how good the tire, no truck-based SUV is as safe to drive as fast as a car. It can become uncontrollable much more readily--and will definitely roll, if provoked, far more easily than any car.




    Then there are issues of blind spots, and all the related visibility problems that attend SUVs. The list goes on.

    The facts--and common sense--suggest that, at minimum, some sort of written skills test for would-be SUV drivers ought to be put in place as a way of assuring that people who want to drive an SUV know what they are getting into, and are thus better prepared to deal with it properly.

    A booklet could be issued--just like the ones the DMV provides for regular licenses and motorcycle endorsements--that would explain the different driving characteristics (and potential dangers) of SUVs as compared to ordinary cars. It would discuss such things as how much longer it takes an SUV to slow down and stop than a car, especially in a panic-stop situation--and emphasize the need to adjust safe following distances accordingly. It would explain that knobby, off-road tires are not designed for sustained high-speed operation (anything much more than 70 mph is very risky), and that, while the modern SUV may feel as stable as a car at 80-plus mph, these vehicles are nonetheless far more susceptible to violent loss of control and rollover if the driver is forced to attempt an emergency lane change, such as occurs when steering around a dead animal that suddenly appears in the road. (It goes without saying that weaving and violent lane changes--inherently dangerous in a car--are much more so in an SUV.)

    That would be a start.

    SUVs may have become mass-market vehicles, now accounting for about 50 percent of all new "car" sales. But the skills and knowledge peculiar to their safe operation have not attained similar commodity status. It may be time to rethink our anything-goes policy about who may drive them on public roads. (((((((((( I for one would love too see a special license required for SUV's !!!! It'd stop alot of jackasses from acting like they own the road !! ))))))))))
     
  4. LittlePig

    LittlePig 1/2 ton status

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    Yeah, great idea. Let's let the government become even more intrusive into citizens' lives. Yes, this is funny, but unfortunately, it is just stupid enough that some liberal fawktard will jump all over it. Better idea would be to, as vehicle buyers, convince the automakers to stop turning trucks into wanna-be cars, thus enticing the yuppies to buy them. I wholeheartedly support the production of Sport Cutes and the new "jacked-up stationwagons" they have all started producing (which is what the yuppies wanted anyway). If the big machines start riding (and handling) like trucks again, all the people with a high money:brains ratio will stop buying them. Then we can get back to the business of driving REAL trucks again (2005 all-straight-axle GMs, anyone? How about a 2005 M715 w/ the cummins turbodiesel?)
     
  5. R72K5

    R72K5 Banned

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    [ QUOTE ]
    that would be cool, it would teach a lot of those idots how to drive on the road /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
    SUV license
    ARQ.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    bad idea, that could lead to more pissed off drivers and then could lead to same thing for other types of vehuicles, we have way too much governing rules over us as it is,..

    just my $.02......
     
  6. chebywanna

    chebywanna 1/2 ton status

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    i don't see how doing the license thing would be a cotrol issue with the government (longer lines at DMV? ill bring a tent with), it would be another subject where the gov tells us what we can or can't do but there still planty of ways to move around (ex. cars/vans) not to say that people driving cars drive any better, but i do like the idea of making trucks trucks again better (rough ride). /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
    i would like to see special endorcement for pulling trailers though (boat/car/whatever trailers) especially because i nearly flipped mine with a truck on it, now i know why noone ever loads vehicles on backwords /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif
     

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