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sway bars, Lights

Discussion in '1969-1972 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by twosnvrlose, Dec 2, 2006.

  1. twosnvrlose

    twosnvrlose Registered Member

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    Just put a 6" lift on a 72 blazer and a set of 35" cooper discovery stt and now I need a set of sway bars. Any idea's on a brand name? Any pics ? I am looking for a quick release. Or is there any other way to correct the body roll? Also is there any better light that go in the stock location? I picked up a set of new halogen and they still suck.
     
  2. bigbluesuburban

    bigbluesuburban 1/2 ton status

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    Sway Bars... I am afraid I don't understand. That just does not comprehend.

    Actually I don't think that I would jump to that until you have driven the truck a while. You may just be freaked out by the new feel of the rig.

    I have owned flexy rigs and ridgid rigs. Each one takes a specific driving style.

    As for headlights... I am no expert, but I think that you can get the conversion headlights that allow you to run 9006 and 9007 bulbs. And/Or you may want to consider some new wiring and some relays.

    Do a little searching on here and Pirate to see if there is some info on that.
     
  3. Jimmy4matt

    Jimmy4matt Registered Member

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    I'd also be interested in sway bar options. I think LMC Truck has some high output headlight wiring and brighter headlight bulbs.
     
  4. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    73+ sway bars will work on the 1st Gens..... just need to fab up some pivot brakets off the engine crossmember. BobK has some detailed pics of how he did his....

    A set of ORD sway bar disconnects is step 2. The front bar on the street is a nice upgrade, but you have to be able to remove it for "real" wheeling.

    I've only ever seen one K5 with a rear bar, and I don't know if it was a factory piece or not. A rear bar may be overkill anyway. I'd start with the front one, drive it and evaluate....
     
  5. vtblazer

    vtblazer 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    Why? :confused:

    Does it drive bad/unsafe now?

    If it's a daily driver, I could see it maybe.
     
  6. twosnvrlose

    twosnvrlose Registered Member

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    Yea it drives bad its not a daily driver but its very soft and feels very tippy and with all the snow and the body roll it gets kinda scary. The other option would be to move the shocks to the outside of the frame to try and take the roll out of it any thoughts?
     
  7. MNorby

    MNorby 3/4 ton status Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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  8. vtblazer

    vtblazer 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    I've seen those types installed and working on the trail.

    They do a good job and still allow for all the flex.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Inboarded rear shocks perhaps?? :D

    That would explain a lot. Relocating them to a more appropriate position might make enough of a difference that you won't care about swaybars anymore.
     
  10. twosnvrlose

    twosnvrlose Registered Member

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    yes the rear shock are mount inside the frame and the are very close to the diff has any one relocated the rear shocks if so pics please. If I move the mounts on the axel right next to the spring hangers it about 4 inches farther to the outside and leave the frame mounts were they are?
     
  11. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    This pic of mine may serve to excite or confuse you (or both)! :D

    [​IMG]


    It was accomplished with custom upper and lower mounts...but I was able to fit a 12" travel shock back there without doing the more typical /\ "pyramid of shocks" method....

    :usaflag:
     
  12. twosnvrlose

    twosnvrlose Registered Member

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    any other pics of the top mount? with out the wires in the way? are the wires for the a rear winch mount?
     
  13. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    No great detail pics of the whole thing, but here is a shot to show the angles from a profile view:

    [​IMG]


    A couple of points, and suggestions:

    I've got a 2" body lift, so I've got a bit more clearance for the upper shock mount than most people....I'm also running a 12" travel shock, which is pretty extreme.

    If you want to solve this on your own truck with your own shocks, here is what you do:

    Step 1: Measure the full extended length of your shock (eyelet to eyelet)
    Step 2: Measure the fully compressed length of your shock
    Step 3: Subtract the "little number" from the "big number" then divide result by 2.
    Step 4: Add the result from Step 3 to the "fully compressed" measurement of your shock.

    At this point, you have calculated an overall shock length that is exactly 1/2 of the way through it's range of travel. 50% of the piston is still showing. This is a good starting point... More exotic methods exist to figuring out the exact amount of bumptravel (up) you need, but I'm trying to teach you the "concept" here.....you can apply that stuff later.

    Step 5: This is where it gets fun. Grab a scrap of 2"x2" lumber and cut it to the shock length you've calculated.
    Step 6: Start slapping that imaginary shock around in your wheelwell and see where it might fit. This will show you clearance issues with the springpack, or underside of the body, etc.

    By spending some time on this step, you will probably find an arrangement where you can weld in a shock mount only slightly lower than the axletube and still get the shock to fit under the truckbed without cutting. Remember, your objective is to keep the shock as vertical as possible, otherwise you might as well just leave them inboarded near the pumpkin!!!!

    Normally, you wouldn't want the shock mounts to hang below the axletube at ALL, but when you see how close they are to the backing plate of your brakes, you'll realize that they will be almost impossible to ever hit on a rock....they are really well protected in most of the spots that are on the outside of the leafpack.

    Anyway....it doesn't take long to do some experimenting, so I'd recommend you make up a "wood shock" and go see what you can come up with....


    :usaflag:

    ps. Those wires weren't for a winch, those powered an 8-channel, 1600W stereo system.
     

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