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t-case rebuild tools

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by 85blazer350, Mar 24, 2002.

  1. 85blazer350

    85blazer350 Registered Member

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    Ive decided to rebuild the t-case my self and will be buying a kit right away.I was wondering all the tools that I will need and any pointers I will be going by the haynes manual in the 73-87 chevy full size.Ive also never opened one of these up.
     
  2. fortcollinsram

    fortcollinsram 1/2 ton status

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    A rubber mallet, s set of flat-head screwdrivers, and some good snap ring pliers...other than that, your rebuild kit should include the gasket-maker, the seals and bearings...Basically, unbolt the front output flange, unbolt the tail housing and pry/knock the tail housing off, then you undo all the bolts that hold the tow halfs together anf pry them apart...once apart then all the pieces are there, and replace what you need to then seal it up and bolt it together...

    Good Luck...

    Chris
     
  3. mike reeh

    mike reeh 1/2 ton status

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    what kind of transfer case?

    i had my 205 completely apart.. I dont remember needing anything special.. good snap ring pliers like the man said, and maybe some grease to hold needle bearings! oh and a lot of patience. good luck, it will be well worth it when you're done

    mike
     
  4. possum

    possum Registered Member

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    Is it really that simple? I have two 203's in my yard and I've been wondering about rebuilding them. If it is really that simple I may just go for it.
     
  5. Sparky

    Sparky 1/2 ton status

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    i have done a 203 and a few other t-cases, and trust me the 203 isnt really "that easy" There is alot more needle bearings and alot more parts. Two "range forks" (one is for the hi/lo range and the other is for the differential lock) instead of one, and a differential as well as all the extra parts to go with those extra parts. Trust me, its alot more complicated. On the otherhand, if you have some good pictures and a little extra time anyone can do it. No special tools needed other than snap ring plyers.

    Sparky
     
  6. BowtieBlazer

    BowtieBlazer 1/2 ton status

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    Man, I wasnt going to post on this one but everyone is seeming to forget that you will need a torque wrench to retighten everything back down to spec. I believe the rest is covered in previous posts. I bought a torque wrench when I did mine and now its one of my favorite tools in my tool box.
     
  7. mike reeh

    mike reeh 1/2 ton status

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    I didnt need a torque wrench to do the 205.......

    what REALLY helps is to have two transfer cases.. I had an exploded diagram of the 205 when I tore into it but I didnt refer to it once. I was swapping parts between two 205's and having another one is a real time saver if you forget something... Same with my trucks, Im putting together a 77 from the ground up.. putting the fuel & brake lines on the frame would have been a nightmare without the other 77 sitting right behind it to refer to...
    mike
     
  8. LKJR

    LKJR 1/2 ton status

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    Ok don't know what you have, probably a 203 which I haven't done but a 205 your gonna need a rubber hammer, set of large snap ring pliers, small ones don't get it and the parts store here didn't have any big enough, I had to borrow some mac pliers from a mechanic friend. a large socket set, rear is a 1 5/16 nut and don't remember the front output size, also a long punch or some old skinny screwdrivers, search on here and there's some manuals scanned on the 205
     
  9. ftn96

    ftn96 1/2 ton status

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    Like they said....basic hand tools and some snap ring pliers. And a low end torque wrench would be prefered...
    But Yes, they are cake to re-build
     
  10. Brian 89KBlazer

    Brian 89KBlazer 1/2 ton status

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    One little note to add.

    I just finished the SYE kit in my NP241. Talk about easy! /forums/images/icons/smile.gif
    Before I attempted it; I kept hearing the term "a GOOD set of snap ring pliers" & used to wonder what a "good" set was.
    Well; if the other t-cases use the same type snap rings; the "Good" snap ring pliers are actually a pair of "Eaton Style External Retaining-Ring Pliers". They are for flat snap rings that have pointed ends; not the type with two small holes for normal snapring pliers. To see them, goto <a target="_blank" href=http://www.mcmaster.com>www.mcmaster.com</a>. Under "Hand Tools" in the righ-hand column, pick "Pliers". In the scroll down box at the top of the screen; pick "Retaining-Ring Tools" &amp; scroll about 1/2 way down the page.
    In the meantime; I got all my snap rings off with regular pointed-tip snap ring pliers except for the big one on the mainshaft holding the synchromizer. Instead of buying a pair for 1 snap ring; I made a set of pliers out of 1/8" flat plate! /forums/images/icons/smile.gif.......cheap!

    Good Luck
     
  11. possum

    possum Registered Member

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    Well, one transfer case kept locking into the low gear and didn't want to come out w/o prying on it from underneath and twice it slipped out of l-loc. Is it just the chain stretching? That should be an easy repair, right? The other wasn't mine but attatched to a transmission given to me. They said it was stuck in 4hi. Hi or hi-loc I don't know. I would like to get the range box off one for a doubler and just fix the other for a spare until I can get the doubler. And where can I find a t-case rebuild kit?
     
  12. angelglo

    angelglo 1/2 ton status

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    i have rebuilt a couple of 203's and as lkjr said, you need a 1 5/16 socket. the catch is that the socket has to be a thin walled socket. if you look around, you will find one but if you have the thick walled socket, it will not fit between the nut and the yoke
     
  13. TXBIGFISH

    TXBIGFISH 1/2 ton status

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    If you have a 208 you'll need an inside slide hammer/ bearing puller. That was the biggest pain in tail when I rebuilt my 208.
    By the way, cheapest place I have found to get a rebuild kit is a place called trans star industries here in Dallas, actually grand prarie, the kit for my 208, bearings seals and all, $85.00.
    You also might want to take a trip to your local library and find a Motor Manual and get a copy of the exploded view or the transfer case. It will help a lot!
    If you need one for a 208 let me know I will scan them and mail them to you.
     
  14. Brian- Was it really that easy to rebuild. My 241 in my Suburban has 172k miles on it and i'm sure it could benefit from a rebuild. Did you need any slide hammers, or any thing like that?
    Thanks
     
  15. Brian 89KBlazer

    Brian 89KBlazer 1/2 ton status

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    Mat

    Yes; it was alot easier than I expected. I was paranoid about sets of bearings falling out, etc but when I opened it; too easy! All I used was 2 or 3 sizes of sockets &amp; a pair of snap ring pliers. As to the slide hammer; I can't think of where it would be used. /forums/images/icons/shocked.gif I even swapped in a new 32-spline input gear for my new TH400 tranny. The only thing I didn't remove was the front output yoke &amp; shaft. Only reason I didn't remove that was I forgot to remove/loosen the yoke nut before pulling the case. /forums/images/icons/blush.gif Instead; I simply pulled the snap ring holding the front output gear on &amp; slid the mainshaft &amp; front output gear off together with the chain.

    Just have a clean area to work on &amp; for added piece of mind; I wiped everything down before reassembly &amp; coated them with some clean ATF. Made it all slip back together nice &amp; easy. /forums/images/icons/smile.gif

    Good Luck &amp; feel free to PM me if you have any ??'s
     
  16. Brian,

    Thanks for the info. As soon as it warms around here so I can work outside, I'm going to try it. I dont think the t-case was used often before me, most Suburban 4wd's are not. But I want to because of age/miles.
     
  17. jimmyjack

    jimmyjack 1/2 ton status

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    I did mine a fewe years ago and it really was pretty simple. Just be careful removing the main shaft cos if spill those needle bearings your going to go nuts finding them. Did you ever see James and the Giant Peach? They're like those little green worms!!
     

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