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The differance between Zero rates and blocks?

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by K5on38s, Feb 14, 2003.

  1. K5on38s

    K5on38s Registered Member

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    I had made another post earlier this week about ways to lift the front of my truck w/o having to buy new springs and and a couple guys said to buy zero rates....It may sound stupid to some of you but honestly i see no differnance between blocks and zero rates other than they bolt to the spring pack. But does it really make that much of a differance? Im buying the zero rates no matter what but id just like to understand them a little better.

    /forums/images/graemlins/ears.gifim all ears/forums/images/graemlins/ears.gif
     
  2. Shaggy

    Shaggy 3/4 ton status

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    <font color="green"> A zero rate is kind of a cross between a block and an add-a leaf. It's not really tall enough to be a real block, but it doesn't increase the spring rate like an add-a-leaf. So Stephen Watson of ORD fame dubbed them "O-rate add-a leaves", so called because they install like an add-a-leaf but they don't increase the spring rate like one. </font color>
     
  3. wfo163

    wfo163 1/2 ton status

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    Exactly! They attach to your spring pack just like an add a leaf, in other words the bolt that holds the pack together holds the 0-rate on as well. This really cuts down on the axle rap attributed to blocks as they are part of the leaf spring pack. Okay enough double talking. I plan on using them as well to bring up the back end of my truck a bit. /forums/images/graemlins/truck.gif
     
  4. imiceman44

    imiceman44 1 ton status

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    Basically, if you put a block in the front, there is danger in it flipping from under the spring pack, but if you have a plate that is 1" thick and 3"x6", do you think it could flip?
    SO basically if you want to put a 1" block, go ahead, it's not the block that is the problem, it's those 3" or 5" blocks that people used to put that is the problem.
    I saw a blazer once with a welded 3" spring pad, this one will not flip becuase it's just a high pad, but you still have more leverage on the spring which creates spring wrap.
    1" isn't going to create too much difference so yes go ahead and do it.
    As for blocks in general, I think the rear or front they are equally dangerous when they exceed the 3" height.
    I would never use a block higher than it's width, just common physics will show you it's very suseptible to tipping sideways and under pressure, be it in the front or the rear it could flip.
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  5. txbartman

    txbartman 1/2 ton status

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    Most stuff has been stated, but the real difference between the 'blocks' and the 'zero rates' is that one is clamped between the spring perch and the spring pack and the other bolts to the spring pack.

    Think about walking with blocks under your shoes. Think of how unstable you would be if you simply tied a string around the block and your shoe using the string to "clamp" the block under your foot. It would be real easy with a slight amount of side, front, or rear force to pop that block out from under your foot and the "clamping" mechanism.

    Now imagine the stability if the block were bolted to your shoe. Sure there is some instability just from the added height, but the block is not going to squirt out from under the shoe. If it falls sideways or something, the shoe would have to go with it.

    For our rigs, the same theories apply. If you have a regular block, it is held in place only by the clamping pressure of the u-bolt. With sufficient non up and/or down force, the block could be ejected from its position between the perch and the spring. That would be a bad thing! If the block were bolted to the spring pack, however, it would take a great deal more force to dislodge it as it is secured by the clamping pressure of the u-bolt as well the securing of the bolt. For the bolted-on block to come loose, it would have to have enough pressure to snap the bolt.

    Most people do not "bolt" on a block greater than 1" as the longer the bolt, the easier it would be to snap. Although it would still be more secure than simply using a block.

    That is the difference between a bolt-on block and a regular lift block. Most people do not use blocks on the front axle as it is most likely to have non up and/or down forces applied to it. In addition, many people go with blocks to retain the ride of tha factory spring as more arch usually equals stiffer ride. On our rigs the front springs are originally inverted. So a front lift spring has significantly less arch to it than a rear lift spring.

    I would never run a front lift block, but I have no problems running a front zero-rate. They also provide me with a convenient way to relocate my axle forward without drilling additional holes in my spring perches and/or spring packs making the whole effort much better for me in the long run.
     

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