Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

Thoughts/opinions on a 2 link front?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by timmay, May 13, 2005.

  1. timmay

    timmay Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2004
    Posts:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Here
    I have a '72 C10 that I would like to convert to a K20 with around 10 to 12 inches of lift. It seems like it would be real easy to use some box iron and bolt it in place of the leaf spring on a 10 bolt front and attach it with a spring bushing (like the one's from ORD) to a bracket welded to the frame somewhere under the cab, which would make the bars about 4 feet long. The truck is 2wd so it already has the right steering box for crossover. I was thinking of this idea because I want to use air bags or coil springs instead of leaf springs. The rear already has a coil spring set up. Crazy articulation and massive ground clearance isn't an issue as this truck will never see any rocks. It will be mostly street driven, used about 3 times a year in truck pulls, and mudded occasionaly. It also seems like this would eliminate any axle wrap.

    Thanks for any opinions.
     
  2. sled_dog

    sled_dog 1 ton status

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2002
    Posts:
    16,870
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Going to need a panhard bar too. Sure that setup will somewhat control side to side, but overall its just not going to get the job done. The rear on many of those trucks is the sameway(who knows maybe yours is), but it has a panhard bar as well. Other than that, it really just won't flex well. Bushing wear will likely be a big issue. You won't have any droop, or barely any. Will wear out poly bushings when drooping or compressing. I know you won't be crawling, but every time you hit a bump or a hole in a mud pit, your suspension is drooping and compressing.
     
  3. timmay

    timmay Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2004
    Posts:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Here
    Yep, I knew about the panhard too but didn't bother mentioning it because I though it was an assumed item. The rear has coil springs and a panhard, but it's way too short and sometimes when going over big bumps I can feel the rear of the truck go side to side. It isn't real bad when the truck is empty, but with a lot of weight in the bed it gets a little crazy. And the fact that my shocks are junk doesn't help the situation. But I will make a longer one for the rear also.

    Could explain to me why you think the spring bushings in the arms would wear quickly? The bars would only be used to position the axle as the weight is loaded directly to the axle through the air bag/coil spring. It seems like they would be less stressed than the front spring eye bushing in a leaf spring set up.
     
  4. 79 blazer

    79 blazer 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2003
    Posts:
    114
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    FORT COLLINS,CO
    isnt that what they did on monster garage for the corvette mud truck, the baja racing vehicle builder specialist suggested that.
     
  5. timmay

    timmay Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2004
    Posts:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Here
    I don't know, I don't own a TV. I can look it up online maybe.
     
  6. sled_dog

    sled_dog 1 ton status

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2002
    Posts:
    16,870
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    It is a lot of work to position an axle. Especially if you are puting horsepower and torque through it. Like I noted, no matter what they will move, spring bushings aren't meant to twist that much(spring usually does thats). Much of the power put to the wheels will travel through the links. I'm not trying to say its a horrible idea, its not. You are thinking, you may be able to do it cheap and cool. I wouldn't crawl with it, but you don't want to so that doesn't matter. A set of bushings from the Radius arms of a Ford may be a better idea. These will allow more twisting in the front suspension(thus riding and wearing better). That or a heim joint at the end of each of the radius arms(since thats basically what this is).

    You are right the stock rear panhard is too short. If you retain that suspension(doubt you will, never seen a lifted one, though it would be different), definetally put a longer one on.
     
  7. Bubba Ray Boudreaux

    Bubba Ray Boudreaux 1 ton status

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2001
    Posts:
    20,716
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Undisclosed Location
    OOhhhhhh the irony :D
     
  8. miniwally

    miniwally 1/2 ton status Premium Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2003
    Posts:
    3,069
    Likes Received:
    206
    Location:
    Colorado
    Thats exactly what I thought Bubba.

    I think you need to study up on three and four link suspensions a bunch before you jump into your project. It should all work but you need to have a good educated idea of what you are doing a project like this.

    I have done a few three and four link systems and they all have had their own individual problems to work around.

    Just study up on the net and get to work
     
  9. justhorsinaround

    justhorsinaround 3/4 ton status

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2003
    Posts:
    6,798
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Northerish Phoenix, Az
    Timmay from Illinois?????

    I think one should look into this.
     
  10. timmay

    timmay Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2004
    Posts:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Here
    Thanks sled_dog. I never thought about the twisting, but now that you explain it to me it makes sense. Back to the drawing board...
     
  11. dhcomp

    dhcomp 3/4 ton status Premium Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2001
    Posts:
    9,862
    Likes Received:
    295
    Location:
    Truckee, CA
    I second the other replies. You still need somethign to locate the axle side to side. A panard bar can work ok on a truck, but they're not really designed to keep the axle located correctly with any decent amount of flex involved. I sortof belive they should be used only on street cars, liek wiht rear parallel 4bar setups and the like.
     

Share This Page