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TIG Experts: Which Model to Buy?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by bigblock454, Aug 5, 2003.

  1. bigblock454

    bigblock454 Clack Clack Clack Premium Member

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    I am going to buy a new TIG welder, I have never TIG welded before and need suggestions on which model to buy. It will be for mostly thin mild steel and aluminum. I want something with the capability to weld extremly thin material, aka a beer can!
     
  2. DrMaserati

    DrMaserati Registered Member

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    Miller Synchrowave 250. They have smaller, less expensive machines, but they won't work as well for very thin material. Or in general. Their Econotig can't be set below 30 amps, and is rated for down to 18 gauge. That's not very thin. The Synchrowave 250 can be set all the way down to 5 amps. Also, some low end models are DC only. You will need AC if you plan on welding aluminum.

    You can probably get a 250 completely set up and ready to weld for around $3600 to $3800. Sounds like a lot, but when it comes to TIG welders it's a situation where you get what you pay for. Because of the cost, unless you plan on doing a whole lot of welding you will probably be money ahead to pay someone to do it for you. The down side to that is you can't say "I did it myself," which is sometimes worth a whole lot more than money can buy.

    There are certainly other good machines out there. I happen to prefer Miller welders for the same reason I prefer Chevy trucks. Personal preference.

    If you have never used a TIG machine you should probably check into taking a class somewhere. It's not nearly as easy and straighforward as MIG or stick welding. Especially when dealing with aluminum. Here's a link to a page at the Miller website that gives a comparison of welding methods and the required skill levels and costs.

    http://www.millerwelds.com/products/basics_hints/
     
  3. dhdescender

    dhdescender 1/2 ton status

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    I intend to buy the miller 250 within a few weeks. I wanted it for the versatility of welding both very thick and thin matereals, IE frames & bumpers down to bikes (my profession)
     
  4. Zeus33rd

    Zeus33rd Smarter than you GMOTM Winner

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    The 250 menioned above is a good choice. One disadvantage is that they have to remain more or less stationary. They have to have circulating water lines for cooling. A line going in and a line going out. (I do production TIG/MIG welding for my daily bread..:D ) Also, no provision for the bottle. An alternitive would be the Miller Tig Runner 250 DX. Totally self contained with a water tank and a shelf in the back for the bottle. And on wheels so you can roll it around. We've got three of these at work with 2 more on the way.

    Picture-
    [​IMG]

    http://www.weldingmart.com/Qstore/p000076.htm
     
  5. bigblock454

    bigblock454 Clack Clack Clack Premium Member

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    What about a Dynasty 200 DX? Is the Advanced WaveForm Technology worth paying extra for?

    Thanks for the info
     

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