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Tire machine advice, mine is OLD!

Discussion in 'The Tool Shed' started by uglytruk, Jan 19, 2007.

  1. uglytruk

    uglytruk 1/2 ton status

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    I bought a well used Coats 10-10, maybe it's a 20-20, 25 years ago for $250. Anyways, It's not made for mag wheels, and Coats had a kit to upgrade the arm, but I'm out a date.
    So last night I'm fighting to remove a Michelin tire, (they're always tough) from a mag wheel, and the machine dies.
    Are the import rim clamp machines any good? I only do 25 tires a year.
    Here's pix of my machine, and a similar one at my neighbors, with the updated pressure arm. It goes straight down instead of at a slight angle, therefore not trying to grab the edge of the mag, and usually slipping off after it damages it...

    1 19 07  100 AMP Coats 20 20  PH Junk 010.jpg

    1 19 07  100 AMP Coats 20 20  PH Junk 009.jpg
     
  2. Confedneck79K30

    Confedneck79K30 3/4 ton status

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    rim clamps are the shazzle
     
  3. sled_dog

    sled_dog 1 ton status

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    rim clamps are NOT the shizzle. I like them, they are great, SOMETIMES. Majority of the time they can't unseat the lower bead and push the rim up off of the machine and I end up using a shovel style machine to break the bead.

    I'd look at something like this with a plastic head on the arm(not the shovel, the changer arm). I know hunter and Coats both make one like I just described.
    http://www.completehydraulic.com/tc370.html

    I can't find any of them on Ebay quick, but either Hunter or Coats makes a machine like this:
    Hunter Machine
    That has the shovel, AND the clamp arms on it. Now thats a sweet setup. Expensive though.

    We have both styles I showed in our shop(except our Hunter Machine doesn't have a shovel it has the clamp arms), and I end up breaking beads with the coats shovel and using the hunter to mount and dismount most of the time. I just hate having to reseat a rim on the machine 3 times while the rim clamp just pushes it up off the machine.

    For limited use, I'd look into something like the first machine, or the samething from Coats. We should really have a tire machine at my house and if I come across a used Coats in decent shape, I will probably pick it up.
     
  4. uglytruk

    uglytruk 1/2 ton status

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    Pardon my feeble brane, but what's a "shovel style machine"? And the rim clamp "just pushes it up off the machine"? Explain???
    I've used this machine succesfully, 'cept for mags without a raised lip.

    What about the modification on the 2nd machine? I guess I should try call Coats, but then there's the malfunction I experienced. Not sure if it's the cylinder or valve (of some sort). Never had it apart. Just used it...
     
  5. Confedneck79K30

    Confedneck79K30 3/4 ton status

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    we never had a whole lotta problems breaking the lower beads, but we had an arm on the machine that let you put pressure on the top of the rim while breaking the lower bead...
     
  6. uglytruk

    uglytruk 1/2 ton status

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    What brand is it? What's wrong with this entry level-home mechanic model? Break when you beat on them? No power? Where are they made? Taiwan? China? Spare parts available???
    [​IMG] Our entry model Tire Changer, perfect for home mechanics. The TC-150 comes equiped with a Swing Arm and Automatic Styling, Manual Operation Mounting and Demounting Tool, and a Strong Pneumatic Bead Breaker.
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    [​IMG][​IMG]
    [​IMG]INCLUDES: Bead Lifting Tools; Lubrication Soap
    Tank & Brush; Hand Held Tire Inflator & Gauge;
    4 Plastic Wheel Clamp Protectors;
    Plastic Protection For Mounting
     
  7. Confedneck79K30

    Confedneck79K30 3/4 ton status

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    shovel style is the machine that you stand the tire and wheel upright with the air out and use a pedal to pull a shovel inwards to break the beads...'


    a rim clamp machine can. if not properly used or equipped with options push a rim off the clamps when you try and break the bottom beads
     
  8. uglytruk

    uglytruk 1/2 ton status

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    But I've used the stand up style machine, and the rotating plate has no provision for unseating the tire, right? Don't you hit the tire standing up, then flip it around? Then lift it onto the plate? :eek1:
     
  9. sled_dog

    sled_dog 1 ton status

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    clamp uses two rollers that squeeze in as the rim rotates to break the beads. If you had a provision that pushed down on the rim, I'm sure that would fix the issue.

    I still stand by the fact that the shovel style will do the job just fine for someone who changes tires as rarely as you and it will be cheaper.

    I just used that companies products as an example. I wouldn't buy a tire changer from them. Though I do have a lift from them, so I guess I could see my way to others of their products. I'd still look for a Coats or Hunter setup.

    The "Modification" I mentioned is very simple. Just unbolt the steel head off of the arm and bolt on the plastic one. The plastic one is less likely to scratch and gouge the rim.

    Confedneck, the top bead always breaks easier for us, then when the lower bead is trying to break all the force pushes the rim right up off the machines rubbe grip feet. I could see the "pressue on rim" being the fix, just never seen that attachment.
     
  10. sled_dog

    sled_dog 1 ton status

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    correct... what is wrong with that? Thats the most common style of tire machine out there today. I use it everyday.
     
  11. Confedneck79K30

    Confedneck79K30 3/4 ton status

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    yeah, shovel style is def most economical...
     
  12. bigjbear

    bigjbear 1 ton status Staff Member Moderator

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    ugly- my tire machine looks exactly the same as yours (top pic). Did you/your neighbor have any better luck with the other style arm (bottom pic)? Right now I just try to be super careful with Al wheels- in fact I won't do them for others anymore.

    Also, I know mine is maxed out with a 35" tire or a 10" wide rim. Any ideas for improving that? I was thinking of cutting the pipe my arm is mounted to lengenthing it???

    Mine is at least 35 yrs old, if that matters.
     
  13. uglytruk

    uglytruk 1/2 ton status

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    Yup, mine's the top one. I bought it well used (up) in 1981ish for $250. Used it in my repair shop for a few years in the early '90's, but it's miserable for alu wheels. My neighbors has a Coats installed arm. It works great, up to 35"? But that's as big as I'd ever see anyways. And last week I was struggling with a tight Michelin, and I think it crapped out... So need a bigger compressor and a lift, and heater installed... sheesh...
     

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