Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

toe in or toe out helppp

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by buzzk5, Nov 16, 2001.

  1. buzzk5

    buzzk5 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2001
    Posts:
    29
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    gimli,mb,ca
    do i need toe in or toe out, i'm thinnin out ?...i'm doing a driveway alignment,...
    can i measure the distance between the tires at the front an back of the front
    tire???....should i have the wheels off ground or ready to roll...

    Dave
    80K5 on ice

    are they all spinning?????
     
  2. doubledeuce

    doubledeuce Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2001
    Posts:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Gilbert Arizona
    When I did mine I had it on jack stands. You need toe in. Slight. Then I double checked it after I got the truck on the ground and drove it around the block. Not sure as to the exact measurement right off hand. Just my 2 cents. DD
     
  3. eastk5

    eastk5 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2001
    Posts:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Norfolk Virginia
    If I remember correctly the the toe should be set at 3/16. When i set mine I went less to reduce tire wear, but be warned, doing this makes the truck handle completely different. its been about four months since i did this and used to it now.
     
  4. Esteban86K5

    Esteban86K5 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    3,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Bakersfield, CA
    The toe in should be between 1/16 and 1/8. This is what am alignment shop told me. I did mine with the truck off the ground. Mark a center line with a nail or other sharp object and measure from there. I stuck a nail in a piece of wood and had the point sticking out. Then I painted the center of the tire with spray paint and put the piece of wood on the ground barely touching the tire. Then just give the tire a spin and there is your center line. You want it as thin as possible so your measurement will be accurate.

    <font color=blue>It's easier to teach a child than to fix an adult.</font color=blue>

    <a target="_blank" href=http://community.webshots.com/user/geltyone>Webshots Pics.</a>
     
  5. Fierospeeder

    Fierospeeder Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2001
    Posts:
    315
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Illinois
    im pretty sure you have to leave the truck on the ground to get the measurements. Because your trying to get the ideal toe while the truck is being driven. The toe changes while the suspension loads and unloads and thats why theres bumpsteer etc...

    at the alignment shops, the car tires are set on turntables and the turntables have markings on them and the tie rods are adjusted.

    74 VW Beetle
    84 Pontiac Fiero
    87 Ford Thunderbird Turbo
    83 Honda Nighthawk 550
     
  6. Twiz

    Twiz 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2001
    Posts:
    3,729
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Clearfield Ut.
    The spec is 0 deg. +/- .06 degs.
    yeah right...
    Slightly toe in. I'm not sure of an inch measurement, but slightly toe in. Bexcause, tire drag in 2wd will try to pull the tires to a toe-out condition, so compensate with a bit of toe-in. Loaded or un-loaded, shoudn't make a difference with a porperly set up soild axle front susp.

    <font color=blue>Twiz</font color=blue>
     
  7. Esteban86K5

    Esteban86K5 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    3,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Bakersfield, CA
    That's why you raise the vehicle from the axles. and it doesn't matter since your doing the tie rod not the draglink. The alingment shops have those platforms so that the wheels turn freely. Try turning the wheels with the trucks weight on them, let alone trying to adjust the tie rod ends.
    <blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr>

    The toe changes while the suspension loads and unloads and thats why theres bumpsteer etc...

    <hr></blockquote>
    the toe does not change on a solid front axle vehicle. You get the bumpsteer from the draglink to knuckle not wheel to wheel.

    <font color=blue>It's easier to teach a child than to fix an adult.</font color=blue>

    <a target="_blank" href=http://community.webshots.com/user/geltyone>Webshots Pics.</a>
     
  8. Fierospeeder

    Fierospeeder Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2001
    Posts:
    315
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Illinois
    so then bumpsteer doesn't exist at all because the suspension never loads or unloads and thats why correction isn't when the truck is lifted.

    thats why its called bumpsteer, the wheels hit a bump, it alters the angle of the axle and it changes the geometry of the steering. When the axle changes angle, it is no longer parellel with the steering components.

    same thing with a car. bumpsteer is the change in the toe setting as the wheels move up and down. And to fix it is to move the locations of the steering linkage pivot points and or change the lengths fo the tie rods.

    74 VW Beetle
    84 Pontiac Fiero
    87 Ford Thunderbird Turbo
    83 Honda Nighthawk 550
     
  9. Esteban86K5

    Esteban86K5 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    3,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Bakersfield, CA
    <blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr>

    thats why its called bumpsteer, the wheels hit a bump, it alters the angle of the axle and it changes the geometry of the steering

    <hr></blockquote>

    I agree with you that it changes the geometry of the steering, but it does not change your toe in or toe out. You can have your driver's side tire stuffed into the fender and the passenger side dropped down 18 inches and the tires would have the same toe measurment as if both tires were flat on the ground. The bumpsteer comes from the axle moving closer to the frame therefore moving closer to the steering box. That is when you get the bumpsteer in your steering wheel. And that is why you adjust it when you put a lift on the truck. you don't adjust your tie rod when you lift it. You adjust your drag link.

    <font color=blue>It's easier to teach a child than to fix an adult.</font color=blue>

    <a target="_blank" href=http://community.webshots.com/user/geltyone>Webshots Pics.</a>
     
  10. chevyracing

    chevyracing 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2001
    Posts:
    2,589
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Colorado
    If you drive down the road with your tires on the ground then align it on the ground. If you drive down the road with your tires jacked up then jack it up when youalign it.....

    John

    Like to go sloppin' 'round in da mud in a rapid fashion....=)

    <a target="_blank" href=http://coloradok5.com/gallery/albun31?&page=1>See my pics here</a>
     
  11. BorregoK5

    BorregoK5 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2001
    Posts:
    2,457
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    San Marcos, Ca USA
    It's most common that a rear wheel drive vehicle runs the front tires toed in a bit as the drag of the road pushes them out. A front wheel drive vehicle runs the tires slightly toed out becuase the tires will toe themselves in a bit when pulling the vehicle. Many 4x4 manufactures run a one tooth lower gear in the front axle than the rear (dodge is infamous for this) and depending what you do with your truck this might be for you but keep in mind that this might create a front wheel drive condition as above if the majority of your driving is in AWD. If you usually drive in 2WD (like a part time kit would allow) then set it like a rear wheel drive vehicle.

    I started with nothing and I still have most of that left! - <a target="_blank" href=http://www.echobit.com:81/k5/> Pictures</a>
     

Share This Page