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torque question...

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by Steve88, Mar 22, 2000.

  1. Steve88

    Steve88 1/2 ton status

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    No, not the what is HP vs. Torque question again...

    Rather I'm in the market for a torque wrench. Only been to Home Depot and the auto-parts stores so far. Funny thing is the last one I remember having (broke a while ago) had both Ft lbs and Inch lbs on it. I can't find one that has both scales.

    a) Recommendations on a good brand of torque wrench?
    b) Click type vs. read-the-dial? (I like the click type)
    c) Conversion chart to convert ft lbs to inch lbs? (Just divide by 12?)



    <font color=red>Steve88</font color=red>[​IMG]
    88K5 Silverado
    thunderdog@metallica.com
     
  2. Burt4x4

    Burt4x4 3/4 ton status

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    For years now I have used the Sears Craftsman Click style.
    It has worked for me everytime!
    I was told to get an inch lb. click style seporate the combo styles are not acurate from what I hear. no first hand experience though.
    Hey at least Sears will replace it if anything goes wrong and thier stores are in almost every city.
    Good Luck
    Burt4x4

    Rock ON!
     
  3. delta9blazer

    delta9blazer 1/2 ton status

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    can't help you on anything but the footpounds vs. inchpounds.
    ITS WAY MORE INVOLVED THAN DIVIDING OR MULTIPLYING BY TWELVE.
    i toasted a KZ440 engine doing the multiplication method on the head bolts.
    or, that IS the correct way, and i'm a doofus.
    your call.

    <font color=purple>delta9blazer</font color=purple>
     
  4. Steve88

    Steve88 1/2 ton status

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    Delta9, I don't know you well enough to call you a doofus, but if it makes you feel any better...

    Yeah, Burt, I was thinking craftsman as well, but HomeDepot's are also everywhere, and offer the same lifetime guarenty on their Husky line, PLUS they're a block away from my house. Otherwise Sears is 20 minutes away. They're building a new Lowes though even closer than HomeD so maybe I'll just wait.

    I really thought that the one I used to have had foot-lbs on the front of it and inch-lbs on the back of it so you just looked at whichever side and adjusted it from there. It was the click type... I'll try to find a formula online if possible and post it...

    <font color=red>Steve88</font color=red>[​IMG]
    88K5 Silverado
    thunderdog@metallica.com
     
  5. Burt4x4

    Burt4x4 3/4 ton status

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    Cool
    that would be good info to add to my collection.
    I forget who told me but a torque wrench designed for ftlbs
    is not going to be sensitive enough for inlbs messurements and thats why it is suggested to get two seporate torque wrenches.
    Keep us posted
    Later
    Burt4x4

    Rock ON!
     
  6. AZK5

    AZK5 1/2 ton status

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    A Craftsmen torque wrench only has a 90 day warranty.
    CB
     
  7. Steve88

    Steve88 1/2 ton status

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    Well some quick searches found the following amazing site:

    http://www.mathformulas.com

    The quick calculator on the right is especially usefull. And if I've understood it correctly it's inch/lbs * 12 = ft/lbs.

    I'm surprised on the Craftsman only having a 90 day warr...

    <font color=red>Steve88</font color=red>[​IMG]
    88K5 Silverado
    thunderdog@metallica.com
     
  8. jarheadk5

    jarheadk5 1/2 ton status

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    Being an aircraft mechanic, torque wrenches are my best friends (or worst enemies, depending on where the fastener to be TQ'd is!) so I do know a bit about em. Having said that, I'll now step up on my much-used soapbox and present myself as a target...
    1. Unless you're rebuilding your (or your buddy's) motor, tranny, or diff on a regular basis, there really isn't any need to buy anything more expensive than a Craftsman. For general use, they're great.
    2. Click-type is MUCH easier to use; dial-indicating is usually found on more accurate (read:EXPENSIVE) models, and is generally a pain in the a$$ to use properly, due to something called parallax. If you have some dire need to know more about parallax, send me a private and I'll explain more.
    3. As stated earlier, in/lbs x 12 = ft/lbs
    ft/lbs / 12 = in/lbs
    For those of you who already own a TQ wrench, the metrology technicians (guys who service & calibrate precision measuring equipment) I know have a quick method to ensure your TQ wrench stays in calibration longer. Run the adjusting sleeve all the way up to the maximum rated TQ for the wrench, then run it back down to the minimum rated TQ. <font color=red> DO NOT EXCEED THESE MARKINGS EVER!! <font color=black> Do this twice the first time, then monthly after. Store them at the min. TQ setting and treat them well, they'll treat you well right back.
    Okay, I'll step down now. That was quite enough...

    [​IMG] Semper Maintenance!
     
  9. Jason73K5

    Jason73K5 1/2 ton status

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    Jarhead is right on on all points. I'm also a helicopter mechanic and use craftsman click-type wrenches for my car stuff. I've actually had more problems with the much more expensive Snap-On torque wrenches than any other type, so price doesn't mean everything. I've never seen inch pounds and foot pounds on the same wrench, but foot pounds and newton meters on the same wrench is fairly common. Also, most torque wrenches are much less accurate in the top and bottom ten percent or so of their range.
     
  10. Eagle86K5

    Eagle86K5 1/2 ton status

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    I downloaded the Master Converter from the following web site.http://www.savard.com/downloads/mc32.exe<font color=blue>

    According to the program 12 inch/lbs =1 foot/lb<font color=black>

    <font color=green>Eagle86K5[​IMG]

    <font color=red>Only guy I know that can get out of line in a one car funeral
     
  11. Steve88

    Steve88 1/2 ton status

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    Great info guys. Thanks much.

    Yup, that old one I owned (until it broke on me) had ft/lbs+nm's on the front of the bar and inch/lbs+nm's on the back. Being that it was the click type it of course had the micrometer type of adjustment. It was something like 4 complete turns to go up 10 ft/lbs at a time, which on the back scale equated to 1 turn = 30 inch lbs or something like that. It was a while back, but I remember it working something like that.

    The formula is easy enough but all the wrenches I've seen so far go 10 - 100 inch pounds or 25 - 250 ft lbs. With 25 ft lbs = 300 inch lbs the calculation is pretty useless since the lowest setting on a ft lbs wrench is already higher than any inch lbs setting. (For example the torque on the tranny fluid cover bolts is supposed to be 120 inch lbs, which is already below the lowest setting on all the ft lb wrenches I've seen.) Although I stil can't believe the torque on those tranny cover bolts is only a little more than finger tight (10 ft lbs)...(at least it says that in the Haynes manual)

    <font color=red>Steve88</font color=red>[​IMG]
    88K5 Silverado
    thunderdog@metallica.com
     
  12. jarheadk5

    jarheadk5 1/2 ton status

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    Yeah, sometimes the TQ's listed for things sound crazy, but there's a method to the madness. The listed TQ for a fastener seldom has to do with the parts the hardware is installed on. It has to do with the max TQ that can be applied to a particular fastener before tensile (pulling) failure of the threads or shank. Obviously there are exceptions to this rule, but aren't there always??

    Pearl of Wisdom - Try your d@mndest to find a TQ for everything, use a TQ wrench on it, and you'll rarely strip or break hardware. Perfection is in the details...

    [​IMG] Semper Maintenance!
    [​IMG] So many ideas, so little money...
     

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