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torque wrenches and torque specs

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by 77Jimmy, Sep 12, 2002.

  1. 77Jimmy

    77Jimmy 1/2 ton status

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    Hope this is the right forum for this. Since it’s The Garage, seems like the right place. Anyway…bought my first 4x4 and am in the process of gathering all my weapons before going in to battle. Am curious…
    1. How many torque wrenches do you have and what kind are they (clicker, etc)? Or do you have one torque wrench you use for everything, whether it’s changing a spark plug or removing the driveshaft?
    2. How closely do you pay attention to the torque specs? Do you go by the bible on everything or just certain things like spark plugs?
    3. Lastly, where did you get your wrenches – any recommendations?

    Keep in mind that I'm a diy working out of my home garage. /forums/images/icons/grin.gif
    Thanks.
     
  2. txbluethunder

    txbluethunder 1/2 ton status

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    sears special, its the half inch up to 120ft/lbs i think. i tend to break things easily so i try to use it anywhere i can fit it.

    torque wrench
     
  3. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    I use the torque wrench for the more critical parts of my truck. I have a beam type torque wrench for big stupid stuf and borrow my buddy's clicker Torque wrenches for more critical stuff. He has two torque wrenches, the smaller one is 3/8" drive and reads in inch pounds. It's good for small stuff obviously. The larger one is 1/2" drive and reads in foot pounds...for bigger stuff. Generally if a torque spec is given I'll torque it to spec...although for valve covers etc I tighten it up by feel.

    Both his torque wrenches are Craftsman...perfect balance of quality and value for the DIY'er.

    A note on torque wrenches...they should be reset to '0' after each use. If you leave tension on them they will not be correctly calibrated the next time you use them.

    Rene
     
  4. BowtieBlazer

    BowtieBlazer 1/2 ton status

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    I'll second the craftsman 120ftlb wrench. I follow lots of things to torque specs to the dot. Its the only sure way to get an even clean seal on gaskets and no way i'd have tightened my fly wheel down with out one. Or rebuilt my t-case for that matter. The clicker type seems to be handy enough for everything. Funny thing is one of the few things I dont use it for is spark plugs. I thred them in by hand then tighten them just a little more with a socket.
     
  5. Leadfoot

    Leadfoot 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    I have a Craftsman 1/2" drive and an Autozone 3/8" drive (both guaranteed). I usually use my built in torque wrench (arm) unless I am doing critical work such as head bolts, or mating aluminum (easily stripped). I also borrow a "dial" indicator torque wrench when setting up ring and pinions as the "standard" torque wrench is not designed for "rolling resistance" torque, but that is something you should only have to deal with for R&P's. A decent 1/2" Ft/Lbs torque wrench and a decent 3/8" In/Lbs torque wrench should get you through 97+% of what you will need.

    Again to re-iterate what Rene said as it is VERY important for torque wrenches to stay calibrated is to set them back to Zero when finished!
     
  6. fortcollinsram

    fortcollinsram 1/2 ton status

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    I have a 3/8" Craftsman torque wrench that goes to 75# that I picked up for like $39.99 on sale and I have a Matco 1/2" Torque wrench that goes to 250# I picked up the Matco for about $90 so it was worth it...I would not pay the $230 retail on it however...

    Chris
     
  7. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    I have two Snap-On ones....a 3/8" (good up to about 120 ft/lbs) and a 1/2" (good up to 250 ft/lbs)

    I got them because Scott (4x4HIGH) wouldn't help me rebuild my engine without decent torque wrenches! /forums/images/icons/grin.gif It was still cheaper than buying a new engine, and now I have nice tools for the rest of my life!!!!

    They are the "clicker" style, and are most accurate near the "middle" of their operating range, so if I'm torquing something to around 120 Ft/Lbs I'll use the middle setting of the 1/2" drive, instead of max-ing out the 3/8 drive one.

    Having TWO is a bit extravagant, if you only bought one, I'd say go for the 1/2" one that can torque the BIG stuff, like U-Bolts and Lugnuts. Those are important to get right.

    /forums/images/icons/cool.gif
     
  8. Mobile_Mechanic

    Mobile_Mechanic Registered Member

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    I have 5 torque wrenches (yeah, I know). Snap-On tools.
    Small dial face, 1/4 drive, in inch pounds,
    Small clicky 3/8 drive, to 120 ft pounds,
    2 medium clicky, 1/2 inch drive, to 250 ft pounds
    And one LARGE clicky, 3/4 inch drive, to 650 ft pounds.
    I use them for critical stuff like engines, transmissions and setting up rears.
    Everything else is by my calibrated elbow.
     

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