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Transfer case?

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by wheelnut46, Dec 8, 2001.

  1. wheelnut46

    wheelnut46 1/2 ton status

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    Location:
    Rhode Island
    Please forgive the ameteur question but all of my other 4x4 trucks were the same:
    2H
    4H
    N
    4L
    or close to it.
    This new 77 Jimmy (350, automatic) of mine has Warn locking hubs that somebody put in, but the transfer case shift is marked:
    L-LOC
    L
    N
    H
    H-LOC
    or something like that.
    Since it isnt full time anymore - what position is 2 high? 4 high? 4 low? what is all this "LOC" stuff?
     
  2. Tatman

    Tatman Registered Member

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    Location:
    Indiana
    Marked the same as my old one....... if so...

    L-loc= 4Lo
    L=2Lo
    N=Neutral
    H=2Hi(Normal Driving)
    H-Loc=4Hi

    the "LOC" stuff is 4-wheel drive, and if you have manual hubs as I do, it means time to get out into the weather to loc them in, unless you keep them locked when the snow flies

    Brian
    <a target="_blank" href=http://www.saddletramps.com/BlazerK5.htm>www.saddletramps.com/BlazerK5.htm</a>
     
  3. Blazer_Boy

    Blazer_Boy 1/2 ton status

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    Location:
    Sioux City, IA, USA
    The "LOC" refers to how the power is divided. Its similar to an open carrier differential, where the side with the least traction gets all the power. With the transfer out of LOC it has a chance to divided power to keep the transfer case from tearing it self apart. With it in LOC, both driveshafts are receiving equal power. Thats why you're only supposed to use LOC on slippy surfaces so things can spin a bit and keep stresses down. Not good on normal pavement, but great on low traction surfaces. When you have the lock outs disengaged, you run the truck in LOC otherwise all the power is going to go to the front (least resistance) and you wont move. The front drive shaft will spin at an equal rate with the rear, but since the front is not moving the tires, the stress is reduced.

    <a target="_blank" href=http://new.wavlist.com/movies/031/ag-blow.wav>"I ain't nobody, dork."</a>
    <a target="_blank" href=http://www.geocities.com/bigkern76>http://www.geocities.com/bigkern76</a>
     

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