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Triple stick for Doubler Question

Discussion in 'OffRoad Design' started by WOLF359, Mar 30, 2003.

  1. WOLF359

    WOLF359 Registered Member

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    Stephen,

    I went out tonight, pulled my203/205 Doubler and twinned the 205.

    All good.

    I've made the new shifter for the 205by just making anothor lever and pivot, copying your design for the twin stick. My question is the shift rail for the rear (the one closest to the front input and rear output (the one you modify), can you show or tell me how you guys ran the linkage so that it won't just pivot on the shift rail.

    I just cut the stock linkage in half. But when I was putting it back together tonight, I can see that it will just pivot on the shift rail when the lever is pulled. I haven't had a chance to look at it hard, but thought I would ask what you guys have done. I guess I could just weld it to the shift rail, but I don't really want to.

    Thanks in advance.

    Tim.
     
  2. Alaska Offroad

    Alaska Offroad Registered Member

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    Tim, I have a suggestion for you.

    Find a piece of pipe, or tubing that will slip over the shift rail. Drill a hole through the tubing for a bolt, then weld the tab to the side of the tubing. I made some like this for mine a while back, but never welded them together. For now Im doing it like this....

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The longer tab is bolted into the shift rail. You unfortunately cannot see this in the pic, but I welded a piece of flat stock across the top of the tab right up tight against the side of the shift lever. That welded flat stock is what is currently preventing the tab from rotating out like you mention.
     
  3. Alaska Offroad

    Alaska Offroad Registered Member

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    LOL, this got me started again. I thought I had some pics of the tubes I made, but I couldnt find them so I went out and took some more.

    [​IMG]
    In this pic you can see the blobs welded to the top of the tabs. You can also see the tubes that I made for the new design. They still need to have the tabs welded on them, but I think you would get the point.

    [​IMG]
    This image shows the tabs that Im going to weld to the side of the tube. They will have a 90* bend in them.
     
  4. Stephen

    Stephen 1/2 ton status Moderator Vendor

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    We have a little more elegant solution but I can't spill the beans just yet. We have messed around with just welding an "L" shaped piece directly onto a really stiff shift tube, using the "L" shaped flatbar to go around the corner. It tries to deflect when you push and pull but if it's cut out of strong material and tied to a stiff tube, it's acceptable. We were concerned about the weight of something heavy enough to do the job hanging on the rail and trying to twist it down which could push the shift fork against the shift ring.
     
  5. Alaska Offroad

    Alaska Offroad Registered Member

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    damn dude. if its more elegant, and you cant show it, it aint [censored]. /forums/images/graemlins/blush.gif your not baggin on my super custom, bling bling, uber-fab'ed, booger welded, hack job are ya? /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

    Just kidding man, I know its a bit ugly, but it works. Thats my first shot at it anyway, prototype you might say. One of those things that ends up being set on the back burner for work on other projects.


    I dont see how a heavy object (how heavy could it really be anyway) could push the fork onto the ring. The rail is supported by the case on both ends.
     
  6. Alaska Offroad

    Alaska Offroad Registered Member

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    Here is how the adapter will be constructed. The tubes were CNC machined from 4140 TGP Bar Stock. The bore of the "tube" fits over the shift rail with a .001" clearance fit. The tabs were CNC machined from 1/4" T1 Steel Plate. To be "elegant" I suppose they need to be tig welded and powder coated. ? So be it. I will do just that. What color should they be? Maybe I will start all over and machine them all in one piece from solid billet 300m?

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Alaska Offroad

    Alaska Offroad Registered Member

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    Tim, this pic shows the old adapter with the flat stock welded on it to prevent it from pivoting around the bolt. (sitting on the top of the 203)

    [​IMG]

    also I was wondering what the fitting size on your cutting brake is. I want to use the same brake, but have one cylinder for the front axle, and one for the rear. (if the lines are big enough)
     
  8. WOLF359

    WOLF359 Registered Member

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    Brook, that is trick and killer, and will work great.

    After I posted and before you replied, I was standing at the counter at Princess Auto and found a nice tube sleeve with a threaded hole in it. It's about 1/4 narrower than what you built, but does the exact same thing. It was $1.38. /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

    So I hacked the stock bracket off and welded it to the tube sleeve, and got a longer bolt that goes through both of the tangs on the shifter rod and secures it. It's a 3/4 id sleeve, and there is a "slight" bit of play on the rod, but you can barely move it.

    It works perfect. It's not tigged and powdercoated, but hey, it shifts, and that's all that counts.

    Thanks for the reply's guys. And Stephen, thanks for the initial design on the shifters. I made the third one exactly like yours. /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

    I'll get some pics put up.

    Tim.
     
  9. WOLF359

    WOLF359 Registered Member

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    [ QUOTE ]

    also I was wondering what the fitting size on your cutting brake is. I want to use the same brake, but have one cylinder for the front axle, and one for the rear. (if the lines are big enough)

    [/ QUOTE ]

    I used 1/4 hardline 45 degree double flare fittings throughout.

    I removed the fittings that came with it at the cutting brake, and replaced them with 90 deg elbows (so I could run my hard lines direct down through the floor). These were also 1/4
     
  10. Stephen

    Stephen 1/2 ton status Moderator Vendor

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    I think my valve uses 1/4" lines in and 3/16 lines going out. That's factory size and worked OK through my prop. valve, line lock, and the cutting brakes.
     
  11. Alaska Offroad

    Alaska Offroad Registered Member

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    stephen: Thanks for the info, but whats OK mean? It could have been better?
     
  12. Alaska Offroad

    Alaska Offroad Registered Member

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    The reason I ask is that I would like to use one cutting brake for the front axle, and one for the rear. My rear is welded, So it wont do me any good to use one for each tire.
     
  13. Stephen

    Stephen 1/2 ton status Moderator Vendor

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    The style valve I have takes one line in and sends 2 out, it sounds to me like you need to put a single line lock on the front and rear lines individually or get two manual masters so you can operate them by had individually. I use an elec. line lock in the front and it works pretty well, I don't use it much. I like the feel of the manual masters for the rear brakes but sometimes it's hard to get enough pressure from them, I have to pump it up a little with the foot brake, then capture the pressure with the manual valve and add to it. Not big deal, just a learned skill.
    I'd find a jamar, wilwood, CNC catalog and see what you have available.

    Thought about using individual pedals on individual masters? Put them close together and make sure you stomp both most of the time.
     
  14. Alaska Offroad

    Alaska Offroad Registered Member

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    Stephen: I have thought about using individual pedals and master cylinders, especially since Im running an Auto, I could easily deal with and extra pedal. I guess I just dont want to deal with fabricating the linkage and mounts under my dash. Not enough time, and too lazy I guess.

    I want to get the cutting brakes cause I think it would be fun to mess around with, but I think a single line lock is more of what I need. The advantage I saw with hand operated cutting brakes was speed and ease of use. If your having to pump up the brakes with your foot, and then grab the cutting brake, I cant imagine that being a very fluid motion, or being "Fast".

    Maybe there is a demand for a bigger cutting brake? One with a 1" bore, and a longer stroke?
     
  15. Stephen

    Stephen 1/2 ton status Moderator Vendor

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    Actually I need a smaller bore to build more pressure, I have room to throw it farther. I could use a longer lever to get the same effect. And it really works well in most situations, I don't have to use the pump and hold technique much.
     

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