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troubleshooting tools

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by aknight_sa, Aug 22, 2006.

  1. aknight_sa

    aknight_sa 1/2 ton status

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    hey guys,

    what are the must have tools for troubleshooting which everyone must have?

    troubleshooting any kind of problem that might happen anywhere in the truck

    Thanks,
     
  2. DEMON44

    DEMON44 Low-Tech Redneck

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    #1- experience


    #2- Do all your own work, then you'll will know what to fix when something stops working.


    #3- experience
     
  3. aknight_sa

    aknight_sa 1/2 ton status

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    i am seeking experience!!!

    i still dont know where to start on it.. also, i want some tools that can help me pin point where a problem is... for example a timing gun, vacuum gauge,...

    if you have experience which you would like to share.. then please do!

    if there was anyone around me that knows the stuff very well.. i will pay him to teach me as much as he can!
     
  4. aknight_sa

    aknight_sa 1/2 ton status

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    anyone know a good air/fuel ratio gauge that comes with an oxygen sensor...
     
  5. Slapperbar

    Slapperbar Retired Navy NDT Examiner Premium Member

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    Vacuum gage
    amp/volt meter
    Det. cord
     
  6. 4X4HIGH

    4X4HIGH 1 ton status Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    For engine diagnosis you should have a timing light, compression gauge, fuel gauge, leakdown gauge and vacuum pressure gauge.

    For anything electrical you should have a good DVOM (digital volt ohm meter), and a test light.
     
  7. fireplug

    fireplug 1/2 ton status

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    What's a det cord?
     
  8. Slapperbar

    Slapperbar Retired Navy NDT Examiner Premium Member

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    DETonation cord, blow some sheeat up.:D
    I forgot a timing light.
     
  9. fireplug

    fireplug 1/2 ton status

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    LOL:doah::haha:
     
  10. 1985_K5_Silverado

    1985_K5_Silverado 1/2 ton status

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    1. Vacuum gauge. They can tell you quite a bit.

    2. Spark tester. I have a Lisle pen-looking thing with an inductive groove that you just hold against a plug wire, and if it's getting zap, the light flashes.

    3. Infrared pyrometer (thermometer). Not as precise as a contact probe, and my cheapie doesn't have emissivity adjustment, but it's great for comparing one temp to another, or seeing if a temp is just way out of wack. Good for checking the temps of the header tubes when the engine is running (look for the way low or high temp tube). Also good for checking temp at the rear of a catcon vs the temp at the front. Check the temp of your front or rear diff housing, or your transfer case housing temp. Use your imagination!

    4. Fuel pressure gauge. Look for out-of-range pressure.

    5. Tire pressure gauge.

    6. Timing light, maybe one with a tach and dwell meter built in.

    For newer vehicles, or older ones that still have an ECM:

    Code reader. You can get a decent cheapie that just reads trouble codes, or spend more for one that reads both OBDI and OBDII codes (and possibly CAN) as well as deciphering the codes and telling you what they mean in plain language, and has all the connector cables for different makes. Only worth it if you need it for one of your vehicles, or if you just have some cash to burn.
     

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