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Tubing for gas brakes tranny

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by lukerz, Jun 21, 2001.

  1. lukerz

    lukerz 1/2 ton status

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    I will be installing all my lines new. I want to know what would be the correct tubing sizes and cheapest materials. Where do I purchase this tubing? PS no stainless I will be flaring all lines myself. Thanks all
    Lukers

    83 K10 from 76 K5 & 83 C10
    Th350 Np203 355 CID
    31 X 10.5
    Plan on 2" body lift
     
  2. Leadfoot

    Leadfoot 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    Whatever you do, don't go too "cheap". Those are the life-line of your vehicle and you, especially the brake lines. Steering and brakes are two areas you definitely don't want to cut corners (no pun intended). You do not have to go stainless (as you say you don't want to because of flaring issues), but whichever you choose try www.InlineTube.com (they have OEM steel and stainless lines and I used them for ALL my lines and are great). They have all prebent brake, fuel, vacuum, modulator, fuel, and tranny lines with all correct OEM fittings and springwrap and a large selection of straight lengths, coils, fittings, and springwrap. Give them a call with your application and they will tell you exactly what you need, whether you decide to go prebent or do it yourself. Also try www.ClassicTube.com. If you don't go with Inline tube and want to go non-stainless, get high quality steel lines from a well established company. This way you will know the quality, it won't rot in a year, and the fittings will be quality. Plus high quality lines flare better (been there done that, then decided to go stainless). Before you start, price out what it will cost in lines, fittings, springwrap (if you can even find it), flaring tools, bending equipment, MISTAKES (there are always some), and then price aftermarket prebent lines in Stainless and Steel and you will be amazed at how close the costs may be (depending on where you get your supplies, unless you get a good discount somewhere on straight piping and fittings). Figure in cutting, bending, figuring out which fittings to use, making sure nothing rubs, pulls, or twists and the fact that prebent lines are "plug and play" plus most are warranteed, you may actually (in the end) make out better with prebent.
    Remember that these carry some of the most important fluids in the vehicle. If gas goes everywhere, you will have big problems, same as if tranny lines go, and especially if brake lines go. I just don't want to hear somebody died because they used poor quality lines just to save a buck or two. Well now that I am off my soapbox I will say that the choice is yours, you have to feel comfortable with whatever you choose.

    If you didn't built it yourself, how can you call it yours.......?
     
  3. lukerz

    lukerz 1/2 ton status

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    OK thanks for the info. It looks like I will buy straight length line and do all the fittings with oem. Now for the questions. What are the threads and tubing sizes for a 76 12 bolt rear d44 front calipers and 76 1/2 ton master cylinder. Same questions for tranny line fittings and sizes and fuel fittings.
    Thanks
    Lukers

    83 K10 from 76 K5 & 83 C10
    Th350 Np203 355 CID
    31 X 10.5
    Plan on 2" body lift
     
  4. Leadfoot

    Leadfoot 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    To be honest I can't remember for sure, but you can do what I did. I wasn't sure which route to go at first (premade or make my own), so I decided at first to find out what I needed if I were to do it myself by calling 1-800-385-9452 and asking for tech support. Tell them that you are planning to replace the fuel, tranny, brake, vacuum, etc lines and will do the cutting, bending, flaring yourself. Then give them year/make/model of vehicle and keep a pad and pen handy. They will tell you how much straight length and sizes you need as well as fittings. You don't have to buy from them, but at least you will have all the specs plus you can get a price from them and go shopping elsewhere to compare.

    If you didn't built it yourself, how can you call it yours.......?
     

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