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two more questions, but what the heck

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by big d, Aug 14, 2002.

  1. big d

    big d 1/2 ton status

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    i wondering if there is any merit in having two block heaters for winter time use. i have no garage and my vehicle starting is prime importantence. how about one in the lower rad hose and the other in a heater hose. would this work....would they fight each other ? next question...i just found in the summit catalog a fuel line cooler, is there any merit to this ? it seems i ran across some discussion about this on here awhile back. any comment ? thanks ahead of time. /forums/images/icons/cool.gif /forums/images/icons/grin.gif
     
  2. Sandman

    Sandman 3/4 ton status Author

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    I've never needed more than one (block heater). If your going to do two, Do a water heater of some kind(block or hose) and get a battery warmer. The battery warmer should help the starting. The water heater does make a big difference.

    I doubt that the fuel line cooler would get you much in your application. They buy you small amounts out at the dragstrip where every tenth counts. I used an ice driven one on my Chevelle at the strip and I was never certain that it did much. I never did vapor lock though.
     
  3. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    I don't think block heaters will "fight" each other. I know on the Olds diesels,the block heaters were in the "freeze" plugs of the block. Probably wouldn't hurt to keep the radiator warm either, but if you have enough antifreeze in the system, the radiator temp won't matter.

    If it's that cold, you need to be worried about the oil thickening up. AFAIK, in almost any climate, you can buy antifreeze that will prevent freezing, but there isn't much you can do to help oil, except keep it warm.
     
  4. wrathORC

    wrathORC 1/2 ton status

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    I don't know how cold it gets for you. Here most mornings I go outside it's between -10° and 26°. Usually it's in the single digits. It stays like this from late October through late April.

    A block heater will help. One to go in the lower radiator hose is best. A 1500 watt one is what I'd get. I'd put it on a timer so it starts 15-30 minutes before you go out to start it. I'm not a real believer in the whole "leave it on all night" thing. First, we have a pretty steady wind. My truck gets parked next to a federal highway so it's always getting wind blown by it. It faces north so the northwest wind blows right in the radiator. A block heater would be a waste of money all night long.

    A battery tray heater is a good idea but I recommend just running two batteries in the 850CCA range. If you want just one run a single 1000+CCA battery.

    I, myself, just run a single good battery (will have two by this winter) and keep the heat riser tube sucking hot air from around the exhaust. I also keep my choke adjusted perfectly. Usually all it takes is one pump of the accelerator and she sparks right up. It takes 7-10 minutes to get to operating temperature. However on those -20 to 0° days I do get in the truck and crank on it so I'm not losing amps to the courtesy lights.


    Fuel line cooler, now this is a peculiar idea. It works great if your fuel is getting hot somewhere. I don't know about you but the only chance my fuel has to get hot is along the framerail. And when I put my hand there while my truck is running my hand doesn't get hot.

    The only place I can think of fuel getting heated is when we've got mechanical fuel pumps. I have an electric one mounted on the firewall. I imagine you could run a fuel line right from the mechanical fuel pump to the fuel cooler and then avoid the block all the way back to the carb. Chances are the fuel will actually get more warm by going to a cooler because of all the extra time it spends in the engine compartment.

    My friend ran a wheelwell mounted cooler with two fans blowing through it (blew air from the wheelwell into the hood). This brought the temperature of the fuel down to whatever the track temperature was. I ended up building him an el-cheapo dry ice (solid CO2) fuel cooler. It worked pretty good but as we all know when it sublimates on your skin it doesn't feel any too good.
     

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