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U-joint question

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by chev4life, Feb 22, 2004.

  1. chev4life

    chev4life 1/2 ton status

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    Ok guys, I got my 14ff and dana44 and am getting prepped for a weekend install. The guy I got them from threw in his old driveshaft that had the conversions u-joint on it but it seemed to be really tight on the driveshaft...they should be rotate smooth as butter right, but with no shake? So I figure screw it, I will get another one and install it on my driveshaft....then I look at it....how do I install a new u-joint? Anything I should look for?
    Oh..know it has been asked...I am going stock 1/2 ton to 14ff..the ujoint I need is either Neapco #2-1153 or Napa 447 right???
     
  2. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

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    Yes.

    See my post in the tech articles forum on this.
     
  3. heavy4x4

    heavy4x4 1/2 ton status

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    Yes, you need Napa 447.

    [ QUOTE ]
    how do I install a new u-joint?

    [/ QUOTE ]

    1) Remove driveshaft from truck.

    2) If the u-joint is the same one that came with the truck from the factory (not uncommon...mine was when I replaced it at 160,000 miles), you'll have to burn out the injected plastic that's there to hold the caps in. To do this, just take a propane torch to the ears of the driveshaft near the caps and you'll see black plastic start to melt/purge/pop out. Wear safety glasses and long sleeves...that shiat's hot, trust me.

    3) If it's a replacement u-joint, you'll need to remove the locking clips that hold the caps on - the clips are located on the inside of the ears of the driveshaft. You'll see them once you get through the years of built-up crud. To remove, poke/pry/pound on them - you won't need to reuse them, so do whatever it takes.

    4) If you have access to a press, use that to press out the u-joints. Otherwise, use the following method that I've used several times with success. Set the two ends of the u-joint that were attached to the axle up on an open vise or on some blocks of wood. Then, with a 3 lb hammer, hit on the ear of the driveshaft yoke - as close to the u-joint cap as you can. Don't hit the hollow part of the shaft, or you'll dent it. By pounding on it like this, you'll force the u-joint up into the cap that you're looking at, and it will come out eventually. Then, rotate the d-shaft 180 degrees and pound on the otherside to get the other cap out.

    5) Take your new u-joint and take off the two caps that will be used on the d-shaft side. Be careful of the needle bearings...they can fall out, but there is usually enough grease in the caps to hold them in. But, the caps are not supplied with an adequate amount of grease to install them as-is. So, take a little bit of bearing grease and put it in each one of the caps. If you don't have a greaseable u-joint, don't put too much in, otherwise you won't be able to press the caps all the way down because it will be "grease-locked". If you have greaseable joints, you can still do this step and leave the grease zerk off, or once it's all put together, just grease the joint through the zerk fitting.

    6) The new u-joint can now go in. Feed the capless u-joint through the holes in the yoke of the d-shaft. Then, put each of the caps on. Again, be careful with the needle bearings, as you don't want any of them to fall over. Now, if you have a large c-clamp, use that to push the caps down on the u-joint enough to get the inner-locking clips on. If you don't have a c-clamp, a hammer works well.

    7) Install the clips, and before you put the d-shaft back in the truck, do one more thing. The method I mentioned in #4, do that again, but this time with the caps and clips installed. Don't wail on it, but hit it enough so that the inner clips will be firmly against the inner walls of the d-shaft yoke. The reason for this step is that if the caps are putting a lot of pressure on the ends of the u-joint, you'll get premature u-joint failure (from heat).

    8) Install d-shaft back in truck.

    /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  4. chev4life

    chev4life 1/2 ton status

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    Awesome dude, thanks for the info! /forums/images/graemlins/peace.gif /forums/images/graemlins/waytogo.gif
     
  5. heavy4x4

    heavy4x4 1/2 ton status

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