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valve timing & bleed down

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by dmanblazer, Sep 16, 2004.

  1. dmanblazer

    dmanblazer 1/2 ton status

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    /forums/images/graemlins/1zhelp.gifI have a fresh rebuilt 350, when I set the marks on the timing gears they were on the cam at 6:00 and on the crank at 12:00, and that's where I started to adjust my valve lash, and after trying to start the engine well you know what happened. I thought my dist. was out 180 so I put it back on what I thought was #1 TDC and re stabbed the dist. back to #1 pos. it started but ran rough, that's when I found out what I had done. So is all I have to do is turn the dist. back 180, loosen my rocker arms, then find #6 TDC, turn the crank 1 rev. reposition my dist. to #1 TDC and then adjust my valve lash again? I have given this much thought, I'm trying not to have to pull the radiator and everything off the engine again.

    Now for lifter bleed down, any recommendations on how to bleed down the lifters before I adjust valve lash? Everything I have read on this subject says not to soak these new hydraulic lifters in oil before installation. When trying to start the engine and getting it to run for about a minute at max, my lifters have filled with oil. Would this be a problem or not? This is my first total rebuild so I'm just trying to get as much information as possible. /forums/images/graemlins/usaflag.gif /forums/images/graemlins/k5.gif


    Thanks, Jeff
     
  2. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    "Pumping up" the lifters before setting the valves has been discussed in depth here. Pretty much the consensus was, what works for you, works.

    If you tear down an engine ithat has been running, you have no choice but to set it with the lifters "pumped up". I just did mine last night, and some lifters obviously still were pumped up, as the half-turn-tight-past-drag-on-pushrod setting on some lifters resulted in zero play in the rocker, while some didn't tighten up very much at all, and had a "lot" (comparatively) of slop in the rocker.

    Difference on hydraulic lifters between the half turn or 1 full turn really doesn't matter, they just need to be close. So whether pumped up or not, you end up with the same result.
     
  3. 99firehawk

    99firehawk 1/2 ton status

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    If your valve covers are off this is easy.
    pull the #1 plug
    put your finger over the hole crank the engine over with a wrench. Watch your valves after the intake valve closes put you finger over the hole and you will feel a puff of air. Now stab in your dizzy where ever you want. All that matters is rotor is pointed just ahead of the #1 terminal on the cap. then make sure you have the right order 18436572. Adjust you valves as close as you can too loose is better then to tight, but the easyiest way to do it IMHO is start the motor let it warm up shut it down put a old towel on you inner fender (or cut a 2x14 hole in an old valve cover) or you can spend 12-14$ on tools to preven the spraying of oil as well) start the motor and adjust the valves with it running. back up a nut till the rocker clatters then tighten it slowy till it stops then 1/2 turn.
    Its a lil messy but easy as hell. (i wouldnt recomend this way if you have realyy high compression or a really high lift cam)
     
  4. 1-ton

    1-ton 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    I have built engines where I have pre oiled lifters before putting them into the lifter bores, and others where I did not; and I have learned that I do not like to pre oil lifters before I put them into thier bores. Pre oiling the lifters makes it very difficult to get a good feel for the proper valve adjustment. I like to put them in dry (of course the camshaft has pre-assembly lube on it), and then adjust the valves. Then before I start the engine I use a pre-oiling shaft tool, which will oil the entire engine.
     
  5. dmanblazer

    dmanblazer 1/2 ton status

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    Well just as I thought I'd have to do in my original post, I didn't have to pull everything off my engine.

    As far as the valves go, I got to thinking about what you guys said and it doesn't matter if they are oiled or not, the lash is still the same, as long as they are adjusted before they bleed out and the pushrod doesn't move again.
     

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