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Watchin NHRA

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by surpip, Apr 19, 2005.

  1. surpip

    surpip 1 ton status

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    Man it's amazing to me how much power these cars put to the ground :yikes:
    1 question if anyone knows, When they do the burnout's the butterflies stay closed on the blower, why is this?

    Also its crazy watchin them drop cylinders, how much raw gas comes out the pipes,

    Speaking of the pipes, I went to a Nostalgia drags at Sacto race way, i was on the track, just watchin, I had pit passes cause my uncle was racing,
    Anyway, one of the slingshot dragsters was up, and the crew was pushing it back, the guy triped on his shoes(the track getts real sticky when it is prepared) and fell, his arm landed across the red hot headers.
    Man he screamed so loud, they rushed him to the hospital, pretty crazy stuff.
     
  2. jarheadk5

    jarheadk5 1/2 ton status

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    2 summers ago, I was watching a webcast of an NHRA event; Larry Dixon's crew showed some power figures from the onboard computer. They had a torquemeter installed in the driveshaft, and the average number on a good run was about 7000hp. One run they made was a 4.60-something, and the computer showed relatively little tirespin. When the clutch locked up, the motor put down 9000+ hp for a couple tenths of a second!

    There is a stop block on the throttle bracket for the burnout. If you watch the crewchiefs, after they back the car up they'll pull a couple things off the motor and show them to the driver. One's the throttle stop. (The other is usually the "safety" for the secondary [high-pressure] fuel pump.)
    It's purpose is to preserve the motor. T/F drivers used to modulate the throttle by ear during the burnout, but that's just not realistic anymore. Too hard to listen to that insanity and keep the revs reasonable, keep the car straight, not spin the tires longer than needed, etc. Plus the motors were really temperamental when they were allowed to run straight nitro (not anymore...) - too many grenaded motors right in front of the fans, too many races lost before the green ever showed. So now they just push until the pedal stops, and the motor spins at a "safe" RPM for the burnout, and he/she won't accidentally trigger the secondary fuel system or the clutch timer.

    Approx. 14 gallons of mitromethane/methanol mix are carried onboard. Roughly 10 gallons is used during the burnout and staging, most of it dumping straight out of the pipes. The other 4 gallons of fuel are consumed in less than 5 seconds, so each cylinder has about a half-gallon of fuel go through it (burned or not) in that 5 seconds.
    Last I heard, nitro was running about $85 a gallon......
     
  3. surpip

    surpip 1 ton status

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    man drag racing is soooooo cool, i love it it really gets my blood pumping :D :D
     

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