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welder questions.

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by riz, Mar 5, 2001.

  1. riz

    riz 3/4 ton status

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    <font color=purple> I've been looking at welders this weekend and was wondering what amp rating I need ........ 80,90,100 ? Also, what brand would you guys suggest ? I don't want to mess with tanks at all, just a self contained unit. Any help would be appreciated.



    L8r,
    . Riz . <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.geocities.com/rizmonkey>http://www.geocities.com/rizmonkey</A>

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  2. Woodman89

    Woodman89 Registered Member

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    I would suggest a MIG because of the versatility. You would need to get flux core wire though. Stick with the well known brands - Lincoln, Miller, Etc. It really depends on how much you want to spend. Ive got a Century and run it at 90 amp most of the time and it works great. I have tanks, so I have not tried the flux core wire with it.
     
  3. Grim-Reaper

    Grim-Reaper 3/4 ton status Author

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    Well if your looking for something to do thicker metals then the cheap way to go is a stick welder. You can pick up a good stick like a Lincoln Arc 225 for $200 at most home stores.
    If your wanting to do sheet metal then you need mig. Don't mess around with Mig welders that are 110v, they are about worthless on anything over body sheet metal thickness. It just doesn't have the oomph. It makes a good second to the stick but if yout able, buy a good 220 Mig with as high as possible duty cycle.
    Lots of welders say they can weld 1/4 plate (like that 110v mig) but the Duty cycle is so bad that you can weld 2 minutes and have to wait 8 for the machine to cool. You really get what you pay for in a Mig.

    Diging it in the dirt with my K5's
    Grim-Reaper
    <A target="_blank" HREF=http://grimsk5s.coloradok5.com/>http://grimsk5s.coloradok5.com/</A>
     
  4. riz

    riz 3/4 ton status

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    <font color=purple> If I were to get the Lincoln Arc 225 would it be able to weld a shock bracket to the frame and also be able to weld in a peice of floorboard ? I want to learn how to weld since I want to do things for myself and save some money. My Grandpa was going to teach me but died before we could do it. I want to have some versatility, but don't want to buy something that won't do what I want it to or be way to much for what I need.

    L8r,
    . Riz . <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.geocities.com/rizmonkey>http://www.geocities.com/rizmonkey</A>

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  5. Boss

    Boss 1/2 ton status Author

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    I too would suggest a MIG. If I were you though, I would get the Gas (CO2 & Argon mix) anyway. Makes the welds look so much better. I first started with just the Flux Core, and practiced with that a while. It was ok, but then when I bought the Gas (40 cube size), the gas makes is look so much better and actually makes it easier I think. Anyways, I agree you get what you pay for in a MIG. I payed $500 for mine and I don't remember, but I think it is like 120 to 135amp, something like that. It's a Craftsman brand, but I hear that Craftsman takes either Miller or Lincoln MIGs and put their name on it. I welded shock mounts onto my axle (pics below) and was on level 6 of 8 on the voltage. My power in my garage always cuts out before the duty cycle does (when I'm on a higher voltage level) and that PISSES me off. Nothing like getting into it in the middle of the weld and then the power cuts off. [​IMG] I don't remember what the duty cycle of it is though.

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    Boss

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  6. Butch

    Butch 1/2 ton status

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    Welding anything of sheetmetal thickness will be difficult at best with a stick welder. It would work great on that shock bracket though. I have a Hobart 250 Beta mig that is great, but pricey $1700. I can weld anything I want with it and it has 60% on the duty cycle, so I get tired before it does. Although when I try to do sheetmetal with it I struggle to get the heat range low enough not to blow holes. I also have a hobart 135 that is 110 volt. It comes in good handy for the sheet metal and when necessary I can get up to that 1/4 thick that it claims. The trick to these little 110volt jobs like you are talking about is preheating anything thicker than 1/8" with a rosebud first and then they will get good penetration. If you will be welding inside a building then go with the gas, it is much cleaner and does not smell so bad, but if you will be welding in the open air then you better go with innershield. .

    I thought I was wrong once,
    but I was mistaken
     
  7. Pugsley

    Pugsley 1/2 ton status

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    A MIG is best for sheetmetal by itself, but you can do a good job with a stick welder if you pick up a stitch welder attachment (about a hundred bucks from Eastwood). I've never been too impressed with the MIG's ability to do heavy steel, and I can't lay a clean bead with one to save my life. For the cost of a quality 220V MIG, you could probably score a good stick machine with several accessory attachments.
     
  8. BIGJ

    BIGJ 1/2 ton status Author

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    I say go with the stick welder too. It can't be beat for the price or the different sizes of metal you can weld. I made a skidplate for the blazer and some other stuff for the shop, all with a stick welder (lincoln 220). The learning curve is a little steeper than a mig, but all it takes is some practice to start laying a good bead. Just my .02

    BIGJ
     
  9. DieselDan

    DieselDan 1/2 ton status

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    Just my .02, I'ld suggest taking a welding class first (I did). Once you've got the basics of stick (heliarc), MIG comes pretty easy. I guess you can see, unless you got lots o'money you need to plan on what you're going to weld. Maybe you hook-up with someone in welding class that has a MIG and you can invest in an Arc (or vise-versa).
     
  10. Bubba Ray Boudreaux

    Bubba Ray Boudreaux 1 ton status

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    I have to disagree with you Reaper. I just bought a Lincoln SP-125 a few months ago and it kicks a**! Just welded some plates on top of my spring plates and it didn't flinch. Granted, I'll very rarely do anything over a quarter of an inch, but it can handle it.
     
  11. Grim-Reaper

    Grim-Reaper 3/4 ton status Author

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    Well I think thats the same model I used (bud loaned it to me) and while it did do a good job welding in my floors and welding the skin on my gate I really feel it is under powered for use on anything in excess of 1/8 inch thick. It just doesn't have the penetration needed to be making stuff like heavy bumpers etc. Let me put it this way...I wouldn't be any where near a winch bumper made with one.
    I can lay a bead that has 2-3 times the penetration in 1/4 plate with a arc in one pass than I could in 2 passes with the 110v MIG. The Arc would far exceed the strength. It may not be as pretty but it would be stonger. That's with a $200 Arc verses ANY 110v mig.
    Also a Arc is cheaper to run. Welding rod runs just under $1 a pound. I lay easily 3 times the weld with the Arc than it cost me to run the mig having to refill bottles every 2 hours. I went through 6 bottles of gas at $17 a refill and about 5 lb of wire. that welded in 2 rockers, 2 floors and 2 skins.
    I stand by my post...the 110 is good for light sheet but if your wanting to make bumpers, Skids, and bashing gear don't waste the money on the 110v migs. Either get a serious Mig or get the 110 for light stuff and the $200 Arc for the meat. For the record I'm still thinking of doing just that. I may well end up getting the same mig you have to compliment the Arc. Course there is a serious duty 240v TIG for sale in the paper for $300 :) They take practice but they can weld anything if you practice. Talk about a pretty bead!

    Diging it in the dirt with my K5's
    Grim-Reaper
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  12. Grim-Reaper

    Grim-Reaper 3/4 ton status Author

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    Boss I know that sitting in the dark feeling hahaha. I have a older house and the only power in my garage is the outlet for the opener in the ceiling. Little did I know that circuit also has a wall of my Kitchen on it. I'm welding away and power the power goes out and I'm in the dark. find my way to the door go inside to kick the breaker. This happens like 3 times. 3rd time My wife says somethings wrong with the microwave....see where this is going..
    She flips on the Microwave walks out of the room. I hit the welder and pop goes the breaker ahahahaha. I flip on the breaker she comes back and finds the food still cold hahaha.

    Diging it in the dirt with my K5's
    Grim-Reaper
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  13. Bubba Ray Boudreaux

    Bubba Ray Boudreaux 1 ton status

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    So far, I've only done the spring plates on my truck. The spring plates are 3/16", the plates I attached are the same thickness. Looked in the book, dialed the machine in and I was welding. Heat penetration was there. Second plate, I turned the power down because the first plate I was having to move too fast to prevent burn through. I don't plan on doing anything more than a 1/4" with it and it's rated up to 5/16" so I don't forsee any problems.

    "Liberals ain't mean, they just don't have any common sense!"
     

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