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Welding Electrodes

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Glock Girl, Mar 6, 2002.

  1. Glock Girl

    Glock Girl Registered Member

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    I am looking for a online list of all the available stick welding electrodes (by number) and possibly a brief explanation of what they are best used for....and if anyone has simmilar info on mig wire that would be nice too TIA
     
  2. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    I'm going from memory here so there may be a few small mistakes.

    Decoding an electrode...

    Let's use 7018 as an example.
    70 refers to the tensile strength, in this case 70,000 psi tensile. Most common rods are 60XX or 70XX. The special purpose rods go much higher than that though.
    1 tells us this is an all position rod. You can weld uphand, overhead, or flat etc. Most common rods are either '1' or '2' in this position. 2 refers to 'flat position only.
    8 This tells us the compostion of the flux on the rod. 8 is a low hydrogen rod.

    Some common rods are 6010 (6011) which use a celluloid fibre flux. This rod digs real hard and the puddle freezes very quickly. There is no iron powder added. This is a rod commonly used for pipe welding for the 'root pass'. It tends to be ugly.../forums/images/icons/smile.gif
    6012 (6013) these are common 'farmer' rods, easy to use, give a good weld appearance but don't penetrate exceedingly well.
    7014...another farmer rod, this one has iron powder added to the flux and is easy to use and gives a good appearance.
    7018...This is a great rod but not particularly suited to dirty steel. It can be a difficult rod to use though.
    7024...similar to the 7014 it really only differs because of the amount of iron powder added. It's referred to as a Jet rod...flat position only.

    MIG wire is usually E70S

    E...is for electrode
    70...is for 70,000 psi tensile
    S...is for solid

    there are way too many flux core 'codes' to remember.

    Hope that helps some

    Rene
     
  3. White Knight

    White Knight 1/2 ton status

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    Damn Rene is there anything you DON'T know!!!!!!!

    White Knight (Texas variety)/forums/images/icons/smile.gif
     
  4. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    I don't know how to save money.../forums/images/icons/smile.gif

    I guess all that crap I learned in welding school 'stuck' in my brain a little. There is quite a bit more to it than what I posted, but it makes pretty dry reading./forums/images/icons/tongue.gif

    Rene
     
  5. Glock Girl

    Glock Girl Registered Member

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    Thanks Rene
    I already knew most of that though.lol I was looking more for going the other way around if you have a specific applicaton and need the number not decoding what you already have I already use(d) most of the rods you mentioned but I know there are a lot more out there that I dont know about
     

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