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Welding Question!

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by K5thatShmobs, Oct 9, 2002.

  1. K5thatShmobs

    K5thatShmobs 1/2 ton status

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    Im new to welding and I just bought a Craftsman 120V, 90amp wire-feed MIG welder. My first day I experimented with some pieces of scrap steel that I picked up @ the local steel mill. The pieces were clean, and I even grinded the surface area where I was welding and where the ground was clamped. But, no matter what, I could not get any saturation! Every bead I laid down was always losely attached to the surface, and never bonded or melted to anything. I tried different line speeds and different voltages, but still, no bonding whatsoever. Is this welder too weak? What am I doing wrong here, dammit? Heres a link to the welder and its specs... I would appreciate any help! Thanks.
    Welder Specs
     
  2. txbluethunder

    txbluethunder 1/2 ton status

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    what thickness where you trying to weld and what time of wire in the feed. unless its pretty thin stuff you'll have to take it really slow.
     
  3. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    Make sure you are going slow enough...travel speed is 50% of what makes the weld good or not. Make sure your 'stick-out' is within reason. 'Stick-out' is the distance from the end of the contact tip to the weld puddle itself. 3/8"-1/2" is about ideal.

    It sounds like you're moving too quickly though.

    Rene
     
  4. Scuba Steve

    Scuba Steve Registered Member

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    Make sure you are using flux-core wire because you dont have a shielding gas hook-up on that welder. Also keep your angle good and slow down. On the welder their should be a sticker that tells you the setting the welder needs to be on for different metals. /forums/images/graemlins/angryfire.gif
     
  5. meatloafK5

    meatloafK5 Registered Member

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    I know the feeling! I learned to weld on my Blazer this past year just to have it pass state inspection. It wasn't pretty but it is still solid. With the thicker metals, go slow as suggested. With the thinner metals like, 16-18g you have to watch your heat because you will melt a lot and poke holes in the material you are welding. Which will be a pain in the butt to patch depending what you are welding. Take your time and learn. Basically every time I weld I learn something new. Good luck!

    /forums/images/graemlins/k5.gif /forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif
     
  6. Scuba Steve

    Scuba Steve Registered Member

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    You could also take a mig class at a local community college if you have the time. Most have night classes. Thats what I am doing now, and I have learned alot. Some might also let you bring your truck in and the teacher will help you. You will learn alot more than you can read out of a book, and most of the time the class is like $70. /forums/images/graemlins/angryfire.gif
     

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