Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

Welding Spring Plates

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by midnitewarya, Jan 29, 2006.

  1. midnitewarya

    midnitewarya Sounds like a problem for future me. Premium Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2002
    Posts:
    1,726
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    SoCal
    I'm about to purchase a welder. I have welded before, and know the basics. The main reason I'm buying the welder is to weld my spring plates and my shock mounts to my 14bff. In the future, I'd like to tube up a bumper. I have been seriuosly thinking about getting a Lincoln135. Is this enough welder to handle what I want to do? My spring plates are 3/8", so I'm pretty sure I'll get good penetration on them.

    Thanks in advance,
    Al
     
  2. midnitewarya

    midnitewarya Sounds like a problem for future me. Premium Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2002
    Posts:
    1,726
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    SoCal
  3. K5er4Life

    K5er4Life 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2002
    Posts:
    1,456
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Bellflower, Ca
    I would not trust the 135 to do that kind of welding. Its a 110v machine and doesnt have enough amperage to penetrate very heavy steel. I think the machine says it can do up to 5/16" but after using my friends 135 for a while I only use it for nothing more than 3/16" mild steel. With 3/8" I would not use that machine, you would not get the needed heat to penetrate nicely.
     
  4. mouse

    mouse 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2003
    Posts:
    1,448
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Great Falls Mt
    I just got a Lincoln 175 from Santa. It has shown me, so far, to be pretty strong. I've welded 3/8 inch no problem, set it to a higher heat and it was almost acting like a plasma cutter just blowing the metal out.

    Invest in a good welder the first time, and you won't have to spend more money down the road.
     
  5. trailblazr81

    trailblazr81 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    May 27, 2005
    Posts:
    931
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Hollister, CA
    I would prefer the 175, but if you must do 110 volt or dont have the $$$ I think you should be ok with the 135 at its highest level. It says up to 5/16" with single pass. Tho I havent gone over 1/4" with mine. But if you ever want to do anything bigger you'll regret not getting the 175.
     
  6. Jonny-K5

    Jonny-K5 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    May 27, 2003
    Posts:
    1,654
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    SoCal
    the 135 is rated for up tp 5/16" using flux core, with gas its only good to 1/4". the 175 models have the same thickness ratings as the 135, just longer duty cycles( if i remember correctly). if your going to buy a 220v welder you might as well get something like a miller 210. a few hundred more than the lincoln 175, and i think its at least rated @ 3/8ths thick using MIG. the 210 (or similar sized machine) is perfect for doing bumpers, repairs etc.
     
  7. midnitewarya

    midnitewarya Sounds like a problem for future me. Premium Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2002
    Posts:
    1,726
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    SoCal
    Thanks for the help guys, I've picked the lincoln 175. I can a good deal on it through work.:wink1:
     
  8. wetbackZO

    wetbackZO 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Posts:
    113
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Las Cruces, NM
    I got a MillerMatic 210 and it welds 3/8 in one pass...yeah baby!
     
  9. goldwing2000

    goldwing2000 Guest

    I bought a used 110v MIG for thin stuff (up to 1/4") and a new 220v stick welder for everything else (up to 1" thick if you do it right).

    Total invested: $400
     

Share This Page