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welding to cast?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by 55Willy, Apr 2, 2007.

  1. 55Willy

    55Willy 3/4 ton status

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    is brazing the only way to get a good bond? I'm building my front coil mounts and I want to make sure the passenger side can be as beefy as the driver side. the diff blocks one full side of support but I'm gonna add a rock ring to it to tie into, was just looking for a piece of mind and thinking I could braze the other end to the cast housing.
     
  2. SCOOBYDANNN

    SCOOBYDANNN 1/2 ton status

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    correct me if i am wrong as I have only seen it done once.

    heat up the piece red hot and use a high nickle rod (stick weld) let it cool naturaly.
     
  3. ntsqd

    ntsqd 1/2 ton status

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    Most diff castings weld fairly nicely w/ just a MIG. That doesn't mean you get the penetration or strength, just that they weld nicely.

    Design your mount to have a lot of weld seam length. Avoid getting the casting hot in only one area, the differential cooling can easily pull the fresh bead out of the cast metal. Though a little preheat is a good idea. If you can lay your hand on it, but don't want to leave it there very long then that's about right. Weld a bit, let it cool. Repeat. If it is cast iron you'll want to peen the weld bead as it cools. A chipping hammer seems to work very well for this.

    If you are absolutly certain that you're dealing with cast iron then Ni-rod, Rockmount 'Jupiter', or brazing are probably your best bet. I remain unconvinved that Dana hsgs, in particular, are cast iron. I believe them to be cast steel or more likely cast semi-steel. That the steel tubes are welded into it tells me that it's a production-wise weldable alloy of some sort, and cast iron wouldn't normally fall in that catagory. The difference is a rather small difference in total carbon content, but it makes a large difference in how it wants to be welded. Cast steels weld like any other steel.
     
  4. Elevator Man

    Elevator Man 1/2 ton status

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    Burry it in the sand to let i cool very slowly!!!!
     
  5. ragleone

    ragleone Registered Member

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    You have to slowly heat it up and slowly cool it down it take to people to do it right. and where the crack is you need to drill a hole at all ends of the crack this well keep it from crack more . v it out with something "grinder" use nickell rod hope for the best. when your are weilding someone need to be heat it in front of you
     
  6. Pookster

    Pookster 1/2 ton status

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    no expert but there are a few tips and tricks out there for welding cast iron...

    Most involve a lot of pre-heating and post cooling. If you can have a propane torch heating the surrounding area until red hot, then start welding. Keep the heat on until after you finished. They do sell some kinda thermal wrap to allow for even slow cooling. YOu could just also turn down the propane torch, and slowly move it further and further away...

    Stick welding might provide the best (cheap) option. Tig with nickle rod is better. And there are some funky new age options like nickle spray...
     
  7. cybrfire

    cybrfire 1 ton status Vendor GMOTM Winner

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    You can easily get it too hot! If you do it does nothing but pop in front of and around the weld.
     
  8. Tominator II

    Tominator II 1/2 ton status

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    I have welded balance weights on a 454 flywheel, and clutch linkage pivot points on a cast bellhousing with nickel arc welding rod and not had problems after years of use.
     

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