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Welding Trouble!

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by K5thatShmobs, Oct 9, 2002.

  1. K5thatShmobs

    K5thatShmobs 1/2 ton status

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    Im new to welding and I just bought a Craftsman 120V, 90amp wire-feed MIG welder. My first day I experimented with some pieces of scrap steel that I picked up @ the local steel mill. The pieces were clean, and I even grinded the surface area where I was welding and where the ground was clamped. But, no matter what, I could not get any saturation! Every bead I laid down was always losely attached to the surface, and never bonded or melted to anything. I tried different line speeds and different voltages, but still, no bonding whatsoever. Is this welder too weak? What am I doing wrong here, dammit? Heres a link to the welder and its specs... I would appreciate any help! Thanks.
    Link to welder
     
  2. gmule

    gmule 1/2 ton status

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    I'm not the best welder around probably not even considered a welder more of a buthcher. I have that welder What wire are you using?

    You should be using ER70s-6 0.30 wire with a 75/20 argon o2 mix

    If you are using the flux wire you need to reconfigure the the polarity of the transformer. If you look under the cover that houses the wire there are directions for changing the polarity. depending on what wire you are using.
    I have welded up to 3/16ths steel with mine and as long as I go slow I can get a good burn with it.
     
  3. florida4x4

    florida4x4 1/2 ton status

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    Sorry to say but that welder is the problem. It just dont have enuf juice to do much more than sheet metal. Use .024 wire, turn up the heat and play with the fire feed till it looks good (although flux core will never look very goot). If you can return it and get something with at least 130A/20% duty cycle you will be happier.
     
  4. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    The machine is not the problem. There is no reason a 90 amp machine could not weld 3/16". Technique is more important than anything. The flux core wire is not the prettiest stuff out there but it does 'dig' harder than the gas shielded wire...

    If you want penetration go with the flux core, if you want pretty welds on thin material go with the gas sheilded micro-wire.

    Rene
     
  5. florida4x4

    florida4x4 1/2 ton status

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    Sorry it says sears on it. I'm a dik.
     
  6. Zeus33rd

    Zeus33rd Smarter than you GMOTM Winner

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    Like Rene said.....It's not the welder. Just gotta play with it long enuff to delope your technique. And you don't have to use the 75/25 gas. 75/25, also known as "Gold Gas"It will help to lay a prettier, flatter bead with slightly less penitration and a smoother arc.....Just straight C02 will cause the arc to be alittle "rougher" with a touch more penitration. The straight C02 is ALOT cheaper than the Gold Gas too. I run the 75/25 in my Lincoln....But I've got a pretty big machine. Alittle more forgiving. Lincoln Power MIG 200
     
  7. Grim-Reaper

    Grim-Reaper 3/4 ton status Author

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    Sears Badge engineers. Kennmore is Wirlpool and GE, Their A/C are Reem as are their water heaters (some are GE). Lawn tractors are Murry's.
    That Welder is made by somebody else. Looks like it might be a Miller or Hobart. It's close to a Hobart Handler 135 in designe and spec.
    I would make sure you have the polartiy correct for the wire your using and check the connections to the torch. 3/16 should get pretty good penetration on the highest two settings and about 75% wire speed.
    You may be going to fast. Try slowing down and making a weave or Z pattern as you go. That's the biggest mistake a beginner makes is moving too fast accross the work.
     
  8. florida4x4

    florida4x4 1/2 ton status

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    Right on. Take your time and watch the puddle form before you start moving the wire. The biggest part is learning when to move and how fast. Use a zig zag \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\ motion across the weld, pause momentarily at he end of each zig and zag. the arc should "sound" smooth and even while welding. if hte sound of the arc is erratic check that the wire is feeding at a constand rate then check that you are using a big enough extension cord if any (10ga should cover 100ft)welder looks like a century brand... /forums/images/graemlins/usaflag.gif
     
  9. Bubba Ray Boudreaux

    Bubba Ray Boudreaux 1 ton status

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    </font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
    Just gotta play with it long enuff to develope your technique.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    Perv!!!!!! /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif
     
  10. Ryan B.

    Ryan B. 3/4 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    </font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
    the arc should "sound" smooth and even while welding.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    Yup. My metals shop teacher used to tell me that when you hear it sounding like bacon frying... instead of popping and crackling like popcorn... just clean sounding bacon frying. you're laying a good bead. You can see it and feel it too.
     

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