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Welding with a oxyacetylene torch

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by MrArmyAnt, May 3, 2006.

  1. MrArmyAnt

    MrArmyAnt 1/2 ton status

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    Have a holw in the tailgate of a blazer. picked up some light (not really light but quite a bit) reading material on welding, and most say oxyacetylene torch should be the first purchase for all it can do. Any comments? I know an exhaust guy who said he'd teach me to weld this way, I may take him up on it. Anyway what torch is recomended? I'd rather go nicer than crappy. :). Also if anyone in the DFW area know gass suppliers let me know.
     
  2. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    For repairing sheet metal (and not being a welder) it looks to me like TIG is the way to go.

    I know it can be done with MIG, but anything that imparts a large amount of heat to the base metal is going to be *harder* to deal with than say a TIG, which to my understanding is very precise.

    Sheet metal warps very easily with heat, I would think an oxyacetylene torch would be a bad choice for sheet metal repair?

    http://classicbroncos.com/homemade-welder.shtml I like home built stuff. :)
     
  3. crazyhole812

    crazyhole812 1/2 ton status

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    i don't know much about torch welding but i know they've done it for a long time. mig is fine for sheetmetal as well. that's how i bobbed and shortened my bed. i use a miller 210. just have to go one tack weld at a time, that way the heat won't build up.
     
  4. PeteH

    PeteH 1/2 ton status

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    i love tig the most. but i dont think that is ideal. mig is good for all around and it is quick. oxy act is good but you'll burn holes and heat affect zone will be huge, but you can cut large things with it.

    the best thing to do is probably get both. that way you can do sheet metal(with mig) and larger things(oxy ac.)

    tig would be too expensive and not ideal for learning as a first welder. or you can learn with tig, so when you do mig for the first time you'll b a master.

    oh and i'm not saying that you cant weld sheet metal with oxy act. its just pretty darn difficult.

    also it depends how much you have to spend..like everyone will say, buy the best with the money you've got.
     
  5. MrArmyAnt

    MrArmyAnt 1/2 ton status

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    I just ordered a 12hp honda motor, going to use it for a compressor, generator, and alternator for air, power, and welding. Seems that people have had good results making tig welders that way. And I'll buy a torch to make the frame for all of it.
     
  6. PeteH

    PeteH 1/2 ton status

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    make a tig welder?
    or you talking bout making an arc/stick welder?
     
  7. bajaviking

    bajaviking 1/2 ton status

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    A MIG welder is by far the easiest to use for sheet metal work, especially if you don't have much experience welding.
     
  8. MrArmyAnt

    MrArmyAnt 1/2 ton status

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    It said tig on the site...
     
  9. PeteH

    PeteH 1/2 ton status

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    which site? if they show how to make one thad be cool.
     
  10. ntsqd

    ntsqd 1/2 ton status

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    Quote of this thread. You can do sheetmetal work with any welder if you have the required experience. A MIG is the least demanding for this application.
     
  11. Masiony

    Masiony 1/2 ton status

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    at the shop i used to work at, we used torch welding for things like cast iron. like say if a block was dropped and broke an ear off. we would "weld" a new one back on. basically we added all new material. but we used a mig for most of your "welding" needs.
     
  12. MrArmyAnt

    MrArmyAnt 1/2 ton status

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    Actually its the post right after mine. http://classicbroncos.com/homemade-welder.shtml I googled the topic and returned a lot of results using mustang alternators and such. A lot also ran compressors and generators off the gas or diesel motor (i bid on a gas, hopefully ill loose and will do diesel) on a 13 hp motor.
     
  13. tx_sub

    tx_sub 1/2 ton status

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    To answer your question of what brand oxy acet gear to pick up, Victor all the way. A torch is probably the most versatile tool. It cuts and glues. The other types of welders just glue. Monkeys can use mig guns. It takes skill and PRACTICE to handle gas and TIG welding.
     
  14. MrArmyAnt

    MrArmyAnt 1/2 ton status

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    Sounds good. I see you're in Denton. Any reomended supply stores/vendors?
     
  15. tx_sub

    tx_sub 1/2 ton status

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    There are a few up here, but I've not been to them. There are several in the Dallas area. I bought some stuff from one on Singleton East of Loop 12 when I worked down there. Dont' recall the name. You may find a better deal online. I've gotten good deals online from cyberweld.com
    Froogle.com is your friend. Good luck.
     
  16. MrArmyAnt

    MrArmyAnt 1/2 ton status

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    I love froogle. Only thing is where do I get the gasses filled?
     
  17. broc944

    broc944 1/2 ton status

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    Master the gas. Once mastered you will understand why I said this.
     
  18. MrArmyAnt

    MrArmyAnt 1/2 ton status

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    So gas it is. Still need a good compressor/lawn mower engine seup though. Let's hope gas won't damage the hole on the tailgate i have to fix too much.
     
  19. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    Gas welding the tailgate which is 22 guage at best is most likely going to result in either a bigger hole, or some much distortion from the ehat you'll kick yourself. A small MIG machine is best.

    TIG actually puts more heat into the material than MIG does.

    Rene
     
  20. RustBuket

    RustBuket 1/2 ton status

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    I think gas welding for bodywork would take alot of skill and practice. The process is slower and therefore more heat will transfer and warp the panels.
     

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