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Welding with straight CO2...

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by BigBurban350, Jun 5, 2003.

  1. BigBurban350

    BigBurban350 1/2 ton status

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    Would welding with straight CO2 weld good? I have paintball CO2 tanks already and im not about to dish out money for an argon tank. I got a couple 20oz and a 16oz. Can I just adapt to the argon regulator or would i have to regulate it down first? Whats the cylinder pressure of argon?
     
  2. willyswanter

    willyswanter 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    You will empty a 16oz tank in about 3 minutes...
     
  3. Shaggy

    Shaggy 3/4 ton status

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    <font color="green"> You're trying real hard to put those paintball tanks to use somewhere, aren't you? /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif </font>
     
  4. weldor

    weldor Registered Member

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    Welding with straight "welding grade" CO2 is good for solid wire mig welding and specified flux cored wires. CO2 will give you a little hotter weld for welding heavier metals. The 75% Argon/25% CO2 mixed gases are good for the thinner metals and body panels. Yeah, I know that peole weld heavy metals (thick sections) all of the time with great results. Fact is, 75/25 is probably the most popular gas mix on the market. But, if you want to go to spray transfer then neither straight CO2 nor the 75/25 will allow the arc to go to that mode. You would need a gas mix of a minimum of 80% argon or up to pure argon.

    The regulator is made specifically for CO2 and has a teflon type washer to keep the regulator from freezing. Although, an adaptor can be purchased to use your argon regulator on the CO2 cylinder.

    Argon cylinder pressure on one of the large tanks can be 2250 psig.

    Consider that when mig welding you should have somewhere around 20 to 30 cubic feet per hour (CFH) of gas flow for proper shielding. Personally, I don't think the 20 ounce cylinder would give you enough time to make a decent weld. /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif
     
  5. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    [ QUOTE ]
    The regulator is made specifically for CO2 and has a teflon type washer to keep the regulator from freezing.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Is that what that stupid washer is supposed to do? We usually have to hang a trouble light off the regulator to keep it from icing up...even with the teflon washer in place. Nothing like running several 30" long passes in quick succession to get the reg icing up...

    Personally I think 20 CFH is too low unless there is absolutely no breeze and the gun is perfectly clean. Grinding porosity sucks, I'd rather run the gas flow a bit higher and have a bit of a margin.

    Rene
     

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