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Welding

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by 87BrnRsd, Sep 28, 2003.

  1. 87BrnRsd

    87BrnRsd 1/2 ton status

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    I have a project going on my 87 K5. Im putting in a 14ff, echobit shackle flip, new front springs, a new driveshaft, and hopefully many more mods in the future. Anyways, knowing that I will be doing a lot of work on my truck, I bought a welder yesterday from a friend. It is a miller electric, thunderbolt 225v arc welder. I am new to the world of welding and want to know some basics. How long will it take for me to actually start producing welds that will hold? One of my first projects with the welder will be to create rock sliders. Later, after I get a tube bender, I plan on making a cage for my truck. Anyways, does anyone have any advice on using an arc welder that might help me. I cant start welding with it until I wire up a 220v outlet in my garage, but that should happen soon. Let me know what yall have learned from your experiences welding on what not and what to do. Thanks. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
    -Harrison
     
  2. Orange Crush

    Orange Crush 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    practice, practice, practice. just practice starting an arc and then running a bead.Heat is your friend.to low of a setting and the arc wont start and if it does you wont get penetration.stick with the flat position to start with.a 60 series rod is easy to learn to start an arc with. For example a 6010 is an all position rod. it will burn even if you dont have everything perfectly clean. Safety is first and foremost. Get a welding shield with at least a # 10 lens. gloves are a good idea also. I dont have a garage so I plug my welder into the clothes dryers outlet. DC is an easy current to learn with. The rod your using dictates the current and amperage settings. 3/32 is a size that is easier to work with until you get the hang of it. just my opinions though Im not an expert. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif /forums/images/graemlins/k5.gif
     
  3. pismorat

    pismorat 1/2 ton status

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    Congrats, the best way to start is to get a bunch of scrap metal and practice, just run beads on flat plate, then join plates, and then start working on tubes and things to get good at moving around. There also good books at libraries to learn more, but practice is the best teacher. After a few good hours of practice, you should be good. Make sure you get good penetration!
    /forums/images/graemlins/truck.gif
     
  4. rjfguitar

    rjfguitar 3/4 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    the key to getting the strongest welds is to get the spot where your arc is as hot as it will possibly get before it melts.That is when the metals bond together the best. I have been welding for a long time and was taught by my dad who is a professional welder and it took a lot of practice to get that down. Be carefull with tubing because you can blow a whole through it with too much power and then it takes a good steady experienced hand to fill it back in on thin stuff. I would start on some thick scrap metal and go nuts with it until you've got the idea. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  5. gravdigr

    gravdigr 1/2 ton status

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    Get a welding book either from the library like I did or buy one. They help a lot if you are teaching yourself. Practice several different joints. I have found with my arc welder I wind up doing a lot of overlaps and 90 degree joints. What you do is weld 2 pieces of metal together. Then put em in a vise and beat the hell outts em with a BFH. This more than anything will show you where any weak spots are so you can adjust your technique. After a while you will get a "feel" for the metal. You will know when there is too much heat before you blow through. Like any trade skill comes with practice, but knoweledge comes from others.
     
  6. bajaviking

    bajaviking 1/2 ton status

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    Also, make sure the ground has a good clean connection and keep it as close to the area you are welding as possible. Always clean up the area your going to weld on with a grinder, new steel sometimes has coating on it that will keep you from getting good penetration and of course rust and oil is BAD.
     
  7. 87BrnRsd

    87BrnRsd 1/2 ton status

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    Thanks for all of the advice guys! I am still working on getting that 220v outlet hooked up right now. I saw a pretty nice how to weld book at lowes and am probably going to go buy that. Other than that just practice practice practice. Thanks for giving me the good advice though. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
    -Harrison
     
  8. ntsqd

    ntsqd 1/2 ton status

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    Finch's "Performance Welding" is NOT a book for this. Go to your local JC and find the book in their bookstore for their arc welding class. It will be a more difficult read, but all of the info you'll need will be in it.

    Keep your Rod Dry. Damp rod flux will cause you all sorts of trouble.
     

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