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Wellsville Ohio Trail Report August 4th-6th 2006

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by 78Buford, Aug 8, 2006.

  1. 78Buford

    78Buford 1/2 ton status

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    "Roy’s Condensed Soup version of the Wellsville trail report."

    I awoke at 6:00 am on Friday 8-4-2006. Left for work earlier than usual because I was towing Buford. The work day came & went. I left the office around 4:00 pm and called Milliron who was approximately 40 minutes away. I filled up both vehicles at a nearby gas station, and reset the trip odometer in the ’93 F350. I parked at the grocery store that Milliron was meeting me at. With some time to kill, I ventured inside. Ice, beer, cigarettes, two cheap steaks, one pack of "pre-cooked chicken w/cheddar patties" went into the cart, checked out & left.

    Carrying groceries with one arm and a 30 lb. bag of ice with the other, I found that Milliron had parked his Jeep & pop-up camper beside my junk in the parking lot. Milliron commented that his rear end was hot. I touched it, and it was indeed too hot to touch. I also noted lube leaking out of the end of Milliron’s rear end. Get your minds out of the gutter folks...talking about the D35 under Mike’s blue-gray TJ.

    We BS’d a few minutes and hit the road. 2 miles on 77 south, 45 miles or so on 70 east, 40 miles on 7 north, a couple phone calls back & forth & one stop for gas approximately 15 miles from Wellsville, and we had arrived. It should be noted that at the gas station prior to Wellsville, Milliron touched his rear end again, and noted it was still "too hot to touch." Wondering how mine compared to his, I asked him to touch mine. He noted, "Yours is bigger, and it is also too hot to touch." We agreed that the 10.25" Sterling rear in the ‘93 F-350 towing approximately 10K and the 7.?" D35 in Mike’s Jeep towing approximately 2K were likely equal in their load vs. size vs. maximum tow ratings.

    We arrived at the Oaktree Sportsman Club around 6:45 or 7:00 pm. Jamie, Lambert, Ernie and his boys were already there. Jamie observed to have a slight buzz, while the others were sober. All of them had been there for a couple hours.

    I cracked a Natty Ice from the cooler after parking. Jamie’s tent was already setup. Lambert’s motor home was in place. Brent arrived a while later. I setup camp and had a few beers during said process. We asked Lambert if he wanted to venture into town with us, and he declined. Milliron has not consumed alcoholic beverages for nearly 20 years, and offered to drive into town. This was much appreciated by all three of us.

    Summary of trip into town(s):

    Dan’s Bar: Warmish beer due to power outage earlier in the day. I was advised by a woman in her mid-late 40's that I "had a nice arse" as I apparently brushed against her while "trying to make myself skinny" walking through the crowded bar sideways. Jamie met several locals, and we left the bar after the one round of Miller High Life that I bought for everyone. Jamie drank the extra one (that Milliron had no interest in).

    We headed to another bar in which I forget the name of: This place was loud & obnoxious. Multiple things occurred at this bar. If you weren’t there, you don’t really need to know what happened. All of us were laughing our arses off when we left...and we noted that it was dark outside after exiting the premises.

    Jamie’s cell phone was starting to smell burnt from all of the calls he was making to various club members throughout the night. BShaw was called approximately 5 times during a 2 hour period, Brad was hit up, someone found Sauer’s number somewhere, etc. During the course of the evening, I laughed harder/louder/longer on Friday night at various times than I had in quite a while.

    After we left the unknown bar, we went to the Cove for quite a while in East Liverpool. Ate some bar grub, drank more brew, Brent and I assisted Jamie in exiting the bar, we piled into Million’s TJ: I had shotty, Brent behind Mike, Jamie behind me.

    We arrived back at camp. Stroud arrived a while later sans Larry, trailer, and both Suzuki’s. Long story short: Stroud had a trailer tire blow out near Zanesville, corrected that, and then had another blowout late Friday night. He can give details of that aspect of the report. Ernie and Steve measured Ernie’s King-Kong trailer and figured that both Suzuki’s would fit on it. Ernie and Steve left the campground around 11:30-midnight.

    I cooked a cheap round steak on the fire & ate most of it with my hands, leaving a chunk of it on the picnic table for rodents to feed off of during the night.

    Jamie had found his way into a tent...my tent. Brent grabbed his ankles, I grabbed his wrists, and we removed him from my tent and placed him into his own tent. Stroud, Larry, Ernie and Suzuki’s arrived around 2:30 am-3:00 am. Around 3:30-4:00 am, I awoke hungry, left my tent, observed Larry lying on the ground near his tent, stepped over him, and opened a bag of Chili Fritos, and a bag of Cheetos. Early the next morning, Brent commented that he "thought a Bear might have been eating stuff around 3:30." Brent was not surprised when he found that it was me...as I had reached into the passenger side door of the towing Ford, and opened both bags of snacks, and apparently chomped on them rather loudly for five minutes or so, before retreating to my flat air mattress.

    The Trail Ride itself:

    The group initially consisted of seven vehicles. Vehicles had dual lockers unless noted:

    Author in the Ford w/ Jamie shotgun on 42’s
    Brent in the YJ on 35’s
    Ernie and his sons in the S10 Blazer, 9” & D44 on 33’s
    Stroud in the Samurai on 35’s
    Larry in the Samurai on 36’s
    Tim in the TJ on 33’s & a rear locker
    Milliron in the TJ on 34’s.

    Lambert led us to the Ugly Trail & went off on his own after that. I went first, and crawled up the trail, getting halted once as all four 42’s started to spin. I reversed a few inches and tapped the throttle and made it to the first nasty section …where I had to get fairly high on the left embankment to get around a large rock on the last trip. I tried staying further right, placing both tires on the two large rocks, but I slid to the left a few times, hitting the front diff hard. I tried the far left without getting on the embankment a couple times. Stroud had arrived to spot, and I decided to try the “left tire on the left rock and the right tire on the right rock” approach again. With some grunt from the 469, the front end was on the rocks. When the front drove over the rocks, I applied more throttle, and Buford flopped and grunted over the mess. Jamie or someone outside of the vehicle noted that the passenger rear tire & wheel was grating violently against the side of the rock as the rear passed through this area. There are other steep ledges further up the trail, and the ride was rather rough in a couple places, but we made it without stopping, parked & walked back down to the “two big rock area” to watch the next rig.

    We discovered that Brent had started up the trail, but lost brakes when a front line became damaged. I’m pretty sure that Brent has already explained what happened regarding the brake line issue. He backed down and parked at the bottom. Milliron went next and made excellent progress up to the “two big rock” section. After some spotting and Mike gently changing his line, he was able to get through the section by using light throttle, and keeping all four tires turning slowly as he sawed the wheel back & forth a few times. This observed to be an excellent method, and several of us commented on how well the LTB’s did on the rocks. Milliron parked his hot rear end behind Buford’s smooth rear end at the top of the hill.

    Ernie’s son went next, and made it to the two rock area. After about a half hour, and many tries, with Ernie and his son alternating driving, the Blazer was unable to get past this section & backed down to the bottom. Tim stayed at the bottom, and without a front locker this was probably the best decision. During this time, Lambert stopped at the top of the hill & followed Brent back to camp in the Jeep. Brent left the Jeep at camp & returned with Lambert. Lambert took off & we did not see him until the very end of the day.

    Larry Frew in the Suzuki on 36’s went next, and I’m not sure exactly what happened, but it looked like he got slightly sideways prior to getting to the two rock area. I believe someone had a strap on his roll cage to steady it, but I couldn’t be certain about this. After Larry’s violent roll a month ago, it may be safe to say that he wasn’t interested in repeating that performance/trashing the roof again.

    Stroud went next in the V8 Suzuki, and made quick work of the hill. He may have been stopped a couple times, but after a slightly different line, he was parked behind Milliron’s TJ.

    The three of us drove up to the right at the end of the trail, made another right, and started to descend the slightly winding hill to meet up with the others at the bottom. This process was halted due to a guy on a quad and another guy on a dirtbike. Dirtbike dude would start his bike, try to drive forward, and then basically fall off of it. After wondering “WTF is he doing” aloud several times. After the guy fell down with the bike on top of him, I stopped on the hill & had Jamie keep foot near the brake as I got out. Milliron and I helped Dirtbike dude get off the side of the trail. I didn’t smell booze but the dude acted very odd. Maybe he was drunk…didn’t know & didn’t really care, just wanted him out of our way. After the two guys were out of our way, we went down the hill, turned right, and met up with the others. Some people ate lunch. Not exactly sure of where we were going, I led our group of six down the creek bed for quite a ways.

    I found “Buford’s Daddy” AKA “The trail Jerry got up and I couldn’t” off to the left. We stopped and looked at it. It looks a little worse than it used to, as the right side is seriously undercut.

    Ernie and his son played on the hill a few times, and was able to make it up the first steep section, and to the nasty part. They did not come close to making it over the obstacle. I went next and tried several times from light throttle to foot to the floor after the first section. Violent bouncing ensued. The front end would hit the nasty section, go airborne, slide right, and then flop around as I landed. I had at least three brutal attempts at the hill, with several mild tries thrown in as well. According to onlookers, I bashed the tie rod on the ledge very hard. I inspected it later, and it was still perfectly straight…duct tape, angle iron, and muffler clamps kick arse. In summary of my attempts: I did not come close to making over the obstacle. Stroud went next and tried many times as well, hitting the obstacle very hard on many occasions, and producing impressive wheel speed on the slippery rocks. One attempt looked significantly better than the others, but the front end never went over the ledge. Steve mentioned the carb burping a couple times. Ernie and his son tried the obstacle again, and due to the fact that the rocks were covered in slime, could not even get to the nasty section…and this is with dual lockers and new TSL’s. In short, unless this trail changes for the easier (don’t see that happening) I would be surprised if anyone in our club can get up this obstacle. On a lighter not, I did not bash the arse of Buford on the tree at the bottom…as I have every other time I’ve been here.

    We all headed further down the trail to the Chinese Waterfall. I stopped & waited for the picture takers to make it to the top. I went up the trail with minimal hassle. I parked. Milliron made it up the trail easily as well with Brent riding shotgun. They parked. I’m pretty sure the S10 Blazer went next, and didn’t have any real trouble either. This place is referred to as “axle alley.” There are literally broken axles all over the place. Several are stuffed into the ground as trophy’s (or tombstones) and most were D35 rear axles. Tim started up the trail and was wailing on the Jeep pretty hard. Brent was sitting beside me on the hill, and I noted, “I wouldn’t be surprised if there is another broken axle added to the pile.” When Tim got to the nasty part (steep short climb that skies the front end on short rigs), he appeared to have right foot on the floor and was bouncing around. “Snap.” A few minutes later, it was determined that the driver rear axle had broken on the locked D35. Tim was near the embankment (in the ravine) on the passenger side. He could not move forwards or backwards. Stroud pulled ahead to pull him sideways, away from the embankment, so he could back down the trail. Tim’s tail light on the passenger side looked like it was going to get ruined. Steve pulled him away, and it appeared that the tail light was saved. I’m not exactly sure what happened, but something lurched or jerked, and it ended up crushing not only the tail light, but also the passenger rear corner of Tim’s Jeep. Tim had spare axles, and used one for the repair. After Tim backed down the trail to the beginning, Jamie was called upon to disassemble the rear end. Jamie did most of the work, Stroud disassembled the lockright, the broken axle was removed, Stroud reassembled the locker, and Jamie put everything back together. These past few sentences only took a few seconds to type, but it should be noted that the rear axle repair took approximately 2.5 hours to complete.

    While we were working on the rear axle of Tim’s TJ, the two guys we met at “Buford’s Daddy” had hung out with us while the repair took place. The Sami on 35’s (I think) could not get up the Chinese Waterfall, and the XJ with no doors and 36’s, welded rear, open front did make it up the trail.

    After the Jeep was mobile again, we followed the two guys further up the trail and ran the rock garden trail backwards. I say backwards only because every time I have been to this place in Wellsville, it was always from the other direction. This trail is really watered down compared to how it was a year ago. Beavers and random logs have filled in some of the gap between large rocks, making it easier. No one had any major trouble in this area.

    We went further ahead to unknown territory for me. We started a fairly long climb on the right side of the creek that led to the playground/Little Waterfall area. The climbs was rather steep in places, but the only real issue with this trail was one spot which gave the driver the option of dropping the passenger side into a ravine and riding it out, or straddling the area. I dropped the passenger side in & rode it out. Several people were within inches of busting their windshields in this area, but fortunately no one did.

    After we reached a clearing, we found the elusive little waterfall that I had wanted to run for over a year, but we had never made it back that far to running out of time, or rigs breaking on the past several trips to Wellsville. This is the spot that in Easter 2004, no Jeeps were able to make it up, and both Brad and I did. This is where Lambert broke two front axles, the locker, the carrier, and a rear axle all in one shot over Easter 2004. At that time, the nasty line was straight up the middle…actually that was the only line at the time. When we found this trail last July on the night run, the difficult line was on the far left….going straight lessened the steepness effect. In July of 2005, Jamie got the front of his Jeep up the obstacle, but it was too steep for a short vehicle to climb. It looked similar to how it did in July of 2005, yet somehow smaller from how I last remember it.

    Anyway, back to the present: Going “straight up it” didn’t look too difficult, and the XJ did go up the middle. The difficult line was to the left, as it was about 3.5’ to 4’ tall. Stroud tried it first, and when the nose started climbing, he got on the throttle & powered up the difficult line. Milliron went next, and was able to get the nose up the obstacle, but when he tried to proceed, he was dragging the belly of the Jeep. He wiggled around & tried a few different lines before backing down. I had been watching the action and walked over to the Ford to go up it. I was fairly certain that I would not have too much trouble with it due to the length of the truck. Stroud was standing on the obstacle. I asked if the front was going to clear (getting the tires to the rock) and he said it looked good. The front end climbed easily up the rock, and I stopped. I advised Steve, “I’m going to try crawling it” and started inching forwards. Thinking that Stroud had made it on his first attempt, I changed my mind as Buford was inching forwards and said aloud, “**** it” and got on the throttle. Buford flopped up and over the obstacle without too much resistance.

    We were about done for the day as it was around 6:00 pm or so. While discussing what to do next, the white Cherokee with a welded rear and open front began playing on the difficult line, and after many attempts, he was able to make it up. I’m pretty sure that Ernie and his son went up the middle of the obstacle, but I’m not 100% sure. Tim had gone back in search of his nephew’s missing telephone. Larry did not have any interest in trying the difficult left line due to apparent COG issues.

    Standing on the little waterfall and looking further down the trail, there were three climbs within sight: Easy climb on the left, nasty looking rocky climb in the middle and a dirtbike path on the right. All three climbs started a descent at the top, and we could not see what was on the other side. I told the guys that in 2004, I had taken the center rough line and made it on 38’s when others were apparently afraid of it/not interested in trying it. It looked quite a bit nastier now than it did then. Stroud said he wasn’t making any promises, but he was going to walk over & check it out. The rest of us stayed put, and Steve walked the 50-75 yards ahead. Steve stood at the bottom of the obstacle and the first ledge was nearly to his waist. Hopefully someone has pictures of this spot. After the first steep ledge, there is another ledge, then the climb to the top. The length of the climb is roughly “2-3 Buford lengths.” Steve walked back to his Sami, and we all watched with interest. He pulled the nose of the Sami up on the rock, and the engine observed to be grunting. I hollered down to Milliron (who was closer to Steve) to ask him if he had it in second gear, as I wasn’t used to hearing the Sami’s engine grunt….generally it simply “revs up & starts spinning the tires at a rapid rate.” Steve said that it was in first gear, and he was “right on the verge of using the 4bbl.” He stated that he didn’t want to thrash on the AOD trans too much, because he needed to get a few more rides out of it. It should be noted that Steve is waiting on a custom adapter to mate his C6 to his T-case. Steve backed off the obstacle.

    With the same attitude as Steve, the “I’ll drive the nose up on it and get a feel for it before committing to it” approach, I started the Ford and waddled the nose up onto the rock. Traction observed to be good. There was a little wiggle room on both sides, but if someone were to commit to the climb at this point, and the front were to slide very far in either direction, one would likely roll off the rock sideways. I gave the 469 progressive throttle. Buford started moving…resisting the urge to put the throttle down & hold on, I kept going slowly forward with the idea that if it started slipping and sliding, I was letting off, hitting neutral, and letting the truck get back to the bottom by gravity. With the engine grunting at ¼ throttle, the truck simply kept moving. With the 42’s aired down to 8 psi front and 5 psi rear, it was getting excellent traction. Once near the top, I gave it a little more throttle to clear the top of the climb, and I was to the other side. It did not spin at any point. There was some room to turn around on the other side, but I decided to simply back down the easy left trail. I had Milliron spot, and less than a minute later, I was back with the dudes at the bottom.

    At this point we had an informal driver meeting, and decided we wanted the quickest & easiest way back to the campsite. Stroud and Larry had plans on Sunday, and weren’t camping. They also had to de-bead two trailer tires, add the two new trailer tires, and replace a couple valve stems, load both vehicles, etc. One of the two guys that started riding with us knew his way around the trails, and the other guy didn’t. I knew that I could get us back to the campground by backtracking every trail that we had ran, but I seriously doubted that was the quickest option. The guy in the Suzuki was the one that knew the area, and he advised that he could get us back to the campsite pretty quick. He stated that he could also show us where the Twister trail was at on the way out. We started following them. I told Jamie to drive the Ford. Stroud had Ernie’s younger son driving his Suzuki, and Tim had his nephew driving the Jeep…we should be on cruise control for the trip back to camp. Lambert stopped by in his dune buggy.

    He advised that he had put 32 miles on the buggy during the day. We told him we were heading out, and we figured we would just follow him. I told Mike that we wanted the quickest & easiest way back to camp. He asked, “Do you guys want any kind of trail ride, or just fastest & easiest.” I advised that we wanted “fastest & easiest.” We started following Mike and soon found ourselves on a tight & narrow shelf trail that puts the driver side near the edge and the passenger side up against the embankment. Jamie commented about the choice of the trail, and I commented back on multiple occasions. At one point, I advised Jamie to get the passenger side of the truck up against the embankment. Jamie did a good job of driving on the tight trail in a relatively unfamiliar vehicle. At one point, there was a sharp left downhill turn that required about a 10 point turn to get the Ford around it.

    When we went to reverse, we noticed that Steve’s Samurai was literally within inches of the trailgate of the Ford. I motioned for them to back up. After a short while, everyone figured out that they needed to back up to give us some room to turn. I later found out that there was some sort of braking issue (couldn’t push the pedal far enough due to something?) Not sure. Steve can clear that up. Ernie’s son later said that Steve was saying something to the effect of “Uh oh, this isn’t good” when they were getting close to the back of the Ford. If they had hit me, I wouldn’t have cared, and due to the sharp turn and being up against and embankment in front of the truck, we wouldn’t have gone anywhere. I commented more than once that I seriously doubted this was the “fastest & easiest” way back to camp. After everyone backed up, Jamie was able to successfully get the Ford around the turn. A short distance further, we had to make another 90 turn downhill, with a large rut on the middle of the turn. This took quite a bit of finagling on Jamie’s part, and several more comments were made about the choice of this trail to get us back to camp. As Jamie had the truck turned as sharp as it would go, the right front started to go into the ravine. I do not have proof, but I’m nearly certain that the driver rear tire of the Ford started going up in the air. A hollered for Jamie to hit the gas, he did, and we made it to the bottom. Mike was sitting at the bottom in the buggy. I asked him what was the deal with taking that trail as the “quickest & easiest” way back to camp? He laughed & said that “I thought you said you wanted the shortest way back to camp…that was the shortest.” Mike is a pretty smart guy and I’m pretty sure that he knows the difference between “quickest” “fastest” and “shortest.”

    It took a while for the others to get to the bottom, but after a short while, we were heading up the trail Mike called Stagecoach. About 15 minutes later, we arrived back at camp. Interestingly enough, the guys we originally were following had ran the Twister trail, and made it back to camp well before we had.

    Jamie spotted me as I loaded the Ford onto the trailer, and grabbed a Miller High Life (It’s the champagne of beers….it says so right on the bottle) out of the cooler in the tow rig, and strapped down the Ford. Steve bummed a few valve stems out of Buford’s ashtray for his trailer issues, and went about dismounting, mounting, and putting the wheels & tires on his trailer.

    Milliron who hasn’t consumed alcohol in 18 years or so was the DD. I rode shotgun, Brent & Jamie rode in the back of his topless/doorless TJ, as we headed into town. We ended up back at the Cove for a few beers & some bar snacks. Jamie & Brent had Bud Light on draft for 95 cents per glass. I don’t dig light beer and drank regular Busch out of a can. (I’m all about class). After we got something to ate, I threw down a couple double martinis with extra olives before leaving the establishment. It was nearly dark when we left. Other than stopping for some ice and smokes, we went straight back to camp.

    We all sat around the campfire & BS’d about of a variety of topics. Lambert checked in around 11:00 or so, and the rest of us crashed soon after.

    There were some more noise issues in the middle of the night with a buggy or quad…not sure which but it ticked of a few of the light sleepers. Sunday morning, everyone was up by 6:30 am. Brent headed out around 7:30 am. Jamie, Milliron, and I left at 8:00 am. Jamie headed out of the campsite in a different direction than Mike and I. Mike followed me almost to Cambridge, when he called & advised that he was off the interstate to get fuel. I told Mike that I was happy with the 4.10 gears in the Ford tow rig. Mike was towing a near 2000 lb pop-up camper with his 4.0, 5 speed, 4.56 geared TJ, and he noted that my cheap pile of tow rig (well he didn’t call it that, but I know what it is) took the hills on the interstate better than his Jeep did. 3000 rpm @ 70 mph start the long hills on I-70 and on only one of them did I drop below 55 or 60 mph. For a 351 with headers & flowmasters & no other work that I’m aware of, I’m pretty surprised that it could pull well over 15,000 total pounds around and keep up with traffic on the interstate. Anyway, I wished Mike a good weekend, and kept going. Lambert was the last to leave, and passed me in Duncan Falls, about 3 miles from my house. He waved & I waved back.

    I arrived home at exactly 10:30 am. It had been precisely 51 hours since I had had a shower, and I smelled rather foul. Took a shower, deodorized, etc, and enjoyed the rest of the day.

    This was definitely one of the better trips of 2006. Looking forward to leading for the first time in September for our club ride……

    Roy
     
  2. 78Buford

    78Buford 1/2 ton status

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  3. 78Buford

    78Buford 1/2 ton status

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    This is the Ugly trail from bottom to the top:

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  4. noahrob

    noahrob 1/2 ton status Author

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    Man, what a beautiful color green...those pictures are great! We never get that color out here on the west coast...
     
  5. 78Buford

    78Buford 1/2 ton status

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    Rest of the pictures taken by Tim Hoy (Guy that broke the rear axle on the TJ) are here:


    http://timahoy.spaces.live.com/



    Their should be others pictures whenever the other guys get them posted.

    Here are a couple more:

    Buford's Daddy...aka "The trail Jerry made it up last year I couldn't/can't." The pictures do it no justice whatsoever. The steep ledge where Steve (guy in blue shorts) is standing is the relatively easy part. The undercut ledge (above his head in the picture) is the nasty spot.

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    Looking down the Ugly Trail:

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  6. jekquistk5

    jekquistk5 Weld nekid Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    sounds like a good trip... and ck5 logged me out before I got done reading it..lol
     
  7. 78Buford

    78Buford 1/2 ton status

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  8. JK5

    JK5 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    Nice write-up.:D :bow: :bow:

    I wish I could have gone...
    I've been lost without my rig this year....web wheelin' sucks.

    Keep trying that trail I've conquered...you'll get it.:wink1:
     
  9. 78Buford

    78Buford 1/2 ton status

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    I kinda doubt I'm gonna make it. It's significantly rougher on the right side than it used to be...the left side (by left side I mean where the left front tire hits is) doesn't look much different. The right side is more dug out/undercut. When I couldn't make it in the past, the front would hit & I'd go backwards. Now when you hit it, it throws you to the right side everytime. In the summer of 2005 when you made it, I was able to get the nose over it, but couldn't get the rear over it. At the time the 460 was pretty weak in regards to wheelspeed. Also, at the time, I was running around 12 psi front/10 psi rear in the tires. The engine is significantly more powerful now....and I even ran less air pressure on this trip....8psi front & 5 psi rear....and I can't even get the nose over it. :o

    The best chance would be to go first & hit it crazy hard on the first attempt or two before the rocks get greasy & nasty....

    Any idea idea on when you'll be out again? The last pictures I looked at of your Blazer, it was down to the frame...that was late May or early June.

    Roy
     
  10. JK5

    JK5 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    I've been taking my time on this project, ok...dragging my ass.
    I hope to have it going in a month...;)

    I think your wheel base, maybe the problem...
    hitting bumps front and rear at the same time.

    Back in Jan., I pulled it off again...I here you about getting thrown around.
    I aimed for the left, then used a gallon of gas...
    That's how I made it last time.:D :D

    LOL...you didn't try the climb at the enterance???
     
  11. 78Buford

    78Buford 1/2 ton status

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    Location:
    Ohio
    I didn't, but I'm fairly sure that I have a decent chance to climb it...I see the low COG & long wheelbase as being a strength on that obstacle (entrance hill obstacle).

    I'll be going back to Wellsville in September...maybe I'll try it after the ride. A few of our club members plan to go to Harlan KY in early November...exact date not set as of yet...PM me if interested...likely be leaving Ohio on a Thursday, renting a few cabins near the trails, wheeling Friday, staying again, wheeling Saturday, staying again, and leaving for home early Sunday AM. I've never been there, so it will all be new terrain to me.

    Roy
     

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