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What do I do first?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by retired-bob, Sep 12, 2003.

  1. retired-bob

    retired-bob Newbie

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    I just bought a beater stock 73. I drove it from Denver to Durango, no smoke no problems. I want to make this a dependable road and trail rig. I'm not sure what to do first? I think all new bushings and then a 4" tough country ez-ride. I also want a new seat with additional leg room.Thanks from a first timer. /forums/images/graemlins/1zhelp.gif
     
  2. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Sounds like a perfectly reasonable plan! /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif

    It's a 30-year old truck, so plan accordingly.... pretty much anything rubber is going to be rotten, well-worn or both. Greaseable new suspension bushings can make a big difference, and the soft T.C. springs will be a nice improvement.

    From my own personal, experience I would suggest going no larger than 35" radial tires if you still want a nice streetable truck. My truck drove pretty nice when it was still at 4" of lift and 35's....every change since then has been a step in the "wrong" direction as far as comfort is concerned. /forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif
     
  3. rjfguitar

    rjfguitar 3/4 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    [ QUOTE ]
    ....every change since then has been a step in the "wrong" direction as far as comfort is concerned. /forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif


    [/ QUOTE ]
    Yep, thats what happens though... I just want a set of decent radial mud terrains...(A year later) Ah, Ill go with the boggers this time with a few extra inches. Then that gas sucking cammed up motor comes into play and finally you go with the big heavy duty axles and end up with a truck that is a pain in the ass to use as a daily driver. /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif

    -------------------
    85K5 3/4ton,14boltFF,10bolt,9"lift,35"boggers,16.5x14welds, big horse 406SBC/700R4 /forums/images/graemlins/k5.gif /forums/images/graemlins/angryfire.gif
     
  4. Shaggy

    Shaggy 3/4 ton status

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    The first thing to do is to go over the truck with a fine tooth comb and replace everything that has been neglected for the past 30 years. There are a couple of reasons for this, the primary one being that you'll know that everything is good to go. The other reason is that it gives you a chance to look over most of the vital bits on the truck to make sure that they're in good shape, kind of like an introduction to your junk. This would include, but is not limited to (deep breath here)...

    [*]Basic tune-up including spark plugs, cap, rotor, plug wires, air filter, oil change, etc.
    [*]Replace any worn vaccuum lines and rubber parts on the drivetrain, including breather lines
    [*]Change all fluids in tranny, transfer case and axles, flush radiator and refill
    [*]Inspect and replace as neccessary all tie rod ends, ball joints, drag link ends, etc.
    [*]Inspect and replace as necessary all u-joints and steering joints (these are usually neglected so it's likely a good idea to replace them anyways. Odds are at least a couple of them are original. /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif)
    [*]Check the truck for burnt out light bulbs bypassed fuses and fusible links and faulty wiring that could cause a fire hazard
    [*]Inspect brake lines and fuel lines, replacing any worn section as necessary. This includes old brittle fuel lines.
    [*]Inspect and likely replace all body mounts, they are generally neglected and make a HUGE difference in the way the truck feels on the road.
    [*]As mentioned above, replace all the worn rubber parts with poly. ALot of this can be done when you do a lift, but engine mounts and tranny mounts should be replaced too. Rubber mounts on the engine and tranny will be fine if you prefer them, but stick to the same material for both mounts, don't mix rubber tranny mount with poly engine mounts, or vice versa.

    This is pretty cursory list just off the top of my head, but I've always said that the first thing to do with any "new to you" vehicle is to remedy all of the problems and maintenance issues that the previous owner overlooked. Spending a bunch of money on a lift and tires would really suck if the thing feels dangerous at any speed over 55 mph or bursts into flames in the parking lot at the mall.
    Good luck, and welcome to CK5! /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  5. 75-K5

    75-K5 3/4 ton status

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    Sorry, here's what Shaggy meant to say:

    <font color="green"> The first thing to do is to go over the truck with a fine tooth comb and replace everything that has been neglected for the past 30 years. There are a couple of reasons for this, the primary one being that you'll know that everything is good to go. The other reason is that it gives you a chance to look over most of the vital bits on the truck to make sure that they're in good shape, kind of like an introduction to your junk. This would include, but is not limited to (deep breath here)...

    # Basic tune-up including spark plugs, cap, rotor, plug wires, air filter, oil change, etc.
    # Replace any worn vaccuum lines and rubber parts on the drivetrain, including breather lines
    # Change all fluids in tranny, transfer case and axles, flush radiator and refill
    # Inspect and replace as neccessary all tie rod ends, ball joints, drag link ends, etc.
    # Inspect and replace as necessary all u-joints and steering joints (these are usually neglected so it's likely a good idea to replace them anyways. Odds are at least a couple of them are original. )
    # Check the truck for burnt out light bulbs bypassed fuses and fusible links and faulty wiring that could cause a fire hazard
    # Inspect brake lines and fuel lines, replacing any worn section as necessary. This includes old brittle fuel lines.
    # Inspect and likely replace all body mounts, they are generally neglected and make a HUGE difference in the way the truck feels on the road.
    # As mentioned above, replace all the worn rubber parts with poly. ALot of this can be done when you do a lift, but engine mounts and tranny mounts should be replaced too. Rubber mounts on the engine and tranny will be fine if you prefer them, but stick to the same material for both mounts, don't mix rubber tranny mount with poly engine mounts, or vice versa.

    This is pretty cursory list just off the top of my head, but I've always said that the first thing to do with any "new to you" vehicle is to remedy all of the problems and maintenance issues that the previous owner overlooked. Spending a bunch of money on a lift and tires would really suck if the thing feels dangerous at any speed over 55 mph or bursts into flames in the parking lot at the mall.
    Good luck, and welcome to CK5! </font>
     
  6. Shaggy

    Shaggy 3/4 ton status

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    /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif

    I've been requested to not use green text anymore, I guess it's hard to read for those using different skins. So I am attempting to assimilate myself into the herd and use boring old black text. /forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif
     
  7. jekbrown

    jekbrown I am CK5 Premium Member GMOTM Winner Author

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    [ QUOTE ]
    My truck drove pretty nice when it was still at 4" of lift and 35's....every change since then has been a step in the "wrong" direction as far as comfort is concerned. /forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif

    [/ QUOTE ]

    you know a lot of people say this, but I havent really noticed it in my rig. My rig rides best and is the most cozy when it has the 39.5s on there... I dunno, maybe its cause my front springs are pretty stiff and the extra weight helps. In any case, I think having good quality seats has more to do with comfort than any other single factor. Besides, nothing puts a big /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif on my face like rollin on the 39s. /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif

    j
     
  8. gravdigr

    gravdigr 1/2 ton status

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    don't forget brakes. Odds are those bleeders arer rusted shut. On my 79 it got a full brake job ie. rear drums, pads, cylinders, hardware kit, hard and soft lines. And on the front luckily my rotors were fine but I still had to replace pads, caliper, soft lines, hard lines to the proportioning valve, and master cylinder.

    All go and no stop is A Bad Thing tm
     

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