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What do you think??

Discussion in 'Audio' started by 72GMCJIMMY, Mar 18, 2003.

  1. 72GMCJIMMY

    72GMCJIMMY 1/2 ton status

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  2. VA-NC-SC

    VA-NC-SC Registered Member

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    what do you plan to do with it? I have never heard of that brand really, only on ebay, anybody else know anything about them? Do you plan to run a sub and speakers, just a sub, just speakers...?
     
  3. 72GMCJIMMY

    72GMCJIMMY 1/2 ton status

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    I wanted a 5 channel amp to run front speakers, rear speakers and a sub.
    I don't know much about amps, but I would like to find a good inexpensive amp not a cheap amp.
    Thanks
     
  4. Z3PR

    Z3PR Banned

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    I would go with 2 amps. One 4 channel amp for your front and rear speakers, and a mono amp for your sub(s)
     
  5. 72GMCJIMMY

    72GMCJIMMY 1/2 ton status

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    I was hoping to cut down on space and wiring using one amp. What would be the advantage of two amps?
    Thanks /forums/images/graemlins/usaflag.gif
     
  6. Z3PR

    Z3PR Banned

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    Most mono amps have built in low pass filter. That alowe it to only reproduce the bass. So your sub(s) will sound better. And a 4 channel amp for the rest of the speakers will let them play louder and clearer without having to work to produce the bass.
     
  7. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    A lot of companies now make "special" subwoofer amps.....I think they are "Class D"?.....anyway, they aren't really even designed to produce full frequency range (20Hz - 20000Hz) so they're optimized for low frequency stuff only.

    Keep in mind, low bass can typically have more distortion than the other speakers. I think you can have something up to around 10% distortion and most people couldn't even hear that distortion is happening. You wouldn't get away with distortion like that on other speakers in your system....

    So basically, a subwoofer amp can be better optimized for the task to produce MORE power, and probably at a better price-point than an all-purpose amp would.

    JL Audio comes to mind as a company building amps specifically for subs (kinda makes sense!) /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif
     
  8. 72GMCJIMMY

    72GMCJIMMY 1/2 ton status

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    My head unit has a sub woofer cut off frequency control ( low 50hz mid 80hz high 115hz) to the sub channel.
    Would this make a difference? Greg72 this response is for you also. So is the thanks
     
  9. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Generally I avoid using the deck for signal splitting (in this case we're talking about the low-pass features of your deck)....it might work OK, but odds are there will be a better quality crossover in one of the other components (like the amp, if it's a more modern one)


    The key is understanding not only the "frequency" that is supported (in your case 50Hz, 80Hz, and 115Hz) but also the "slope" of the crossover. Generally, I like to use really "steep" slopes for subwoofers....like 18dB/octave. 24 db/octave would be even nicer, but I've never owned equipment that could do that. The reason is that at low freqencies, an "octave" covers a lot of ground (1st octave is 20Hz to 40Hz...2nd Octave is 40Hz to 80Hz....3rd Octave is 80Hz to 160Hz). Once you get above 80Hz....you really aren't "subwoofing" anymore! /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif That's more of what I would call "upper bass", and most decent midrange speakers can start taking over at those frequencies.

    So if you have a typical 12db/octave crossover set at 80Hz....and you play the system at say 100dB....that means that frequencies at 160Hz are STILL playing at 88dB through your subs!!!! That's still a LOT!!!......the effect you'll hear is that you'll be able to detect where the subwoofers are located in the vehicle, and certain notes that normally come from the front of the vehicle's soundstage, will start "smearing" and get pulled towards the rear (if that's where the subs are)


    By using a "steep" crossover (18 or 24dB) you can cut the unwanted frequencies much more aggressively, and the subs will sound better and be more "seamless" with the rest of the system.

    Is that more than you wanted to know??? /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  10. Z3PR

    Z3PR Banned

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    Found a serous amp for your sub(s) on Ebay If I had the money, I'd buy it. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     

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