Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

what gas for welder

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by joker89blazer, Dec 25, 2002.

  1. joker89blazer

    joker89blazer 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2001
    Posts:
    130
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    panama city florida zip 32409
    I have a small 120 volt wire feed welder. I have been using flux core wire.I hate the way it splatters and does not give pretty weld beads.

    It came with a kit for a small gas bottle to mount on the back of the welder and a regulator.

    If I use c02 it is stored as liquid form in the tank so it should give more use than a tank of mixed gases stored as vapor in a tank, RIGHT??

    Would the weld quality be ok?
    If mixed gas is prefered,which one?
     
  2. 87sm465np208

    87sm465np208 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2002
    Posts:
    1,114
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    illinois
    93 octane useually provides a good mix. /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif


    /forums/images/graemlins/usaflag.gif /forums/images/graemlins/truck.gif
     
  3. joker89blazer

    joker89blazer 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2001
    Posts:
    130
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    panama city florida zip 32409
    I have to admit,I didn't think about using that.
    hmmmmmm.,so that's how them pro welders burn in a good weld. /forums/images/graemlins/rolleyes.gif
     
  4. Bubba Ray Boudreaux

    Bubba Ray Boudreaux 1 ton status

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2001
    Posts:
    20,716
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Undisclosed Location
    75% CO2 and 25% Argon. Clean, smooth welds.
     
  5. joker89blazer

    joker89blazer 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2001
    Posts:
    130
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    panama city florida zip 32409
    Thanks for the help bubba.

    Any idea if I can buy a small tank for that gas mix are is the tanks the same for all mixes???

    Is there a certain quality of weld wire to use for better welds on mild steel???
     
  6. Bubba Ray Boudreaux

    Bubba Ray Boudreaux 1 ton status

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2001
    Posts:
    20,716
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Undisclosed Location
    I've got a real small tank on mine, it's only about 1.5 ft tall, lasts maybe a total of 5 hours of solid welding. Once I get to welding more often, I'm gonna ditch it and go bigger.

    I think I'm using the ER-70 Lincoln wire, .030.
     
  7. joker89blazer

    joker89blazer 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2001
    Posts:
    130
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    panama city florida zip 32409
    That sounds like what I need.
    Did you buy that are rent?
     
  8. Bubba Ray Boudreaux

    Bubba Ray Boudreaux 1 ton status

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2001
    Posts:
    20,716
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Undisclosed Location
    Correct that wire, it's the SuperArc L-56 wire that I'm using on recommendation of a fabricator/racer.
     
  9. Ck1500

    Ck1500 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2001
    Posts:
    198
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Burton, Michigan
    i use a Argon and C02 mix,

    comes already mixed from welding place though /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif

    sorry i don't know the right ratio, but hopes this helps

    Ck1500 /forums/images/graemlins/ears.gif
     
  10. boots

    boots 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2002
    Posts:
    183
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Foothills of CA (Mariposa)
    cost wise run co2, but you'll get better welds and better looking welds with the 75/25 argon/co2 mix. wanna really have some fun? IF you don't like the penetration you are getting from the 110 with shielded gas and regular wire run dual shield, flux core and the shielding gas. if I recall correctly when you switch from flux core to regular wire you need to change polarity, if you are running dual sheild I think you go back to the flux core polarity. We seldom change the setups at work as the dual sheild machines are dedicated to one assembly, 3/4 steel to shedule 80 8 inch pipe. I'll check polarity tomorrow and let you know.
     
  11. laketex

    laketex 3/4 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    6,220
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North Texas
    75/25 is a good mix for general use, but for really good penetration from your 110, try some 98/2% oxygen. It's more expensive and you get more spatter though. You definately get a stronger, deeper penetration from flux core than you do from 75/25, but you're right, the bead isn't quite as pretty. /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  12. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2000
    Posts:
    36,188
    Likes Received:
    1,396
    Location:
    E-town baby!
    98/2 with a bit more voltage will make a pretty weld with very little spatter. Dual Shield FC with CO2 is hard to beat for looks and penetration though. I like the Lincoln 71M for dual shield wire. It's an all position wire that's very easy to use, digs hard and looks smooth as glass after being chipped.

    Rene
     
  13. joker89blazer

    joker89blazer 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2001
    Posts:
    130
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    panama city florida zip 32409
    Are you saying it is better to run the regular flux core wire AND shelding gas?

    Is the tanks the same for the differant gas mixes?

    Thanks for the info. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  14. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2000
    Posts:
    36,188
    Likes Received:
    1,396
    Location:
    E-town baby!
    There are two main types of flux cored wire. Single shield (no gas) and dual shield. Dual shield uses the flux in the center of the wire plus a shield gas...typically CO2. All "Shields" do is provide an inert environment around the arc. Without this inert environment you get gas bubbles in the weldment which is bad.

    The three main groups of MIG processes are:

    Microwire...solid steel wire with a copper coating, gas shield required. CO2, 75/25, 98/2, COOGAR etc etc
    Single shield flux core...no gas shield necessary, flux inside the wire.
    Dual shield flux core...gas shield plus flux in the center of the wire.CO2 most common.

    Hope that clears things up a bit.

    Rene
     
  15. Zeus33rd

    Zeus33rd Smarter than you GMOTM Winner

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Posts:
    7,324
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Grass Valley, CA
    </font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
    Dual shield flux core...gas shield plus flux in the center of the wire.CO2 most common.


    [/ QUOTE ]

    Hmm...I'm running a pretty unremarkable set up now....the micro wire, ER70S-6 .035 wire with the Gold Gas (75/25) in my Lincoln Power Mig 200...I would like to grab a spool of dual shield wire as well. Rene- You say the Lincoln 71M is a good DS wire? Can I run the Gold Gas with it? Can you reccomend a wire size for my machine? .045? or bigger?
     
  16. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2000
    Posts:
    36,188
    Likes Received:
    1,396
    Location:
    E-town baby!
    Yes 71M is a nice DS wire. I've used it mostly with straight CO2, but have used other shields with it. The CO2 makes the puddle freeze a little faster, so if you're using any gas with Argon in it you'll likely lose the "All position" capability but get an even smoother final product in the flat and horizontal positions. With CO2 you can do vertical uphand with 71M and look like a hero. It just takes some patience to find the sweet spot setting wise.

    With your machine I would go ither .035 or .045, I'm leaning towards .035 unless you commonly weld 3/8" plate. As you probably know the flux is partially comprised of iron powder much the same as a jet rod...

    The reason I'd lean towards the .035 is heat. With the Argon mix and .045 I needed an asbestos shield on my leather glove to keep from blistering my hand. Run a smaller wire and the heat should be tolerable.

    Rene
     
  17. Zeus33rd

    Zeus33rd Smarter than you GMOTM Winner

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Posts:
    7,324
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Grass Valley, CA
    I remember running the big ass innershield stuff in welding school....No $hit on the blistering your hand thing. We'd go through gloves like crazy....Intructor hated it when someone got to the innershield stuff....he handed out alot of new gloves. /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif I don't commonly weld 3/8's plate but I think that there would be ocasions that I would be working with heavier plate...So maybe I'll check out the .045 stuff. Can you get this stuff in the smaller 10lb spools? Or do I have to buy a 33 or 44lb spool like I have with the hard wire stuff?
     
  18. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2000
    Posts:
    36,188
    Likes Received:
    1,396
    Location:
    E-town baby!
    I'm not sure...the smallest rolls I've seen it come in is 25 lb (10" plastic spool) You'd have to check your local welding supply place...just make sure they carry Lincoln wire.

    rene
     
  19. joker89blazer

    joker89blazer 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2001
    Posts:
    130
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    panama city florida zip 32409
    Hmmmmmm. Just one more question.

    Is there a small tank that will run all the diferant gas mixes and co2 are they all differant?

    Thanks for the help, it sounds like you know this stuff real well
     
  20. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2000
    Posts:
    36,188
    Likes Received:
    1,396
    Location:
    E-town baby!
    They're different. The most economical way to set yourself up is to rent or lease the bottles. It's a fairly small sum...something like $40 a year plus whatever refills you need.

    CO2 uses a different regulator adaptor than O2 and Argon mix gases...so you may need to buy the necessary adaptors to be able to run both. Also the flowmeters are usually labeled on 4 sides for the different gases. The density of the gases means the same scale doesn't work for different gases.

    At work we have most machines set up to hold two bottles. The machines for steel only have one CO2 bottle and one Argon mix bottle.
    We have another machine for MIG aluminum and steel, it has an Argon mix (75/25) and a straight Argon.
    Our TIG welder has a 75/25 bottle and a Helium/Argon mix bottle.

    That gets us as versatile as we need to be without having to roll bottles in and out of the bottle compound all day long.

    A quick note I'll add. Bottles need to be safety chained wherever they are. Never move or unchain a bottle without the regulator cap in place. If you have a bottle storage area make sure the bottles are safely chained so they cannot fall and that all unused bottles have caps in place.

    Also regularly test your gas lines for leaks...almost any inert gas has the capabilty to rapidly asphixiate you in a small area. CO2 is colorless and odorless.

    Rene
     

Share This Page