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What size air compressor should I get?

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by WARP1, Dec 22, 2001.

  1. WARP1

    WARP1 Registered Member

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    I'm moving into an apartment with a 2 car gaarage and a 1 car garage. I plan to start a rebuild project on my '73 Blazer. The tub is good, but I'll have to replace most body panels (except the hood). I'll need to paint, grind, and operate an impact wrench. I do have 220 volt power.

    '73 Blazer, 4" lift, 33" BFG Muds
     
  2. fortcollinsram

    fortcollinsram 1/2 ton status

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    Personally, I like those 60 Gallon Craftsman Professional compressors...If you get the 2 stage one...they are pretty quiet as well...check it out...for a compressor like this though, look at dropping like $750-900...

    Was that a speed bump? No, just a Rice Rocket </font color=red> <a target="_blank" href=http://coloradok5.com/gallery/fortcollinsram>My 87 Blazer</a>
     
  3. hammer

    hammer 1/2 ton status

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    as much as you can afford cuz if you start running a grinder or sander 95% of the commpressors can't keep up with you you will run out of air. I have one but it's not enough Home depot has a Ingersaw Rand 2-stage for approx $900 that one shoud keep up

    <font color=red>Let me at it I can break it</font color=red>
     
  4. RaisedK5

    RaisedK5 1/2 ton status

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    Just make sure you really have 220 going into it. At work we've killed three compressors in the last couple years, finally we found out that it was because we really have 208 and that had some bad effects on the electric motor, there are transformers available to step it up to the correct voltage. But ya a nice big 60 gal 2 stage would probably do the job for you.

    Leland aka RaisedK5

    "Of all the things I've lost, I think I miss my mind the most!"
    "Are the voices in my head bothering you?
     
  5. jwduke

    jwduke 1/2 ton status

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    Well, I've got one of those Craftsman 6hp, oiless compressers, with a 33 gal tank, that runs off 110. Well, i've yet to run it out of air using my I/R grinder. They are fairly quiet too. Plus, I think they are on sale this week!

    1 ton '87 Chevy SWB in the making!
     
  6. hammer

    hammer 1/2 ton status

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    I have the craftman 6hp oilless 33 stand up and I run out all the time with sanders and grinders

    <font color=red>Let me at it I can break it</font color=red>
     
  7. TheGeneral

    TheGeneral 1/2 ton status

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    Not to badmouth any compressors, but from numerous compressor experiences, go as big as you can afford, don't go with oiless (2 dam loud and oil ones when looked after will last forever), and be sure and get a quality regulator, filter, and oiler. When you do an inline oiler at tank, you will need to make a T so you have two lines, one that is dry (before oiler) and one that is oil output. This will make your tools last forever. I still have a sander of my dads, it must be over 20 years old and works great (that is the difference between oiled and not oiled). Two stage compressor is something else you want. About 1K will get you a nice compressor capable of everything short of running a commercial garage. my 2cents worth.

    If you ain't hurt, you ain't playin' hard enough.

    The General
     
  8. chevyracing

    chevyracing 1/2 ton status

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    A 60 gallon 2 stage is the way to go. Ingersol-Rand makes a good one for around 600 bucks. 2 stage is best for running a D.A. or sandblasters, big impacts, etc because they keep a good steady air flow. You need to be able to maintain 90 PSI and around 10 CFM.

    John

    Like to go sloppin' 'round in da mud in a rapid fashion....=)

    <a target="_blank" href=http://coloradok5.com/gallery/albun31?&page=1>BLAZER PICS</a>
     
  9. BadDog

    BadDog SOL Staff Member Super Moderator Author

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    For most home shop uses, a 60 gal single stage will do fine. I used one for many years, even doing commercial body/frame work out of my own home shop. I didn't step up to a 2 stage till I opened my 6 bay body/frame shop. And then it was a monster. Just make sure it will maintain 9-10 cfm at 90 psi. That requirement excludes the cheapos that won't keep up but still allows you to save a few hundred over a 2 stage while still running most any tool. It will still run a DA or inline sander, you will just need to take a break once in a while to let the compressor refill and cool off. Sort of like duty cycle on a welder, most of the time you don't use it constantly for that long anyway, so it's not an issue.

    The General is dead on about the filter/oiler/regulator setup as well as the "oil-less compressors". "Just say no" to oil-less compressors. Only thing he didn't mention is that you don't want to use the same hose on the oiled and oil-less sides. You use the oiled line for all your tools. Use the oil-less when painting or sandblasting, etc. I used a red line for the oiled side and a yellow for the oil-less so that I could easily keep them separate.

    For what it's worth I did a few other things that worked out well. I also ran a loop of tubing up the wall and back down again to a water trap. Works sort of like a still so that the air can cool and water vapor can condense and run back to the tank or into the trap. Depending on the tank is not a good idea in humid areas. After the trap, I ran to the filter, then the regulator, followed by a T for the oil-less quick connector, followed by the oiler, followed by another quick connector. For times when I want maximum flow, I had a quick connect right off the tank. Won't hurt to use without the oiler with tools once in a while and it can be really good for sandblasting as long as humidity is not too high. For convenience I also had plumbed my whole shop with quick connects spaced around like electrical outlets. The shop plumbing was pressurized from the non-oil side. Makes things much easier painting. Before that I messed up several paint jobs trying to drag around a long hose when a loop decided to flip up and untwist right into a freshly sprayed panel. Just don't ever run the oiler line through it or you'll never get the oil out, which ruins paint. Again, it doesn't hurt to run tools without the oiler once in a while. I've even worked in shops with no oiler at all. Just put a few drops of air tool oil (or ATF in a pinch) into the quick fitting on the tool before each use.

    Russ

    85 K30 CUCV, 350 TBI, TH400, 205, D60/C14, 4.56 Locked
    Some day: 4" lift, 44" tires, massive cutting, shorter wb and rear overhang.
     
  10. Twiz

    Twiz 1/2 ton status

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    I've used all kinds of compressors. From single cyl 3 gal, to 2 motor 2-stage 80 gal. at the shop (I swear this things been on the verge of kicking a rod out for the past year-) Air-pressure is you friend.

    At home, I had a 220v, 2-cyl, single stage oil-less 60-gal. It worked O.K. for the price. I eventualy blew the guts out-of-it, I can tell you that a direct drive motor spinning at 2000 RPMs and locking up a piston- tends to scatter parts- big-time.

    I steped up to a 220v, 4-cyl, single stage with a 60. It would fill the 60 gallon tank in seconds, so I tied in the old 60 gallon tank to the sys (for total of 120 gallons). I couldn't be happier, this thing rocks! It could hold it's own compared to a 2-stage, but doesn't have the PSI (or the price) of a 2-stage.

    I also have a in-line oiler with a T-fitting, my "dry" hose was still getting oil in it, so I had to put in a ball-valve to block off the oiler and keep it from back-flowing into the "dry" hose.


    <font color=blue>Wow factors
    A SBC (4" X 3.48") with 2" intake-valve at 6,000 RPMs:
    1- The piston reaches a maximum speed of 60 MPH
     
  11. TheGeneral

    TheGeneral 1/2 ton status

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    Yea, I forgot about the hoses, but I have two different colors too, and what Twistid said about shutting off oil bleed backwards is true. I put in a valve before the oiler to prevent this, I probably would never had known that when I started, but my grandad told me about it, sure saves a paint job.

    If you ain't hurt, you ain't playin' hard enough.

    The General
     
  12. BadDog

    BadDog SOL Staff Member Super Moderator Author

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    Ooops! I forgot the valves. Mine had 2. One directly off the tank before anything else. The second between the oil-less line and the oiler.

    Russ

    85 K30 CUCV, 350 TBI, TH400, 205, D60/C14, 4.56 Locked
    Some day: 4" lift, 44" tires, massive cutting, shorter wb and rear overhang.
     
  13. sinchphoto

    sinchphoto 1/2 ton status

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    i got a 6hp 20gal. its not that big but for what i use it for it serves me well. taking off wheels, suspension, engine stuff, bumpers etc.. got it for 100 bux and i like it. If i had more cash Id get a big Craftsman. but im cool for now.
     
  14. Twiz

    Twiz 1/2 ton status

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    Good point, Get what you can! You really don't need a monster compressor for impacts.But once you get used to useing air, you'll never want to go back!

    That Craftsman direct-drive 2-stage 30 gal unit, doesn't sound like a bad idea to me for a intro unit. (I've never used one tho')

    <font color=blue>Wow factors
    A SBC at 6,000 RPMs:
    2- The piston travels from O to 60 MPH to 0 in just .005 of a sec. and in just 7 inches.<P ID="edit"><FONT class="small">Edited by Twiztid on 12/24/01 11:42 PM.</FONT></P>
     
  15. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    My dream compressor is that monster Ingersol-Rand at Home Depot. 80 gallon tank, 6HP 2-stage compressor. Even at this altitude, that bad boy should be able to keep up with any of my air tools. My die grinder seems to be the worst air user. It uses air like the end of the hose has been cut off. [​IMG] Right now I have a 5 HP, twin cylinder, 220V compressor with a 25 or 30 gallon tank. I still have to stop and let the compressor catch up when I'm doing a lot of grinding, especially since moving to Colorado. The altitude has the same effect on compressors as it does on engines. There just isn't as much air to move! [​IMG]

    <font color=black>HarryH3 - '75 K5</font color=black>
    <a target="_blank" href=http://www.angelfire.com/super/ThunderTruck>www.angelfire.com/super/ThunderTruck</a>
    It's a great day to be alive...
     

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