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what size of rims do I need, questions about lift

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by 85chevy4x4, Apr 26, 2002.

  1. 85chevy4x4

    85chevy4x4 Registered Member

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    I have an 85 chevy 3/4 ton 4x4. I am buying a rough country 6" lift and 315/75/16 bfg mud terrain km tires for my truck. What size of rims should I buy? Do I need 16x8 or 16x10? What is all involved in installing my lift kit? Do I need to lengthen the brake lines? Do I need a steering block? The kit comes with leaf springs for the front, u-bolts, blocks for the rear, shocks, and a steering arm. What else do I need to buy? Are suspension lift kits hard to install? Thanks for the help.
     
  2. ChevBlazin

    ChevBlazin 1/2 ton status

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    You will need a raised steering arm for the front axle (might come with the kit). With the 6" incher you will also need extended brake lines, some kits come with a drop bracket for the lines, not sure if those work good or not. With a 6" lift you will probably have to lengthen the drive shafts also. The hardest part of the install is probably getting the frame high enough off the ground to fit the new springs in, unless you have access to a hiost. Just cut the old u bolts off since you have new ones anyway, makes it go much quicker. A day or two before you might want to put some penetrating oil on the leaf spring bolts and steering arm bolts. Me, my dad, and my grandpa installed my front lift one day, and did the rear blocks teh next afternoon. First time for us and went pretty good.
     
  3. Blazinaire

    Blazinaire 1/2 ton status

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    Fill out your profile, there might be someone in your area that can help you. As for what else you MIGHT need, I have a 6'' lift as well and needed: Dropped pitman arm, longer brake lines, front driveshaft spacer (optional), c/v rear driveshaft (or you can lower your T-case, but the c/v is better). Leaf sprung vehicles are the easiest to install lifts on, it shouldn,t take you any more than 1 day to finish. If you haven't bought your tires yet, I would recomend getting 15'' rims, the tires and rims are cheaper and there are more sizes available. I personally like 10'' wide rims better because they can fit a wider tire if you ever want to go bigger. The 8'' rim will help the tires from rubbing in the wheel well while turning. There is a lot of personal preference involved when purchasing tires and wheels.
     
  4. tacoma972

    tacoma972 1/2 ton status

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    i say get the 10" rims it makes the tires stick out a little wider and provides a little more stability. plus they just look better and like the other guy said, if you go bigger you already have the rims. your tire size is 33x12.50rwhatever. and they will function on either rim though.
     
  5. 85chevy4x4

    85chevy4x4 Registered Member

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    I had someone tell me that 15" rims will not fit on my truck without grinding down the brake drums. Is this true? That is the only reason why I want 16's. The 15" tires and rims are much cheaper. Will I have to trim my fenders with a 6" lift and 35" tires? I just painted it over the weekend and don't want to ruin my pretty yellow paint job. Where is a good place to buy rims online and what are good cheap rims?
     
  6. 70~K5

    70~K5 1/2 ton status

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    Go with the 16"s so you don't have to grind the front calipers. 315/75x16 is the same as 35/ 12.50x16.
     
  7. little79k5

    little79k5 1/2 ton status

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    6" is plenty for 35's, or even 36's with no trimming
     
  8. zakk

    zakk 1/2 ton status

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    PLEASE FILL OUT YOUR PROFILE

    that being said, go with the 16.5's. it will give you more tire choices down the road.

    Also, a bit of fender trimming is in order with that setup, IMO.
    When i had my 35's (not my 36's mind you) i smashed the hell outta my rear driver lip. it also carved up my ProComps really well, too. If you plan on really "gettin' it" do some modest trimming with a cutoff wheel for nice, clean lines.
     
  9. 70~K5

    70~K5 1/2 ton status

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    I'd go with 16"s not 16.5"s 16.5"s have a taper seat bead. When you air them down it's easy to slip a bead off. 16"s seat like a 15" does they have the little ridge on the rim that helps keep the bead seated.
     
  10. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

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    I would go with either the 15s or the 16s. I would NOT use 16.5" rims on a 4x4, especially a lifted one. My friend had a 38x16x16.5 Ground Hawg come off at 25 PSI on his truck...screw that, I want all my tires thank you.

    I have 35x12.50R15 old style BFG Mud Terrains on 15x10 wheels and have no regrets. The caliper grinding is no big deal at all.

    15s are cheaper to buy tires for and you have more tires to choose from. Steel wheels are your only option--nobody makes aluminum 15" 8 lug wheels and they wouldn't fit even if someone did.

    Usually 16" tires are heavier duty load range (good if you tow a trailer) but more expensive, and you have less choices. You can choose from Aluminum or Steel wheels in 16"
     

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