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What to do when slow at work

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by POWERMAD, Jun 5, 2004.

  1. POWERMAD

    POWERMAD 1/2 ton status

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    Take in a set of junk heads and practice porting.
    Amazing how fast it goes when you are not worried about trashin em.
    Too bad they're cracked. /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif they turned out nice.
    All I used was a tapered carbide bit and a small flap wheel I modified so it was tapered.
    I wasn't able to get all the rough spots out of the runners due the length of the bits but the chambers and the short side of the runners look sweet. Not hogged out either, just blended and smoothed out.
    We have a digi cam for warranty work, I'll try and get some pics tomorrow of the before and after work.
    I thought it was pretty cool anyway, the last time I did it I spent a stupid amount of time doing it being oh so careful not to screw it up.
    I went into it this time knowing that if I nicked a seat or went to far it was only practice and was not out anything.
    If it wasn't for the crack I would run em in a heartbeat.
     
  2. mudhog

    mudhog THEGAME Staff Member Super Moderator

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    very cool so when you going to do mine /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  3. POWERMAD

    POWERMAD 1/2 ton status

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    Get an electric die grinder and I'll give ya a cracked head to practice on.
    Lord knows I have seen plenty of em lately.
    I don't know what the electic ones cost but I'll let ya know Monday. /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
    Carbide bits are kinda spendy though, the one I used was $30.
    I have several different ones but they are all short shank ones, the ball one was useful in smoothing out the chamber.
    A porting kit is in the near future.
    Right now I am good to go to smooth out the short side, do a lil chamber work and port match.
    To get all the casting flash and other crap out of the runners will require a long shank bit.
    Good thing I have an account with 4 different tool guys. /forums/images/graemlins/doah.gif
    To anyone paying attention be conservitave, the results are worth the effort.
    Without CCing the runners and the chambers I would have to say that by my calibrated eye they are all very close to the same.
    As stated all I did was smooth everything out.
    Do not remove any material other than required to blend the area.
    Just doing that makes a big difference in the way the head will flow.
     
  4. big83chevy4x4

    big83chevy4x4 3/4 ton status

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    when i did my friends, i gasket matched, smoothed and took away all the high ridges. i also smoothed out where the valve guide goes into the port. never touched the chamber, its big enough. made it all preaty. i would like to see what it flows compared to stock.

    you definately need the carbide bit, i HAD a bit that i used on my aluminum manifold. key word had, lasted about 30 seconds on the cast head /forums/images/graemlins/doah.gif

    how long did it take you. i got about 1 pound of shavings, probably would have been more, but thats what was on the table. it took me 8 hours on a set of heads. porting is fun /forums/images/graemlins/waytogo.gif
     
  5. POWERMAD

    POWERMAD 1/2 ton status

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    10 hr shift at work, I stopped in when I was able here and there and knocked it out.
    The chambers I didn't realy mess with except to smooth em out.
    It went fast realy, I have a new bit and it just sorta flowed LOL
    Once I had the basic shape I just smoothed it out with the flap brush.
    It was an 80 grit and realy if I wanted to make it shiny I would have to hit it again with a finer grit.
    I would have to say that with all the right goodies I could do a simple port job in about 10 hrs. Including the intake.
    Start ccing stuff and all that to get it all balancenced and perfect would take alot longer.
    And would also require a flow bench.
    Which is why I said keep it conservitive.
    Once ya strat messin with the chambers...
    All I did was knock off the high spots and smooth the rough edges.
    And if this is gonna be a plant that ya don't plan on tearing down after every race is all that is needed.
    Be conservitive.
    I remember one guy that brought me in a set of 305 heads to have a valve job done for his straight liner.
    he hogged the intakes out so bad that it cut into the valve cover bolt holes.
    I refused to do the job and he pissed and moaned so bad that I did the deed.
    I wound up setting up another set of heads for him for the next weekend.
    No head work just another 3 angle valve job. LOL
    I sure miss having access to a valve grinder and all the other goodies to rebuild heads.
    It would solve my SBC head crisis LOL
    Kinda blows having a shed full of good SB heads and not being able to do anything with em.
     
  6. boggerless

    boggerless 1 ton status Premium Member

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    cool,bro. thats how it usually works for me. /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif /forums/images/graemlins/k5.gifto /forums/images/graemlins/truck.gif
     
  7. CyberSniper

    CyberSniper 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    [ QUOTE ]

    Carbide bits are kinda spendy though, the one I used was $30.
    I have several different ones but they are all short shank ones, the ball one was useful in smoothing out the chamber.
    A porting kit is in the near future.


    [/ QUOTE ]

    KBC Tools sells tungsten carbide 1/4" shank double-cut burrs for pretty cheap. I think the most expensive one I bought was $13. They have long shank ones as well. They've survived me grinding on all sorts of stuff including shaving my differential cases.

    I don't piss around with the intake runners much. I get rid of the casting flaws. I also square the opening to a set of Fel-pro gaskets.

    99% of the work I do is done through the valve seats. Get rid of the short side radius, blend the seats, widen around the valve guides to 5/16-3/8, minimize/taper the valve guides, and square up the exhaust ports.

    If I have time I get rid of all the sharp edges in the combustion chamber, polish it, and CC the heads. The only thing I polish is the combustion chamber. The rest of it isn't worth the work. Especially since the intake side prefers a bit of roughness. The carbides still leave the surface smoother than stock.
     

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