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Which fuel filter for Q-jet

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by bajaviking, Feb 27, 2003.

  1. bajaviking

    bajaviking 1/2 ton status

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    I have the little paper filter but it seems like it is kind of small and insufficient. I have a steel pipe from the fuel pump to my q-jet, could i just take it of, cut a piece out in the middle and put a performance filter on it with rubber fuel hose and hose clamps? Whats the best solution? /forums/images/graemlins/ears.gif
     
  2. Goober

    Goober 1/2 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    could i just take it of, cut a piece out in the middle and put a performance filter on it with rubber fuel hose and hose clamps?

    [/ QUOTE ]



    Exactly!



    /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  3. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    Actually I believe as designed, the Q-jet fuel filter will raise off its seat and allow the fuel to "bypass" the filter if its clogged. (thats what the spring and rubber seal are for) GM thought it worked well enough to use from 1965-1990.

    I'm NOT a fan of cutting the steel line, although it is commonly done. (a lot of people on here talk about reducing variables that could leave you stranded, hose clamps and rubber line on the fuel system are two things that can leave you stranded)

    Unless you are racing the thing, leave it as is, there is nothing to be gained from removing it unless your engine is starving for fuel at high speed.

    These are my opinions, in none of my vehicles has the stock fuel filter been the cause of driveability issues.
     
  4. wrathORC

    wrathORC 1/2 ton status

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    I don't know if I'd cut the line. Especially since my old fuel line used to snake around the block. It'd suck to have the rubber hose spring a leak and have fuel splattered all over the place. Gas boils at around 150° so it wouldn't take much to make it go "boom".

    I take it you have the short filter? Some company used to sell an adapter so you could run the long one but I don't remember who. Maybe Summit would know?

    I run the short one and I run an aftermarket see-through one with the nylon element (yeah, the one you can buy at the parts store for $10) before my fuel pump. I run an electric pump though.

    I'd just leave it alone and just keep it replaced.
     
  5. Thunder

    Thunder 3/4 ton status

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    Yeah to what Dorian says. I always just used the stock filter on all my q-jets without any problems.
    Never saw any reason to hack up a good fuel line to put in an inline one.
    I always changed the filter at every tune up.
     
  6. bajaviking

    bajaviking 1/2 ton status

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    Thanks for the advice. Considering how cheap and easy it is to change I guess I will just leave it like it is.
     
  7. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    The Buick/Olds/Pontiac fitting might thread on, but not sure if it would clear everything.

    It's an idea, they use a longer filter element from what I've seen.

    As to the original poster, USE A TUBING WRENCH and the right size open end (1" I think) to hold the filter housing "nut" and use the tubing wrench on the fuel line itself. Make sure the fuel line doesn't twist at the first bend as you try to loosen it. If the fuel line twists with the fitting on the end of the line, stop.

    I usually hold the open end in place, put the tubing wrench in position, and give it a sharp hit with my palm, hopefully breaking the bond between the fuel line fitting and the fuel line itself.
     

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