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which is better? tie rod ends, or hyme joints

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by purple76pearl, Sep 15, 2003.

  1. purple76pearl

    purple76pearl 1/2 ton status

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    i forgot this on my post, so ill make a new one
    on my drag link for cross over, im thinking if i run tie rod ends instead of my hyme joints, it wont bind as much? with a honest opinion which is better and why?
     
  2. Bubba Ray Boudreaux

    Bubba Ray Boudreaux 1 ton status

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    You run mud, right?
     
  3. purple76pearl

    purple76pearl 1/2 ton status

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    not alot, but yea sometimes i have been known to hit a whole or 4
     
  4. BorregoK5

    BorregoK5 1/2 ton status

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    I've been running TRE's on my crossover and I'm still eating them even with good alignment at the mount. From what I've seen, 35" tires and smaller can do really good with TRE's but 36" tires and up might be better suited toward heims. And if your smart, you'll double shear each end for maximum strength if you go heims. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  5. purple76pearl

    purple76pearl 1/2 ton status

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    what do you mean double shear?
     
  6. BorregoK5

    BorregoK5 1/2 ton status

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    Double shear braces the mount on each side of the heim (like the front shocks to the frame), single shear is when only one side of the mount is braced(much like the factory rear shock mounts with the single bolt holding the shock on). I'm making myself a 4wd Pitman arm with a double shear heim mount now that I'm giving up on TRE's all together. I already have a crossover arm which I may modify over to double shear as well.
     
  7. ntsqd

    ntsqd 1/2 ton status

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    Mud is the last place I'd run any sort of SRE. They have ZERO dirt/mud sealing and no way to flush out the junk like you can with the grease zert on a TRE. Go with bigger TRE's if you're killing the size you've got.
     
  8. willyswanter

    willyswanter 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    Not to mention heims don't last at all on the street...
     
  9. jekbrown

    jekbrown I am CK5 Premium Member GMOTM Winner Author

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    [ QUOTE ]
    Not to mention heims don't last at all on the street...

    [/ QUOTE ]

    why not? bet the 1.25" heims on whiteknight could handle the rigors of asphault. /forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

    j
     
  10. Butch

    Butch 1/2 ton status

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    Hiems have no way to lube them and if you run them on the street you will be lucky if they last 8 months without having to be replaced. TRE's work the best if they are kept in their operating range. Just use good quality ends, like Moog ends. Dont buy the cheapest thing made and you will be happy. I ran hiems for 1 year with 38's on a trail only rig and after that went back to TRE's. To me they are far superior in our applications
     
  11. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    I've seen heims with zerk fittings.....the Aurora Bearing catalog is full of them. They also sell grease-seals that fit over the rotating ball areas to help keep the dirt out and the grease IN. I'm sure it would be a lot better for their life expectancy....

    /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
     
  12. tch777

    tch777 1/2 ton status

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    Check out this set up. Bulletproof They are "lubed" by a teflon carbon fiber insert inside the joint. You can also find similar joints from National Rod ends. Just do a search on the Web for National Rod ends. The setup above is going on the Sub when the current stuff dies.

    Tim
     
  13. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Not sure I'm blown away by the specs on the BulletProof site for their rod ends.....their "top of the line" end is only rated at 28,000 Lbs radial load. /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif

    The Aurora stuff I've seen goes up to 55,000 Lbs which depending on the application (link suspension on a heavy truck, for example) could be a more appropriate strength to use......

    It's important to remind ourselves that designing suspensions or steering systems at this level (spec'ing rod ends, and such) does require a detailed understanding of what loads are present in those parts...... nobody will stop you from building a dangerous (or deadly) solution for your vehicle.

    /forums/images/graemlins/thinking.gif
     
  14. purple76pearl

    purple76pearl 1/2 ton status

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    ya know, while im looking at bullet proof steering, im noticing its a good clean look, looks strong and all, but
    their is no passenger steering arm, no flat top knucle, its just drag link to drag link
    thats kinda the cheap way of doing cross over steering, has anyone tried that
    and if so does it work?
    maybe im just looking at it wrong, but sure seems like you wouldn't need any machining, or passenger arm
    could be a cheap rout if its strong /forums/images/graemlins/ears.gif
     
  15. ntsqd

    ntsqd 1/2 ton status

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    Notice where the zerks are. Typically they are in the shoulder just off of the threads. That is the single worst place you could put them. The tension loads in the SRE are the highest there. Very common to see those fail right thru the zerk hole. Not to mention that those SRE's that come with the zerks tend to be the low end parts.
    The only reasonable place to put a zerk in an SRE would be in the end of the threads.

    True, there are the Seals-It washers. They can only do so much and it's not as good as the sealing/flushing you get out of the box with a TRE.
     
  16. tch777

    tch777 1/2 ton status

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    Just curious how does the 28,000 lbs radial load compare to tie rod ends? It is good to know there are stronger joints but are they really needed?

    Tim
     
  17. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    [ QUOTE ]
    Just curious how does the 28,000 lbs radial load compare to tie rod ends? It is good to know there are stronger joints but are they really needed?

    Tim

    [/ QUOTE ]


    I have some formulas for calculating suspension loads (for rod ends) and depending on how the links are setup (especially vertical seperation between links) the loads can go up in a hurry!!! I have designs where link loads are as low as 22,000 Lbs and some where the links are loaded over 60,000 Lbs!!.....all from making relatively minor design changes.

    The point I will repeat again, is that you are talking about parts for a STEERING system. Any component failures can be fatal... this is not an area where a "guess" is an acceptable sizing method.



    As a side note, I noticed some of the setups on that website were single-shear connections (parts only anchored on one side)....in a custom steering system, I'd be trying to do as many of the connections in double-shear as I could..... /forums/images/graemlins/thinking.gif
     
  18. FRIZZLEFRY

    FRIZZLEFRY 1/2 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    ...which is better and why?

    [/ QUOTE ]

    To me TREs would be the way to go.Because just about every parts store in the US is gonna have what you need if you should break one.You might be hard pressed to find a heim in a time of dire need /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     

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