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Who else makes greasable bushings?

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by **DONOTDELETE**, Sep 18, 2002.

    I'm looking at purchasing front and rear greasable spring bushings and was wondering who makes them. I know that ORD does but considering the problem they've been having (no offense Stephen, just being a picky consumer /forums/images/icons/blush.gif ) I would just like to know what other alternatives are out there so I can explore my options. I would prefer to support the supporters of CK5 but now my confidence has been crushed /forums/images/icons/frown.gif

    BTW: Stephen, what's the update on the problem? When is the new design going to be available?
     
  1. thatK30guy

    thatK30guy 1 ton status Premium Member

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    It's not ORD's fault. Daystar, the urethane manufacturer, is to blame for this problem.

    Other than Daystar, I have no clue whom else makes these bushings.
     
  2. fourwheelerjeff

    fourwheelerjeff 1/2 ton status Staff Member Moderator

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    energy suspension and prothane also make bushings, although i couldn't tell you if they have greasable bushings or not
     
  3. ramjet gmc

    ramjet gmc CK5 Staff Staff Member Moderator GMOTM Winner

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    call Stephen he will sell you the bolts or kit and you can find your own bushings ORD is good like that and as you see they are doing the right by CK5 and the bushings thing /forums/images/icons/grin.gif
     
  4. Blue85

    Blue85 Troll Premium Member

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    You could make your own. Drilling half way down a grade 8 bolt isn't easy, though. Then just drill a side hole in the bolt, put a hole in the sleeve and slot the insides of the bushings (I'm not sure how you do that, though, heated wire?) Then tap the hole in the bolt head and screw in a grease zerk.

    Just an idea.
     
  5. BorregoK5

    BorregoK5 1/2 ton status

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    Thats exactly how I made mine.
     
  6. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    Kind of curious here, but what disadvantage is there to the rubber stock bushings? Poly is pretty well despised in suspension setups (it binds, which is why they make greasable poly setups obviously) and rubber is softer and thus absorbs more shock, so why go with poly? I know for body mounts, poly is cheaper than stock rubber ones, same thing with suspension pieces? (before you go misinterpreting what I'm saying, rubber and poly are both poor choices when you want the suspension as a whole to work right in a car when driven hard, but trucks are a different animal)

    I don't wheel hard, so if you guys are running into problems with the rubber stuff from "abuse" then I would understand, just that I've got some bushings on my truck that are probably 25 years old and still working ok. Not optimal I'm sure, but they haven't fallen out yet : )

    Just curious!
     
  7. m j

    m j 1/2 ton status

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    rubber is a poor choice in any application that will see petrochemicals.
    oil turns it to jello while eating it, poly is impervious to that but is heat sensitive.
    for street cars poly is still an upgrade over rubber.
     
  8. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    I'd say poly is just as bad as rubber in a street car. Binding is not an upgrade, and rubber doesn't, it just deflects more. (lesser of two evils is...?) When you can push on the rear of a 4 link car equipped with poly bushings, and have the settled height change AND stay 1" different each time you push, you have a problem, and thats what poly does. If you can grease it, great, problem probably solved, until the grease goes away. If I'm going to grease something, it had better be worth it, and something like del-a-lums are worth it, not poly.

    As to petrochemicals, how many bushings on the trucks get a dousing of oil often enough to cause problems? The tranny/t-case and motor mounts of course do, but spring bushings? When?

    As I said, I've got 25 year old bushings (and my '83 was all stock too) and even though both trucks leak(ed) oil like sieves, there was/has never been any problem with the bushings due to oils. Most bushing wear most of us see, I'd bet is due to age and dry rot, NOT oil contamination. (except engine and tranny) 25 years or more (friends '73 comes to mind also) of rubber working fine is not bad if you ask me.
     
  9. m j

    m j 1/2 ton status

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    I am going with the bushings are not the problem if your suspension binds, but like you my car is getting all solid bushings.

    for a spring shackle I am still curious why no one has made shackles from hiems and short tubing, must be the prohibitive cost.
     
  10. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    4 link stock rear suspension/axle in an 80's Monte Carlo, poly bushings. Nothing wrong with GM's suspension geometry to cause problems while sitting flat.

    If nothing but the bushings were changed, and the problem occurred immediately after the change over, what else would you attribute it to?

    Even if you *could* attribute the varying ride height to something else, why would they be greasable (and squeak) if there wasn't a problem with binding? Even the poly-graphite ones squeak.

    Its a great material for sway bar end links, body mounts, and engine/tranny mounts, but for everything else on a vehicle, stiff rubber or something like the del-a-lums is what I'd choose.
     
  11. m j

    m j 1/2 ton status

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    that is a triangulated upper arm setup?
    del alums will not work properly on that as the design requires bushing or some other deflection to roll, unless you really want to see bind.
    the 5.0 crowd was always being sold on 88 durometer bushings, is that similar to you GMers?
    sounds to me like there is a problem with the bushing design, though I think the same is true of the shackle bushings we are sold for our trucks.
    where does the design account for movement? when you have to press the bushing and sleeve together you know they arent going to move to freely.
     
  12. jmd

    jmd Registered Member

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    <font color="purple"> Del-a-lums work great in a pivot location - on a-arms they are the best you can do really if you want handling &amp; streetable.

    As far as leaf springs, Global West does sell first gen f-body leaf bushings done in del-a-lum. If the spring bushings in a leaf setup were done in D.A.L., and they had no bind, nor any deflection, would this limit flex of the suspension when your leftie is high and your rightie is low? Or is all that action taken care of by flex of the spring? I'm a lot more into street car chassis than off-road chassis, hence my question.

    Matthew /forums/images/icons/laugh.gif </font color>
     
  13. m j

    m j 1/2 ton status

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    as you alluded to, they work great if you want only one direction of movement.
    in the rear suspension this is not the case in any car that I can think of other then IRS
     
  14. m j

    m j 1/2 ton status

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    IMO the movement should/could be made to occur between the 'bolt' and sleeve.
    the sleeve should have grease channels and the sleeve material may have to be sacrificial/softer then the 'bolt' and definitely thicker then the rolled sheet metal that is found in some bushings( usually to allow the same bushing to accomodate 2 size through bolts)

    that or the shackle should carry the movement with hiems or ???
     
  15. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    In the rear locations on the triangular, if I've got my theory straight, poly is fine for the upper arms, you want rubber (albeit stiff) for the lowers.

    Examples on DAL's (del-a-lums) are just for comparison purposes....if you are going to grease something, why not something that actually works right? (and this is for cars, as you mention, the travel has to be accounted for somewhere with leafs)

    Again with the binding issue, if poly binds more than rubber, and you DON'T want bind at the leaf spring shackles, why poly and why not rubber?

    Movement is taken care of by rubber because it deflects and twists...poly just grabs and squeaks /forums/images/icons/smile.gif
     
  16. BorregoK5

    BorregoK5 1/2 ton status

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    The biggest reason for poly over rubber is that most rubber pieces allow for more squish due to their soft compound, which can lead to misalignment in your suspension geometry (at least stock) I assume that if you designed a suspension with that in mind, you could account for it to some degree. But poly, while it does bind sooner, also keeps the geometry of the suspension at closer tollerance under stress.

    In trucks, the rubber seems to work well and the geometry change is rather negligable due to its location in the suspension.
     
  17. m j

    m j 1/2 ton status

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    poly can be made as soft as you want IIRC
     
  18. BorregoK5

    BorregoK5 1/2 ton status

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    But then you run into problems like the Daystars.

    Consequently, I just cut a deal with a local poly manufacturer to buy custom poly bushings of all shapes and sizes as well as firmness. Best of all, they are tried and true with the desert racing industry so quality has already been addressed. I can finally begin production on a slew of cool new stuff I've been working on where the bushing were jacking the final price too high to sell.

    I'll still use rubber bushings in the front leaf spring at the rear frame shackle mount though. They just work better there.
     
  19. Blue85

    Blue85 Troll Premium Member

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    Remember that the poly bushings we put in our spring eyes are a whole different design than the rubber ones they are replacing. The poly relies and sliding for movement, the rubber uses flexing. The rubber bushing is vulcanized to the inner sleeve and the outer sleeve. After the outer sleeve is pressed into the spring eye and the bolt is tightened, the only movement comes from the twisting of the rubber. That's what limits the overall travel of a rubber bushing, not a "lack of lubrication". They are like springs by themselves, so the further they are turned, the more they resist further movement. The poly bushings on the other hand can not give good movement unless they are lubed, but once they are, they move equally well no matter how many degrees they have already turned to.

    Of course, the other difference is that they are different materials.
     

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