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winter driving tips?

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by bigbadchev84, Dec 1, 2005.

  1. bigbadchev84

    bigbadchev84 1/2 ton status

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    i have moved recently 40 miles away from my job and today was the first snowfall, i have a 2005 tacoma 4wd with stock tires.......the strech of highway i have to travel is now to be bad during the winter.....icy and really snowy....anyone have some good tips to keep safeand prepared? what kind of a roadside kit should i put together? before i only had to drive 10 miles each way to work and the roads were never really that bad. thanks everyone
     
  2. TSGB

    TSGB 1 ton status

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    Heh heh, we got snow today too! I've been dancing a little dance since it started! :saweet:
     
  3. Seventy4Blazer

    Seventy4Blazer 3/4 ton status

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    i live in a some what nice area... although to cold for me this time of year....

    i do know when it does rain once in a while... I CAN NOT use my exhaust brake while its wet....
    Grant
     
  4. Jagged

    Jagged 1 ton status

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    blankets, flares, shovel, cat litter, flashlight/wand, gloves

    a candle -- in extreme situations, a lit candle can keep a vehicles interior sufficiently heated. You'd be suprised how much heat one candle can provide.

    and on that note, a lighter/waterproof matches



    Driving a standard? If so a good tip for ice - try starting in 2nd or 3rd gear, reduces the amount of torque to the wheels and helps prevent spinning your wheels
     
  5. Drey

    Drey 3/4 ton status

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    Im my 96 blazer I carry, a healthy supplied toolbox(which also adds weight to the rear end in the area of 40 I think) A tow strap or log chain, clevace, ice scraper of course, couple pairs of gloves, couple pairs of socks, always have at least on coat in it, and im typically wearing a sweatshirt and a coat anyway. Blanket, a scoop shovel. Buck 110 Knife and finally 160 lbs worth of bagged sand(for weight or worse case sceraio added traction).

    Driving tips I can tell ya take it nice and easy accelerating, give yourself more room then you think you will need for brakeing. And dont be in a hurry.
     
  6. Can Can

    Can Can Pusher Man Staff Member Super Moderator

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    VERY IMPORTANT!!!! Stay away from the little berm of snow and slush pushed onto the shoulder by the plows. If you get sucked into it, you WILL end up in the ditch.
     
  7. Cricket

    Cricket 3/4 ton status

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    Cell Phone if you use them. Keep some good boots, extra gloves, long underwear, and wool blend socks stored in there somewhere.

    Just imagine the worst case and what you'd need to do to walk out of it alone, or stay put for several days.

    What would you need.
     
  8. 89GMCSuburban

    89GMCSuburban 1/2 ton status

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    No one has said this yet...GO SLOW....that is all. :haha:
     
  9. 84gmcjimmy

    84gmcjimmy 1 ton status

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    Get proper snow tires. That should keep you out of trouble if you drive with care.
     
  10. Fubeca

    Fubeca 1/2 ton status

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    Take this one to heart - go as slow as you need too. And always leave plenty of room.

    I see stupid people here all the time overdriving the conditions. Four wheel drive helps you go fast but doesn't usually slow you down any faster.

    Tuesday I saw a BMW spin out into the median wall - going too fast with hardly any snow on the road at all.

    I love the snow - I don't even need to go skiing I have enough fun just driving around everytime it snows. My wife thinks I'm nuts 'cause I have to go out and drive everytime it snows!:haha:


    I suggest going out and playing a lot in the snow - get to know how your vehicle will react - then you've got a better chance when the real thing comes up.


    Oh - and to answer your question, I always throw a little sleeping bag in the back, and a little bag with some food (granola bars, whatever). I try to keep cold weather clothes in the car even if I'm just going somewhere quickly. I drive 45 miles one-way into the city each day.
     
  11. CustomChevy

    CustomChevy 1/2 ton status

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    advice from a canadian on winter driving.


    DONT BE AN IDIOT! DRIVE FOR THE CONDITIONS.


    no need to race your way into the ditch.
     
  12. B_to_C

    B_to_C 1/2 ton status Author

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    I do this too! :haha:
     
  13. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    all of the above!.and then some!..BRING EVERYTHING!

    Some good advice given here..I won't venture out if its snowing without jumper cables,and a shovel in case I get stuck in a snowbank-and TOOLS! :doah: -remember--even experienced drivers end up in a ditch sooner or later..extra gas in a can in the bed of your truck too,in case you get stuck in traffic jams due to accidents..(happens a lot here!).. :doah:

    (I don't care HOW careful YOU are,how slow you go,or how you drive--if its anything like here where you live,some other impatient a$$hole will probably slam into you,because they are clueless as to how to drive in snow or ice,and were probably over confident their 4wd SUV yuppiemobile will stop as fast as it will go in 4WD!)..so be prepared for a rear ending,ot worse,a T boning!..only good thing about drivers with cell phones is they can call 911 faster.. :mad: ) :doah: I wish I had an exoskeleton cage here during snowstorms!..

    Another thing I'd add to the list,having survived more than a few blizzards with 60+ mph winds,is a good blanket or sleeping bag-or at least a heavy winter jacket!..it could be a lifesaver.(those "space blankets" are cheap at Wal-Mart,and fold up into a shirt pocket--look like aluminum foil,but they work,and wont soak up water like a sponge--even a large Hefty trash bag will keep you alive by retaining body heat if you get stranded!--

    And bring some FOOD!..doesn't have to be fancy--a big jar of peanut butter,crackers,anything that wont spoil before you use it --(you'd be suprised how long stuff stays edible in a car trunk or glove box in New England during the winter!--in fact,I've had to THAW out stuff before I could eat it! :p: )..without that blanket or sleeping bag,YOU might end up frozen stiff!..we had people living in cars for almost a week in 1978,when the highways got buried with 18+" in less than half a day..we got 38" in 2 days that time... :eek1: had quite a few since almost as bad,maybe worse!

    I'd bring a set of tire chains too,at least enough for the rear wheels..a bag of sand or cat litter in your trunk,fill up the bed of your truck with sand if you want better traction and braking--real easy to spin around with an empty bed on ice or snow in a pickup--especially if a heavy plow is up front!..-I used to think 4WD alone was sufficient,until 1978,when our famous"Blizzard Of 78" came along..I put chains on my 2wd 56 Chevy pickup,and filled the bed with gravel--I barely made the 15 mile ride home--got 16" of snow in a few hours! :eek1:

    I had chains on all 4 wheels on my 4x4's I owned a few times since!--when snow gets over 2' deep,and is like wet concrete,even 4wd isn't enough alone!--it just wont push it unless the bed is loaded,and chains are on all 4 tires!..chains make you feel invincible!--I've had snow coming over my hood ,while passing all the buried cars in front of me that were hopelessly stuck!..like having a bulldozer with tracks!--and they let you STOP as well as go too!.. :D

    I'm not sure a candle is a good idea,or how effective it would be heating up an interior if the wind is howling like it usually does during snowstorms here--couldn't hurt I guess..I bring a small propane camping heater that screws on the bottle,looks like a sunflower..even that thing isn't much more than a handwarmer..gloves,good boots,a knife,and whatever else you can think of..you can never be TOO prepared!.. ;)
     
  14. Z3PR

    Z3PR Banned

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    Best winter driving tip I can give you is too slow down. Give yourself extra time too get where you're going. Speed limit means nothing on ice. Take it slow and easy.
     
  15. mikey_d05

    mikey_d05 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    I think the biggest thing I can think of that has sort of been mentioned already is that if it's just plain unsafe, call in to work. I was born and raised around snow and know how to drive in bad weather, but as young and dumb as I am there are situations and weather circumstances that are just plain unsafe for anyone to be venturing out in.

    You would lose a lot less pay taking a sick day than it would cost to repair your vehicle after even a minor accident.
     
  16. Resurrection_Joe

    Resurrection_Joe 1 ton status

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    Stay off your damn brakes
     
  17. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    yup--get "anal gloucoma" !!

    Yes,if conditions are that bad,like they were here several times,just call in and say "I've got "Anal Gloucoma",when they ask what's that,you say "I cant see my a$$ coming to work today"!... :haha: :haha: --I'd much rather lose a days pay (or my job,if they feel that strongly about my absence)--than my truck,or to get hurt,killed,or do the same to someone else..

    And yeah,forget about the brake pedal..it'll only go FASTER with the wheels locked,and usually straight into a ditch,snowbank,tree,pole,or worse,another vehicle! :eek1: :( ..easy on the throttle too!..sudden acceleration only makes you go sideways,not forward!..

    Plenty of washer fluid and a pump that works is a must here too..so much salt it dries on the windsheild like white paint...I find propping the rear of the hood up a bit with small blocks of wood helps a lot to keep it defrosted,it lets hot underhood air blow on the windsheild..remember to wipe off the salt from headlights and tailights often too...de-icer spray is nice to have if the locks freeze up..another good use for the propane heater!... :crazy:
     
  18. Russell

    Russell LB7 Tahoe Status Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    The absolute most important thing you can do is journey management. Tell someone who you know will not let you down know where you are going, how you are getting there, and when you expect to arrive. Stick to your plan, follow that route. That way, if something does happen, and you are an hour or two late of your ETA, they'll know where to come looking for you.

    That said, make sure you take it easy, no need to be driving like you are in nascar on icy roads. Give yourself three times as much space to stop as you accelerate. If you are braking, and feel your wheels lock up, immediately throw your truck into neutral, then do threshold braking. Threshold braking is basically pushing the pedal down till the wheels lock up, then letting go, and doing it again. The more time you spend sliding, the further your braking distance. Another reason why to give yourself three times the stopping distance.

    Another trick, esspecially with city driving is to leave 3 - 4 trucklengths between you and the vehicle infront of you when you come to a red light or stop sign, and as soon as you are stopped, start watching your rearview mirror. If you see someone coming in too fast, you can then give them another 3 - 4 trucklengths of space to stop before you get hit. Always make sure that you have enough space between you and the vehicle in front of you, that if you do get hit from behind you won't slide into the person infront of you.

    Have fun on empty roads! Send the rear end whippin' around a corner, go do doughnuts in the church parking lot or something. That kind of goofing off teaches you how to control your vehicle in the event that you need to. I play around all the time with my truck, and becuase of that, I know exactly what it takes to correct if I do loose the rear end.

    I remember last year, I was running a set of pizza slicer summer tires on my 80 the whole winter. I was crusing down the highway when I hit a patch of black ice. It was slippery enough that while I was having no traction issues for the past 20 miles or so, my rear end suddenly flew out on that ice. Fortunately, I knew my truck well enough that I was able to recover from being nearly perpendicular to the road, and not exit my lane. It gave me a heck of a scare, but I was able to keep her in one peice. Whole time I was worried that I was gonna hit the ditch sideways and roll her while going 60 mph! That woulda SUCKED!

    Last thing -- When towing people out, make sure you don't break their vehicle :D

    I learned that the hard way last year! I came across some old dude in his jeep stuck up to the mirrors in the ditch facing backwards, lol

    I whipped out the tow rope, and wound up bending his front control arm while I was yarding on him :doah:

    The guy wasn't too happy to say the least, but was kind enough not to charge me, since it was an accident, lol Make sure that you hook up to something that isn't gonna bend or rip off, and make sure that you stick some kind of a coat or something as a weight so that if the rope breaks, it isn't gonna go through someone's windsheild or something.
     
  19. K5Steve

    K5Steve 1/2 ton status

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    I always carry a tow strap,just in case.I've come up on people that have been in a ditch or in a burm and need the help to get out so it pays off.I also carry tools,glow sticks and my cell phone,I'm thinking about a cb too.Allow more time for travel,be causious,even though you're driving safe,there's always some tool that thinks he's invincible in his Xterra.We just got about a foot of snow up here in Tahoe and I'm always amazed at how stupid some people are.I saw a rear wheel drive car with chains on the front :doah: I always see people with cables and NO tensioners!I always ask them,whats keeping them from wrapping around your axle?Buy them.
     
  20. Russell

    Russell LB7 Tahoe Status Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    haha, I'd kill myself laughing about the car with the chains up front :haha:

    Its been snowing up here pretty good the past few days, and I'm amazed at some people... Tons of people in the ditch, and a lot of rear endings happening. Even people getting stuck in the middle of the back roads cause they were pushing the skinny pedal down too far trying to accelerate, lol

    Then there is me, I'm driving my 89 half ton. Extended cab longbox truck, so the rear is very light which = little traction. I've got bald 27 x 10" tires on my truck (I affectionately call them my racing slicks, lol), open rear diff and a fairly powerful engine. I haven't had any problems with getting stuck, whipping the rear end around or anything, even in the deep stuff on roads that no one has been down recently. :dunno:
     

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