Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

wiring 220 into my garage?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Thumper, Dec 18, 2004.

  1. Thumper

    Thumper 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    1,582
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Alberta Canada
    I need to add a 220 cct into my garage. Is there any guides online to show a guy how to do it yourself? Ive been told by a home inspector that the panel will handle it, and that its easy to do but I need a bit more guidance.
    They tell me I need to buy two breakers to add to the box, and some wire.... ya, lotsa help they are. How do you hook in the breakers? Is there a wire diagram I can follow? I am an aircraft electrician, but Ive never done any house wiring since school 22 yrs ago!
    Thanks
    Mike
     
  2. camiswelding

    camiswelding 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    May 25, 2003
    Posts:
    2,545
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Redding, CA
    mike...
    go to home depot and buy their book on electrical wiring and buy "Uglys Electrical references"
    between these two you can wire anything

    I built a house and shop ...ran wiring from the pole underground ..did multiple panels.. designed for solar and heavy electric...
    they all passed with flying colors...
    I had never done it before... so you can do it...

    cam

    wiring one or two circuits for 220 welders/air comp should not be daunting...
    your building code might require a permit... I wouldnt get one and would disclose same upon home sale... local govt already gets enough of your money
     
  3. kevcarr59

    kevcarr59 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Posts:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    220 Wiring..

    mike

    Like the others have said it's pretty easy... Just a few little hints that people don't tell you... If the panel is in the building your wiring, that's fine ...if not you may want to use conduit.. size it next size larger than you think you need... it's a lot easier to pull wire through the larger size..

    What kind of amperage are you going to need...how long a distance to plug... When you size the wire, go one size up for safety...also less voltage drop... difference in price a few cents a foot...Also think about a separate 120 volt line to maybe add some extra plugs in the garage at the same time... Now would be the time to do it..

    Black and Decker has a real good book called "The Complete Guide to Home Wiring" that is EXCELLENT. It shows general concepts and specific problems and how to do a SAFE wiring job. I'm a truck driver myself but have been around construction for 25 years.. I've rewired 2 houses and garages and have never had a problem... Did a kitchen remodel this spring and added a second kitchen circuit and some dedicated appliance plugs and all worked out great..

    If you have any questions, feel free to write a note and I'll be glad to help you out. If you need help making a material list, I gladly set you up with what you'll need..

    Kevin
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2004
  4. justhorsinaround

    justhorsinaround 3/4 ton status

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2003
    Posts:
    6,798
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Northerish Phoenix, Az
    On your question of the breakers, it all depends on what kind of panel you have. Some breakers snap in some push in and are held in place with a screw on the outboard side of the breaker itself. Pop off the "safety" panel which covers up the wire but leaves the breaker flippy part exposed and take a peek. Other than that, the other suggestions that were offered should send you down the path of completion.:thumb:
     
  5. 4xcrazy

    4xcrazy 3/4 ton status

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2003
    Posts:
    9,472
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Olympia/Lacey, Washington
    Alittle more simple hepl, basically all 220 volt is, are 4 wires, 2-110 volt, 1 ground, 1 neutral. I had to run a 220 line for my clothes dryer, not hard to do, just don't touch the main lines coming into the breaker box,,,,it WILL hurt.
     
  6. justhorsinaround

    justhorsinaround 3/4 ton status

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2003
    Posts:
    6,798
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Northerish Phoenix, Az
    It'll only hurt for a little while. Been bit plenty of times. I haven't suffered


















    uh suffered
























    uh suffered
























    suffered any.

    :p:

    By the way, don't touch the wires it does get your attention quickly.
     
  7. 4xcrazy

    4xcrazy 3/4 ton status

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2003
    Posts:
    9,472
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Olympia/Lacey, Washington
    Yeah, i was hit a few times, once with a 480v HO ballast, that hurt for several hours,,, but sttttttiiillll nnnnottthing wwwrrrrrong wwwwwwith me eiiiitherrrrrr.

    I know the electric shock didn't do anything to you, thats just the way you are,,,
     
  8. metalbonde

    metalbonde Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2003
    Posts:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sweden
    so your talking three phase ? only 220V...? over here we have 400v..
     
  9. u2slow

    u2slow 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    May 9, 2001
    Posts:
    2,217
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    BC Canada
    Get this book... it's Canadian, with Alberta specifics:

    http://www.psknight.com/alberta_book_1.htm

    A 2-pole breaker is considered better than two singles with a tie-bar... some local bulletins make it madatory.

    Most 240V welders and motors don't need the neutral. Electric dryers need it because they contain a 120V motor and a 240V heater.

    Please tell use what the plug will be supplying, how many amps its rated at, and how far from the main panel it is. (Brand of main panel will help too ;) )
     
  10. Thumper

    Thumper 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    1,582
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Alberta Canada
    Well, what I need is a plug in for a MIG welder, and also a plasma cutter. Maybe eventually down the road a compressor. None of these are mine, but I need some welding done on the hybrid project and since my truck wont fit into his garage, he wants to bring the welder out here. Also, I have been offered the use of a plasma cutter if I need it, and its 220.
    I have no idea what amperage they draw... the welder is a pretty good unit, with gas and the whole bit so...
    The panel is a Stablock, with the main breakers (two tied together) 100A each. There are also 8 other breakers in it all are 15A but one thats 20A for the outside plug. there are lots of empty spaces for more breakers.
    The main 220 plug will prolly be around 25' from the panel... I may have to build an extension cord of 10-20' for movement around the shop. (nice garage huh? :) )
    Any info or instructions would be great!
    Thanks for the answers so far.
    Mike
     
  11. u2slow

    u2slow 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    May 9, 2001
    Posts:
    2,217
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    BC Canada
    Most 240V welders use a 3-prong 50A plug requiring a 6-50r receptacle. You can cover yourself for all cases by using #6 wire and a 50A 2-pole breaker. Of course, if you know the machine draws less than 50A, you could go with smaller wire and matching breaker. (My Century 160 MIG only pulls 20A max but still has a 50A plug.)

    You can put the wires in conduit or use a cable. For exposed locations, it needs to be armoured cable, like BX or TECK. NMD (loomex) would need to be inside a wall.

    Compressor should have its own circuit. I don't know what compressor you have in mind. They will be marked with their ratings, and the circuit should be sized accordingly.
     
  12. kevcarr59

    kevcarr59 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Posts:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Garage Wiring..

    Mike

    Looks like the panel is ok for service size. 200 amp.. I'm guessing the house also runs off this panel..You said 6 or 7 circuits. I don't think you'll be using the plasma cutter and the welder at the same time so 1 240 volt circuit should be enough. Haven't heard of Stablock,may be Canadian, ehh.. haha Most breakers have a litle tab that hooks under a similiar hook on the panel board. Pull your wire through to the board and just wire it into the breaker, making sure the breaker is turned off. Leave about 2 feet extra on the panel board end. The front of the breaker has 2 little contacts the go over the service bar that feed the power. Hook the back hooks in the panel board and then just rock the front down onto the bus bar and it should just slip right in. Just be careful and you wont get zapped.

    One more question.. Is the garage finished (drywalled) or is it open studs? Unfinished of course would be the easiest to work with. Just drill the holes through the stud to box location for plug and be done. 25 feet should be no problem for voltage drop so #6 wire should be ok for 50 amp line. You also said you might need to make an extension cord. With wiring that heavy its not really recommended becuase rolling/unrolling will weaken the conductors in the cable. You may want to put in a second plug on the other side or end of the garage.

    Planning for a air compressor can be a challenge. They can be either 120 or 240. I've got a little Coleman Black Max 20 gallon 5 horse 120 volt that's on wheels. It puts out 155 psi at the tank and runs my 1/2" impact no problem. It's decent for what I need and its portable. It should be on a dedicated line but I have enough plugs in the garage. I think above 20 gallon tank size, most are going to be 240 volt. That size is going to be some serious bucks for a compressor just for a weekend mechanic. A big compressor (60-80 gallon tank) doesn't move and will have to be set in an out of the way spot. Then you may have to run pipe for air supply lines..

    I know this may sound a little elaborate but I did this project last year myself. I've got a separate 24'X24' steel garage and a double-car size workshop that I powered off a second power pole on the property. It was hooked into the service box for the house. Split the workshop off the house and ran a panel board for the garage and workshop from the second pole. The most expensive thing was the wire from the pole to the garage 75 feet.

    Let me know if I can be of any help

    Kevin
     
  13. azblazer69

    azblazer69 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2004
    Posts:
    30
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    Kevin has it together... The only thing I'd like to add is make sure the breaker is rated for fewer amps than any other piece of your work... If your welder, or plasma cutter is rated for 50 amps than overbuild everything but your breaker... Its better to have your breaker trip than burn up your welder...
     

Share This Page