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Would you trust a repaired frame?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by nvrenuf, May 22, 2002.

  1. nvrenuf

    nvrenuf NONE shall pass! Premium Member

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    Mobile, Al.
    Situation: a typical K5 with the usual cracks behind the steering box. During a 4 wheeling trip the frame buckles slightly behind the steering box. While standing in front of the truck the left frame rail droops about 2" lower than the right.

    If this is straightened PROFESSIONALLY and both the weld on frame brace AND the bolt on frame brace are installed, would you trust it? Or would you replace PART of the frame rail? Or would you look for another frame? Or would you set it on fire and call the insurance company?
     
  2. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    I'd take it to a shop that specializes in frame repairs and see what they have to say about it. If it's repaired right, it should be stronger than stock. /forums/images/icons/cool.gif
     
  3. four_by_ken

    four_by_ken 1/2 ton status

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    If it is repaired correctly, you should have no worries.

    Ken H.
     
  4. COLLISION

    COLLISION 1/2 ton status

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    Make sure the shop has the proper equipment to repair it. If the job is done correctly you have nothing to worry about.
     
  5. nvrenuf

    nvrenuf NONE shall pass! Premium Member

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    Of course, this is EXACTLY what I wanted to hear!

    THANKS EVERYBODY!!
     
  6. trukman1

    trukman1 1/2 ton status

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    Here are some tricks for welding frames...when you weld the crack it will cause the metal on each side of the weld to stretch creating a weak point. Remember all the times you've heard that a weld is stronger than the steel around it? This is why. It also causes the molecules of the steel to distort. You can remedy this by using a torch to heat the entire area red hot and letting it cool slowly. Generally, if you don't grind your welds flat, IF the frame breaks again it will usually crack next to the weld. If you grind your welds flat and it cracks, it will usually crack in the weld itself. To do it right, drill a hole at the end of the crack. Not just the crack you see, but at the end indicated my magnafluxing. After welding the crack. take a piece of flat stock , preferably of the same thickness that that you are welding to that extends 6-8" past your weld. Cut the ends at a 45 degree angle (this lessens the "shear" effect) and , starting back the thickness of the plate from the edge (Ex. If you have 3/16" plate, start back 3/16" from all egdes) weld one inch ...skip an inch...so on and so forth, alternating ends and sides as you go. DO NOT WELD THE ENDS!!! Frames repaired in this way will not break if done by a competent welder. IF YOUR WELDER WANTS TO WELD THE ENDS OF YOUR PATCH PLATE, FIND ANOTHER WELDER!!!. As for the frame reinforcements offered to fix the steering box frame area breakages, I haven't done any of those but reinforcement as I described above shuold take care of any frame problem. Remember, any weld is only as good as the person welding it. And the easiest crack to fix is the one you get to before it breaks. (PATCH IT BEFORE IT BREAKS!) Several gentlemen I apprenticed under taught me that stuff. One had a book that he had gotten somewhere (could be out of print now ) that had a wealth of information on stuff like this and wasn't real expensive at the time. I'll try to find out the name and how to get it and post the information if I can. Sorry for the long post but safety is the prime concern (and not breaking down). Thanks for your patience everyone. Gary
     
  7. trukman1

    trukman1 1/2 ton status

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    Some clarification on the above post, usually a piece of flat stock 2" wide will suffice for our frames. Also, this is for welding the legs of the channel, that is the top and bottom horizontal portions of the frames. Truck frames twist and generally welding on the vertical portion should only be done by VERY experienced welders. I know, lot's of people will say they've done theirs different and never had problems but this method is used in big rig repair shops with great success. Thanks.
     
  8. m j

    m j 1/2 ton status

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    excellent post
     
  9. 91K5

    91K5 1/2 ton status

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    If it's repaired correctly its just as good as new. My K5 was totalled by getting crunched in the front end, the frame was straigtnened back out and is just fine.
     

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