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zero rates?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by RIPPEDK5, Apr 16, 2007.

  1. RIPPEDK5

    RIPPEDK5 Guest

    I had been kinda misled I think about zero rates. First I see them being put both in front and rear suspensions for height. You call them "zero rate" because why? Far as I knew regular steel or aluminum blocks had "zero rate" or no spring rate to them? arent these just blocks? and arent they unsafe in the front under the spring?

    I dont believe the answer, " well they have pins to center and hold their place"--> so do blocks!

    Someone please explain these "blocks" and why they are called "zero rates"

    thanks
     
  2. NEK5

    NEK5 3/4 ton status Premium Member

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    First off, "blocks" and "zero rates" are two different animals. Blocks can be used in the rear, but not in the front. The reason for this is that they only have "dimples" that hold them in place on the leaf spring and axle perch, they DO NOT have pins. The zero rates can be used front and rear, for this reason (directly from ORD)

    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Most Blazers and Suburbans sit low in the rear, and a lot of truck owners also want to relocate their axles forward or back a little for better fender clearance or for a bit more wheelbase and driveshaft length. This is the answer to both problems.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]You're probably asking about the name. Well, we didn't want to call them blocks since they're really not a true block, they bolt to the spring pack just like another leaf. We didn't want to call them add a leaves since most people think add a leaves will stiffen the springs. So they're an add a leaf that won't stiffen the springs, they add "zero" to the rate.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]These short leaves are CNC machined solid steel with offset holes to allow you to move the axle 1" or 1.5" forward or backward from the spring pin location. You can also leave the axle right on the spring center pin if you like and only use them to raise the truck 1". The top corners are radiused to prevent stress risers in the spring pack.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Since these are a true bolt in leaf, they are safe to use on the front or rear suspension for extra ride height or to relocate the axle. To use the offset, you bolt the leaf to your spring using one of the offset holes and cut the center pin off to bolt into the leaf in the center hole. This will move your axle forward or backward 1" or 1.5" depending on which hole you use and which way you mount the leaf.[/FONT][FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]
    To mount the leaf centered on the spring, you simply run the full length center pin through the center hole of the leaf and through the pin hole in the spring pack.
    [/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]The kit includes the machined "leaves" along with new center pins and bolts to install them. [/FONT][FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]
    You will have to drill a hole in the ubolt plate for the new offset spring pin location. You will also need to make sure your ubolts are long enough, you need to have 1" or more of extra thread to use the Zero Rate™ kit. ORD has ubolt kits available to accomodate the extra length if yours won't.
    [/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]On front applications with crossover steering be aware that you will be losing clearance between the draglink and your RH spring. The full 1" from the offset Zero Rates™ could cause you problems there, make sure to check it out.[/FONT]
     
  3. neverendingproject

    neverendingproject 1/2 ton status

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    There you go. Also, the reason you can use them in the front is because they are only an inch thick, which really isnt much if you think about it. The extra stress put on a front spring pack by the zero rate when under load is negligible if any at all.
     
  4. divorced

    divorced 3/4 ton status

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    Kinda off topic, but kinda related... why do some 80,000 lb semi trucks come from the factory with blocks (sometimes 4") on the front axle?
     
  5. neverendingproject

    neverendingproject 1/2 ton status

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    Because the springs are so stiff they might as well have used I beams.
     
  6. vortec

    vortec 1/2 ton status

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    100% correct. even though the tiny dimples help keep the block centered on the perch and spring, they can still walk out if the u-bolts back off some.

    plus, zero rates are machined from a solid steel block, afaik, and most blocks i've seen are cast iron, which can crack much easier than steel. that said, i've seen many lift blocks last just fine, even when used offroad on a regular basis. blocks aren't "bad". they just aren't the best setup for real wheeling. unless i get a shackle flip before i install my lift, i'll be on blocks for a little while, at least.
     

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