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Princess, 1985 Chevy M1009 wife's Daily

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wallet under gas pedal
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I see it's still 24V starting. Quite a system, with the dual12V alternators!
 

campfire

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My wife took this to make a Costco run last Saturday. I ended up running down after she called because it wouldn't start. Looks like the glow plug controller card is acting up and glow plugs are not functioning properly, if at all. I was able to get it going with a shot of starting fluid, swapped vehicles with her, and ran a couple errands on the way home. It starts fine while warm.

Aftermarket controllers are available, which would be a good idea if you are switching to more modern long-cycle plugs (like Duraterm or 60G). Or you could just switch to manual GP control. I prefer manual control. My 1983 controller was annoying in that it did a poor job of compensating for ambient temperature. 0 degrees outside? 2-second glow cycle. 80 degrees outside? Same 2-second cycle (until it got hot enough to cut out). Doesn't work properly with self-limiting long-cycle plugs.
 

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I see it's still 24V starting. Quite a system, with the dual12V alternators!

I miss my 24V starter. Not quite enough to retrofit it onto my civilian rig. But the 24V gear-reduction starter whipped that engine over very nicely in single-digit weather.

Is it sill a 24V glow plug system? That's a liability due to the crummy resistor design. It works fine until the first plug burns out, then the rest of the plugs get overloaded and the failures cascade down the line.

Rewiring the plugs onto the 12V bus is a trivial change that adds peace of mind. Unless you plan on getting a 24V jump from an M35a1.
 

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My '83 works great. It has for the 15 yrs I've owned my blazer. Did glow plugs a few back. If I had to change it I'd do a 7.3L powerstroke relay with a manual button.
 

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My '83 works great. It has for the 15 yrs I've owned my blazer. Did glow plugs a few back. If I had to change it I'd do a 7.3L powerstroke relay with a manual button.

Are you still using short-cycle plugs, or is the controller modified for long cycles? I kinda liked my 1993 controller. Long initial cycle and then thermostatically-controlled variable cycles after that. It did a decent job of applying the correct amount of heat.

Though it also had a manual button, and that got used on cold winter days. The fixed-length initial cycle wasn't long enough for single digit weather, and the subsequent cycles were always shorter (but still longer than the early short-cycle controllers).
 

kennyw

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The M1009 system uses a control card under the dash with a coolant temp sensor to control glue plug cycles based on engine temp. It is likely the predecessor to the 93 controller you like. In my case the $10 temp sensor appears to be the issue and I picked up a new one.

Someone else had already bypassed the resistor and rewired the glow plugs to the 12V bus so I don't expect and cascade glue plug failures.
 

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The M1009 system uses a control card under the dash with a coolant temp sensor to control glue plug cycles based on engine temp. It is likely the predecessor to the 93 controller you like. In my case the $10 temp sensor appears to be the issue and I picked up a new one.

Someone else had already bypassed the resistor and rewired the glow plugs to the 12V bus so I don't expect and cascade glue plug failures.

With a new sensor and 12V plugs, you should be good to go (though a new control card is a good idea if yours is still original).

And, yeah, there are about half a dozen revisions of GP controller that GM used on these engines. They kept tweaking it to get the recipe right. I have a chapter on them in my 6.2 rebuild manual if you ever need to look up the original timing specs. Or the newer specs that work better with modern slow plugs.
 

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Looks like someone upgraded the sensor to a different one than original. I saw reference to it somewhere and need to find it.

20220129_173115.jpg

20220129_173141.jpg
 

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Rockauto has the newer replacement, still $10 but now I have to wait on shipping. The 2 pin sensor comes up cross referencing the original GM part number, 10045847.
 

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I drove it into work today and it didn't want to restart when hot after the drive home. After cooling off, it started but sluggish. Checking voltages while running, the front battery was at 11.4 V while the rear battery was 13.5. I put the front battery on a charger overnight and I'll recheck in the morning, but good odds one alternator is on the way out. The PO replaced one on the driver side already, should be the other one but I'll need to confirm.
 

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The front battery is charged by the drivers alternator. Check the ground wire from the alternator to the intake manifold. One of mine had that wire corrode over at the intake and stopped charging. All the rest of the times though it has been a bad alternator.

I haven't driven any of mine with the lid off. Is there any exhaust back flow like happens when you drive with the rear window down?
 

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The front battery is charged by the drivers alternator. Check the ground wire from the alternator to the intake manifold. One of mine had that wire corrode over at the intake and stopped charging. All the rest of the times though it has been a bad alternator.

I haven't driven any of mine with the lid off. Is there any exhaust back flow like happens when you drive with the rear window down?
No notable exhaust fumes. I'll be checking everything over once I get it back into the shop this weekend.
 

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The fumes with the top off are not noticeable like with the top on and the window down.

Martin
 

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I filled the empty space on front bumper.
20220828_172439.jpg

I still haven't figured out the charging issue but the driver side alternator is fairly new but not charging. I will need to pull it and get it tested.
 

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I am working on installing new seals on the fiberglass top. I started with wire wheel to the surface rust in the cab and treating it with Rust Mort. Then some primer and paint.

Yesterday we removed the old gaskets and attempted to glue on one running across the front of the topper, it didn't work. Then the horses kicked dirt and gravel on the tacky adhesive this morning.

Today I was successful in cleaning off the first attempt at gluing the new seals on with rubbing alcohol. I picked up the 3M super seal adhesive to try tomorrow.

20220922_192631.jpg
 
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