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ATTENTION WELDERS.....is this thing a P.O.S.?

tRustyK5

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Just a basic stick welder...useless for light guage stuff, and you need 230 Volt service.

Rene
 

fjleiter

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[ QUOTE ]
why 220 if its light guage? wierd, that sux. how heavy could that weld?

[/ QUOTE ]

Stick welders will blow through thin gauge metal, only good for thicker stuff. One in the auction would probably be good up to about 3/16" or 1/4" single pass.

If your looking to do any body panels etc... You would want mig (little easier to work with as well)
 

tRustyK5

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[ QUOTE ]
why 220 if its light guage? wierd, that sux. how heavy could that weld?

[/ QUOTE ]

why 220? Becuase that's what it's set up to use...

" *New* 230 Volt Arc Welder by Speedway *No Reserve* "

Rene
 

jakeslim

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this guy is selling a boat load of them starting at 41 bucks. looks like he delivers though based on feedback.
 

mofugly13

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Hmmmm. /forums/images/graemlins/thinking.gif Must've "fell off a truck". But whafuh? For $54 to my door, I might just pick one up....
 

jakeslim

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makes ya wonder a little...wonder if they are factory rejects. So what's the verdict, not a good welder for a beginner? /forums/images/graemlins/dunno.gif
 

uglychevyZZ4

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[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
why 220? Becuase that's what it's set up to use...
" *New* 230 Volt Arc Welder by Speedway *No Reserve* "

Rene

[/ QUOTE ]I didnt mean to be a smart alleck Rene, you were the one i was hoping would see this post...I meant why do they use 220 on one that is mostly for light stuff? seems like they would save that for the big dogs....would this weld a frame or work to weld up a cage, you know, general fab? Im not welder savvy /forums/images/graemlins/dunno.gif
 

tRustyK5

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Rob, didn't mean to be a smart a$$...

A stick welder draws more amperage than a Mig welder so unless you are using very tiny electrodes you need the higher amperage avaialble with 220 service. The stick welder has a transformer inside that steps down the voltage and ups the amperage. Open circuit voltage on a stick machine is typically around 30-50 volts and amperage is constant according to what you set the machine at. Even a small home 'buzz-box' will easily weld 3/8" - 1/2" plate but the machine is working pretty hard and will need a cool down period now and then.

Typically the duty cycle on a small stick machine is similar to the small MIG machines...roughly 20%.

The big dog machines you see in a shop are as big as they are to get between 60% and 100% duty cycle.

A bit more info for you. A stick machine is also known as a 'constant current' machine. You set the amperage(current) and the voltage will vary as it needs to depending on arc length, and rod angle etc etc. If you had a meter on it while someone was welding and had it set at 100 amps...you'd see that plain as day.

A MIG machine is also known as a constant voltage machine. To set the heat you adjust the voltage seen at the tip of the wire. Usually between 17-32 volts depending on the size of the machine. Then the amperage will vary depending on how much wire speed you have, stick out length etc etc. Again with a meter hooked up you would see that plain as day.

Our machines at work are all digital readout and infinte adjustmant Millers. We have a CV Miller that's good to 35 volts and 400 amps for small wire feed stuff, and we have a dual purpose machine for Stick welding (600 amp CC) and heavier wire (35 volts and 600 amp)

This reply is getting a little long, but the general jist is if you're building bumpers and stuff the stick welder would be OK...with a fair bit of practice. If you plan on smaller thinner stuff or any rust repair a small 110 volt MIG would be better.

Hope that clears a few things up. /forums/images/graemlins/weld.gif

Rene
 

cybrfire

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I have the miller sp135. It's a 110v wire feed. I have no trouble welding up to 3/16" thick in a single pass. 1/4" works well with a small amount of preparation. As far as a roll cage goes your talking about .120" material or so. With that in mind I wouldn't be afraid of using it to weld a cage.
 
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