Printed Circuit Boards In Dash?????????

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Bubba Ray Boudreaux, Jun 19, 2005.

  1. Bubba Ray Boudreaux

    Bubba Ray Boudreaux 1 ton status

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    WTF do they do exactly????????????????
     
  2. jarheadk5

    jarheadk5 1/2 ton status

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    Are you referring to the sorta-flexible one behind the gauge cluster? If so, that's what powers the gauges . Why the General did that... who the hell knows.
     
  3. tiger9297

    tiger9297 1/2 ton status

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    had to replace mine a few months ago. i agree that's not a good way to run the instruments.
     
  4. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    You mean short of supplying +, -, to the gauges, various bulbs, (illumination, high beam, turn signals, check engine/choke, 4wd, brake, plus idiot lights if not gauge equipped) and carrying the output of the various senders/sensors to said gauges?

    I'm sure GM did it partially because it's a good way to cut down on clutter, wiring hassle/expense, maintenance, and how deep the dash needed to be. Nothing at all wrong with PCB's, think of one electrical device that doesn't use one. (well, ok, one that doesn't use a circuit board of one type or other) Not to mention every GM vehicle I can think of, 1970's into at least the 1990's.

    A single connector into the back of the cluster makes more sense than 18 wires terminating in seperate locations.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2005

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