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Will these springs work....

Discussion in '1969-1972 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by Moody, Nov 24, 2006.

  1. Moody

    Moody 1/2 ton status

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    Did some checking at the junkyard today and I found a set of springs I think will work. I want to put 56's with a shackle flip on my 70.....the springs I found are off of a 89 3/4 ton with a 14 bolt. Are these 56's and will they fit on my rig? I already have 3/4 ton running gear so will I need the mounting plates of this truck or can I use the ones I already have?
     
  2. Moody

    Moody 1/2 ton status

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  3. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    1st Gens use the same spring lengths as the later model Blazers, it's a direct swap.

    As for lift, a stock spring doesn't add any... :rolleyes:

    I swapped a stock original spring for the later model stock spring....the only "lift" I got was from the shackleflip, longer shackle and the slightly taller spring perches I made.

    The idea you have is good...those rears are basically free and will flex quite a bit better than the stock 1st Gen ones.


    :usaflag:
     
  4. Moody

    Moody 1/2 ton status

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    the springs I found are off of a 89 3/4 ton with a 14 bolt.


    I am a little confused....The springs are off a 89 K2500 long bed pickup. Are these still 52's (Same as my stock blazer) I thought 3/4 tons and 1 tons had 56's.

    When using a stock spring and a shackle flip I thought you get 4 inches of lift.:confused:
     
  5. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Why not just measure them???

    ....and yes, a shackle flip adds about 4". My point was that there is nothing magical about using later model springs. If they are stock, they don't add lift.
     
  6. Moody

    Moody 1/2 ton status

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    I was just hoping someone else knew the length before I go roll around in the mud in sub-freezing temperatures taking the springs off the truck. :D
     
  7. 55Willy

    55Willy 3/4 ton status

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    by 89 all 3/4 were 56's

    in fact if it is a 89 k2500 they should be 64's for as 3/4 tons had already went to the new body style.
     
  8. Captainfab

    Captainfab 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    An 89 3/4 ton rear springs should be 64"....some people call them 63"
     
  9. Moody

    Moody 1/2 ton status

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    Thanks guys, I guess I'll have to go back and look for a pre 88 burb or 3/4 ton truck. Anyone happen to know about when they started using 56's. I thought it was mid to early eighties. I'm glad you guys told me before I started pulling them off and finding out they were longer than I wanted. I found another 81 burb but it's a 1/2 ton. Any chance they would be 56's?
     
  10. 55Willy

    55Willy 3/4 ton status

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    56's started in the early 70's.

    for 56's you have to find a 3/4 ton.
    if it's so hard to find 56's then get some ford 57's and a zero rate(to move axle back to where it should be.
     
  11. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Which is it? If there's mud it's isn't below freezing..... :p:
     
  12. Moody

    Moody 1/2 ton status

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    Right now it's a mute point......when I woke up this morning there was about three inches of snow and a heavy snow advisory until six this evening!:(
     
  13. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    I feel you dawg..... :D

    [​IMG]
     
  14. ratpack_7

    ratpack_7 Registered Member

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    So whats the answer? yes or no?
    I have a set of 2nd gen skyjacker 6" lift springs that I was going to use for 74 but i ended up buying a 72 with 6" skyjackers on the front and blocks on the rear. can i use the rears that I have to replace the blocks?
    I thought there was a isuse with the centering hole on the 2nd gen springs. For example 1st gen mesure 24" / 28" and 2nd gens are even like 26" / 26" Does this matter?
     
  15. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    The rear springs are identical in length from 1st Gen to 2nd Gen..... I've never heard of the spring pin being relocated on later model springs, and I didn't have any issues bolting a set of '89 springs onto my '72.
     

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