6.2L oil cooler lines

Discussion in '1982-Present GM Diesel' started by B.barket, Jul 7, 2019.

  1. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    It is no different in MA really--it is not often I call around for parts for my '82 and any of the half dozen different auto parts located close by ever have what I need "in stock"...it is almost always a day or two wait,that means 2 trips,one to pay for the part(s) and then back again to pick them up..
    Not many square bodies around to pick at in salvage yards any more here either..
    It's the curse of owning an "antique"..:surepal:..

    I always look up my own parts online and give them the part numbers too--that way if the wrong parts come in,it is no one's fault but my own..some countermen cop an attitude when I do that,like they are miffed I dont trust them,but I know my truck a lot better than they do,and what things are no longer original,and the "right parts" listed for it no longer will fit !..
     
  2. ridenby

    ridenby 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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  3. B.barket

    B.barket Registered Member Premium Member

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    Well they're in.. And the verdict is a dry garage floor!!. I wish I had discovered this leak long ago. For the life of me for the last 2 years I swore it had to be a valve cover causing it. The biggest amature piece of advice I can give any one replacing these lines is to TAKE A PICTURE of them underneath before you remove them. Cripes!, I spent 2hrs on my back trying to get the lines into their original positions at the engine. Where the bent metal ends of the lines meet the engine, they snake around and overlap each other so it's not super easy to get them back in position. At least for me it wasn't. Honestly I don't know what the engineers were thinking. Maybe I'm missing something but it seems to me that these lines could have easily just come off the engine and made one turn to head up toward the rad. Most of the bends in the pipes just seem unnecessary?. Anyway. I got up inside with a crow bar. And using the header for leverage did my best to bend back the metal edge a bit that the old line was rubbing on that caused this problem in the first place. Tight quarters up in there so I really couldn't do much. Lastly I took the advice from earlier in this thread and cut a piece of 5/8 inch high heat pvc rubber hose and put it on the pipe to protect it at that spot. Anyway. All cleaned, went for a drive and no oil on the ground whatsoever afterward. Thanks for all the help lads!.
     
    longbedder and ridenby like this.
  4. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    If the crimp collars and tubing are steel on your new hoses I would either paint them or put some grease on them to ward off rust...

    The steel they use now seems to rust quickly ,I put a new P/S hose on a friends car not that long ago,maybe 6 months ago--yesterday I looked at it and its crimp collars were already rusty!--looks ten years old !..I sprayed white lube on it too when I was done installing it,it must have washed off...yesterday I sprayed battery terminal protector spray on them,its like a spray on rubber type of stuff.
    First we sprayed Duro "Extend" rust converter on them,let it dry--it turns rust into a black primer coating that retards future rusting ..

    I have coated new brake lines and other parts like them I don't want rusting quick with Indian Head Gasket Shellac...stuff is permanent once it dries...
     

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