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Red Velvet | 1983 Chevy K5 Blazer

Keeping pretty original, but making it a good running daily driver.

83blazertexas

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This rust repair project is almost done. Garry just welded on the bracket that supports the metal fuel filler hose. So that no more welding at least.

You can see this part of the restore was done in solid fashion. Taking Garry a total of 80 hours from start to finish. Cutting, sanding, blasting, welding, new cross beam added, new rear bed sections, some fabrication and ref enforcing along with paint and rust treatment.

Solid work and well worth the 80 hours to do it right.
 
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83blazertexas

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We didn't measure the tailgate gaps at bottom before removing but is tight now at about 1/8 on each side. New brake covers are on. Nearly there now!

tailgate back on painting hinges.jpg
 

83blazertexas

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What project should go next? More Rust Repair, Engine, Brakes, Hoses and Bushings, suspension?
 

6872xtc

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What project should go next? More Rust Repair, Engine, Brakes, Hoses and Bushings, suspension?
I would do any rust repair that you plan on ever doing now. I say this because I have seen vehicles sit for a long time getting body work done, and it isn't nice on the mechanical aspects. Sitting and then lots of start/stop cycles take a toll. No way that I would do that to a new engine. It is even worse on the battery, of course.
Then when you can drive it consistently, get after the mechanical stuff, but do an assessment of what needs the attention first, drivetrain or suspension and brakes.
 

83blazertexas

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All done with operation tail pan rust. Here's an overview:

Remove tailgate.

Lift rear of vehicle as much as possible for access.

Remove gas tank and fuel filler pipe, cutting hoses to help removal.

Remove 4 body mounting bolts (rusted in)

Remove both rear lamps

Fit cardboard lining inside rear area for protection.

Cut out rusted rear cross member and rear part of the rear section of load area

floor. Cut out rust in both tailgate posts as required, Clean up rust in surrounding

areas as best as possible, make up plates to repair and weld in.

Clean and re-use some of the original bolts, replacing those badly rusted. Fit new

cross member, measuring and adjusting for correct fit. Weld in place.

Fit new floor sections, cutting for correct fit and weld in.

Cut out left side mid floor body mounting plate and badly rusted floor sections as

required. Make up replacement plate and repair sections. Clean up surrounding

rust as best as possible. Weld in repair sections.

Remove spare wheel mounting plate and fuel filler pipe mount from old floor, clean

up, drill hole in new floor for spare wheel mount. Weld both in place. Remove old

left side trim panel mount bracket from old floor. Clean, paint and fit to new floor.

Make up and fit bracket on right side

Grind off welds and remaining rust on top of floor, seam seal and paint.

Make holes for rear body mounting bolts.

Refit gas tank with new hoses and clamps with filler pipe.

Fit new body mounts in place and drop body onto them and bolting down.

Paint area in rear lamp pockets with cavity wax.

Swap over original wiring into new lamp assembly's and fit silver trim pieces onto

new lamp lenses. Fit lamps, reconnect wiring, clip in place and test.

Clean up original tailgate mounting bolts and rust on hinges, re-tap threads in

hinges. Fit tailgate, adjusting for best fit. Connect window motor wiring and test.

Paint tailgate hinges and touch up paint chips.

Charge battery.

Remove cardboard lining.

85 hours labor

1 month

400 in parts (tail pan, bed floor panels, bolts, hoses, fuel line, new tail laps, etc)
 

83blazertexas

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Ok. Moving on to rebuild the engine next:

As of 1/24/2020 I'm getting rid of the current/original 305. Swapping for a 350 from 1987 when they updated the cores and giving a little more hp.

Going for a maintenance free, daily driver engine build. keeping cast iron exhaust manifold so it doesn't need gaskets as often as header. The 87 engine updgrade tends to leak less at valve covers cause headers are taller.
Refurb will be all new parts. New carb, new intake manifold, distributor, cam, rings, bearings... Getting rid of all the air flow hoses, pumps, computer chips etc.. this should give it a bit more power as well.

Overall going for the solid, long lasting, hood down, less maintenance route. Strength and towing vs speed and top end.

Pic is today. As you can see pretty original.. not much hacking has happened.

20200122_163136.jpg
 

83blazertexas

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While waiting for a few engine quotes to come back, I went ahead and got everything you see here for my next rust repair project.

floorpans.jpg
 
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